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Pricing

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Paolo
Pricing
on Sep 10, 2005 at 12:36:04 pm

Hi everybody,
I'm editor and co-founder of an italian video prod company.
We work mainly for corporate and other video stuff (music, educational, fiction, etc).
I'd like to know what could be the price for a corporate video of the quality we generally have.
WE usually create multilanguage DVDs, with animate menus with photogalleries and corporate video in 2 or more languages.
you can have same examples here:
http://www.madamastudio.com

I'd like to know if our works can be considered any good or if they are very newbie.

Thanks a lot.
Paolo


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Craig Seeman
Re: Pricing
on Oct 2, 2005 at 4:27:25 pm

3 weeks and nobody responded to you. Don't even know you're checking this thread. Think about why nobody responded. I can venture a guess.

It's hard to figure out pricing from region to region. In the USA prices can differ greatly from region to region due to market size and demand. Costs of doing business can differ greatly from urban to suburban to rural even within a region. It's even harder for people to figure pricing in a given country and, like the USA, may vary from region to region in that country or across boarders which is not uncommon in Europe.

Another factor is target market. Which businesses are you targeting? Budgets of a multinational vs the budget of a local business. One can have a broad target though. I do have a suggestion for you on this issue.

Your work is very nice BUT your web page may have problems depending on your target. Your pages and text links are too small in my opinion. Older people in management/decision making positions may have a hard time navigating you site to see the demos. If your target is young, "hip" businesses that may not be issue. If you plan to reach people high up some business chains who are 50, 60 plus, your site may strain their eyes.


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Paolo
Re: Pricing
on Oct 8, 2005 at 12:33:04 pm

Thanks for your reply.
Yes, we're changing the web site right now just for the problem you
told.
I was just wondering how is the quality of our work.
WE're selling our corporate DVD (you saw the movies) and enhanced DVD for


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debe
Re: Pricing
by
on Oct 9, 2005 at 6:07:50 pm

It's so different depending on where you are and what the market around you will bear.

The best thing to do is to add it all up. What do you and your partners need to get paid to support yourselves? How much does the equipment and software cost, and how often will you need to upgrade? How much is rent on your space, and will it likely rise in the first year? How much do you spend on incidentals that you can't line-item on an invoice? Do you need any form of insurance for your company? Do you expect to work every day, or will you have low points that you'll need to carry yourselves through? Will you have to hire any outside people for any of this work, and what are their rates, generally? You need to know how much running the company will cost you in order to set your rates.

You also need to know how much it's going to cost you to produce these materials before you can set rates. It also wouldn't hurt to know if there's any competition in the area and what kinds of rates they charge. Not to undersell them or to "steal" business from them, but if you know what businesses in your area are already willing to spend, it can also help you figure out how much to charge.

"Too much" or "too little" is relative. For three weeks and 2 days of work, assuming those are full days and you wouldn't be able to work on anything else at the same time, you are looking at earning an average of 391.30 euro a day maximum. Does that cover your expenses, both business and personal, for all of you? I'd assume there'd be some taxes in there of some sort.

Pricing isn't a "one-size fits all" kind of thing. I can charge less than someone with a full-blown facility because I didn't have to buy nearly as much equipment. My day rate is lower because I have lower overhead. It doesn't cost me as much to run my business as someone who has five racks full of gear, or an entire machine room and multiple edit/production suites. However, I also am limited in what I can offer. If my clients need more, we have to rent other facilities. In those cases, the rates change.

Just sit down and do the math. If you can't pay the bills, then it's too little. If you could buy a small island, it's probably too much.

debe


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debe
Re: Pricing
by
on Oct 9, 2005 at 6:07:51 pm

It's so different depending on where you are and what the market around you will bear.

The best thing to do is to add it all up. What do you and your partners need to get paid to support yourselves? How much does the equipment and software cost, and how often will you need to upgrade? How much is rent on your space, and will it likely rise in the first year? How much do you spend on incidentals that you can't line-item on an invoice? Do you need any form of insurance for your company? Do you expect to work every day, or will you have low points that you'll need to carry yourselves through? Will you have to hire any outside people for any of this work, and what are their rates, generally? You need to know how much running the company will cost you in order to set your rates.

You also need to know how much it's going to cost you to produce these materials before you can set rates. It also wouldn't hurt to know if there's any competition in the area and what kinds of rates they charge. Not to undersell them or to "steal" business from them, but if you know what businesses in your area are already willing to spend, it can also help you figure out how much to charge.

"Too much" or "too little" is relative. For three weeks and 2 days of work, assuming those are full days and you wouldn't be able to work on anything else at the same time, you are looking at earning an average of 391.30 euro a day maximum. Does that cover your expenses, both business and personal, for all of you? I'd assume there'd be some taxes in there of some sort.

Pricing isn't a "one-size fits all" kind of thing. I can charge less than someone with a full-blown facility because I didn't have to buy nearly as much equipment. My day rate is lower because I have lower overhead. It doesn't cost me as much to run my business as someone who has five racks full of gear, or an entire machine room and multiple edit/production suites. However, I also am limited in what I can offer. If my clients need more, we have to rent other facilities. In those cases, the rates change.

Just sit down and do the math. If you can't pay the bills, then it's too little. If you could buy a small island, it's probably too much.

debe


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