FORUMS: list search recent posts

New Camera

COW Forums : Corporate Video

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Mike AllenNew Camera
by on May 2, 2005 at 7:41:48 pm

Our corperation has $10,000 to spend on a new camera. I am considering the new DSR-400. I know many are moving to HDV, however, in my price range we would only be able to afford some type of small prosumer camcorder. I am not crazy about that idea. Any thoughts on the best camcorder in the $10,000 dollar range. I am editing on FCP and Media 100.


Return to posts index

Todd at UCSBRe: New Camera
by on May 2, 2005 at 10:51:35 pm

Hi Mike,
Spending money on gear is my specialty :P
I agree with your assesment on HDV, it's still a couple years off. But I would still look really hard at the new Panasonic AG-HVX200. Not for it's HD, but for it's P2 cards solid state recording. One of the biggest slow downs for an editor is waiting for your footage to digitize. WIth the solid state cards it's 4-8x realtime. Plus their are no moving parts when it's recording.

But the bigger questions is: for $10,000 that gets you the DSR-400 camera body! Nothing else. No Lens, no mics, no monitor, etc. You might have a monitor and/or mic, but the lens alone will run $2-15k. DSR 400 is a nice camera, but with a cheap lens, you're not going to notice. Plus the internal mics with those cameras make it really nice to shoot with. I bought the Sennhieser Mic to go with the SDX-900 that we have, it was expensive, but worth it.

When we were looking at DSR-570, I believe the mic package was $3-4k. Ouch!

Point is you might want to think a little smaller, but outfit it completely. ei: XL-2, Panasonic line, Sony HVRZ1U, etc.
Or, look for a used package that comes with a nice lens.
FWIW



Todd at UCSB
Television Production

Todd at UCSB
Television Production


Return to posts index

Peter DeCrescenzoRe: New Camera
by on May 2, 2005 at 11:19:46 pm

[Todd at UCSB] "... for $10,000 that gets you the DSR-400 camera body! Nothing else. No Lens, no mics, no monitor, etc. ..."

For the record, the Sony DSR-400 camcorder ships from Sony with a built-in 2.5" LCD color screen and their DXF-801 1.5" hi-res B&W CRT viewfinder:
http://bssc.sel.sony.com/BroadcastandBusiness/DisplayModel?m=0&p=2&sp=11&id...

Sony's "ECM670 Short Shotgun Microphone" lists for $395. I expect it typically sells for less than that. If it's the same mic which ships with the DSR-250 it's a good basic mic; I've heard it's made by Sennheiser, but I haven't confirmed this.

B&H sells the DSR-400 with a basic lens (and of course the standard VF & LCD) for $10K USD:
http://tinyurl.com/8th3n

Seems like a heck of a deal to me for a 2/3" 4:3 DVCAM camcorder. ;-)

All the best,

- Peter

Just a friendly reminder to all: Please consider filling-in your COW user profile information so we have a better idea who you are, where you're from, and so forth. It's the friendly thing to do. Thanks!


Return to posts index


Todd at UCSBRe: New Camera
by on May 2, 2005 at 11:41:38 pm

Sorry, must have been too short handed.
I was refering to a Wireless Lav Mic system. not the shotgun. 2 channel UHF system. Looked on SOny.com, doesn't list the reciever? But it doesn't look that expersive. That's good.

Also, I was refering to a CRT or Hi-Res monitor, not the LCD camera monitor.

It sounds like a good camera, but I would be a little worried buying into technology that is at the end of it's lifecycle.
That's why we didn't buy the DSR-570.
Nothing against Sony, we're ALL ABOUT DVCAM over here. over a dozen DVCAM decks a counting, but Sony's moving towards optical and Panasonic is moving towards solid state.

Like most camera purchases, companies want them to last. So you wouldn't want to buy a camera that you would need/want to replace in 2 years.

Good Luck,


Todd at UCSB
Television Production


Return to posts index

Peter DeCrescenzoRe: New Camera
by on May 3, 2005 at 12:28:25 am

Hi Todd,

[Todd at UCSB] "... I was refering to a Wireless Lav Mic system. not the shotgun. 2 channel UHF system. Looked on SOny.com, doesn't list the reciever? But it doesn't look that expersive. That's good. ..."

I don't believe Mike mentioned anything about a microphone or a monitor. I was attempting to respond to his original question, and also the apparently unrelated issues you raised.

[Todd at UCSB] "... Also, I was refering to a CRT or Hi-Res monitor, not the LCD camera monitor. ..."

That's good to know, but Mike didn't ask about monitors.

[Todd at UCSB] "It sounds like a good camera, but I would be a little worried buying into technology that is at the end of it's lifecycle. That's why we didn't buy the DSR-570."

The DSR-400 & DSR-450WS are new 2/3" DVCAM camcorder designs. The DSR-570WS, although a great DVCAM camcorder, is a relatively old design.

DVCAM isn't really at the end of its lif cycle. In fact, one of Sony's new XDCAM optical cams records DVCAM onto disc. Further, many organizations -- possibly including yours -- will probably be using DVCAM for years to come.

[Todd at UCSB] "... Nothing against Sony, we're ALL ABOUT DVCAM over here. over a dozen DVCAM decks a counting, but Sony's moving towards optical and Panasonic is moving towards solid state. ..."

Glad to hear you're making the most of the DV25 codec; it's tough to beat dollars to doughnuts (so to speak).

Sony's move toward optical XDCAM and Panasonic's move toward P2 solidstate has only indirect bearing on someone who's looking to buy an under $10K camcorder package today. 2/3" XDCAM & P2 cams are far, far more expensive than Mike's $10K price range. Panasonic's 1/3" P2 "handycam"-style cam won't be available for several months, and Mike seems to prefer a fullsize shoulder-mount cam.

[Todd at UCSB] "... Like most camera purchases, companies want them to last. So you wouldn't want to buy a camera that you would need/want to replace in 2 years. ..."

Companies want all sorts of things, but no cam technology is future-proof. If Mike wants a fullsize shoulder-mount cam today, and one which records on cost-effective media today, and one which is compatible with all of the SD video gear he probably already has today -- then a cam like the Sony DSR-400 (or even the venerable DSR-570WS, or 1/2" JVC DV5100, or an Ikegami 2/3" DVCAM cam) are hard to beat.

The other 1/3" cams you mention are also All Good(TM), but they don't really address Mike's question and his stated preference.

All the best,

- Peter

Just a friendly reminder to all: Please consider filling-in your COW user profile information so we have a better idea who you are, where you're from, and so forth. It's the friendly thing to do. Thanks!


Return to posts index

KlausRe: New Camera
by on May 3, 2005 at 12:26:40 pm

While 4:3 is still the dominant screen ratio for the small screen, I would have strong reservations about about investing in a format that is moving quickly towards the end of its lifespan.

If you are particularly keen on investing in standard definition 4:3 format i would consider picking up one of the many second-hand bargains offered by people abandoning this technology and moving to the newer formats.


Return to posts index


Mike AllenRe: New Camera
by on May 3, 2005 at 2:07:25 pm

Thanks for the input. This was a hard choice to make but I decided to go with the DSR-400. I have never been truly happy with any of the 1/3 inch camcorders that I have used in the past. And while the smaller camcorders are ok on a tripod, they are a real pain to operate off of the tripod. Not to mention that they do not look or feel professional (IMHO). Also, I have read many posts relating to the problems with HDV while panning and tracking. I am sure these problems will be resolved but I do not want to invest in something that I will not be happy with. If we had a little more money I would wait for the DSR-450 but that is a little out of my price range. My thoughts are that we will move to some sort of HD progressive format in the future, however today with my current workflow and preferences, the DSR-400 is the right choice for me. After all, in the end my delivery system will be SD DVD for some time to come. I do not believe that the general public will run out and buy the latest HD DVD players for a while, many are still even using VHS. Most of the time my projects are displayed using some type of projector and large 4:3 screen, so the DVCam DSR should work fine for a while until we are ready to move to HD.


Return to posts index

GregRe: New Camera
by on May 4, 2005 at 2:14:14 pm

You should really look at the Ikegami HL-DV7A. I had to make the same decision you are making and I just purchased the Ikegami. It has great specs, a Great reputation, shoots DVCAM and can shoot in 4:3 and 16:9.

B&H has it in your price range.

Greg


Return to posts index

Peter DeCrescenzoRe: New Camera
by on May 3, 2005 at 2:29:49 pm

[Klaus] "... If you are particularly keen on investing in standard definition 4:3 format i would consider picking up one of the many second-hand bargains offered by people abandoning this technology and moving to the newer formats."

Yes, that's why I mentioned the DSR-570WS (an excellent native 16:9, 2/3", SD, shoulder-mount, DVCAM camcorder) and Ikegami (such as their excellent HLDV7AW 16:9, 2/3", SD, shoulder-mount, DVCAM camcorder) -- either new or used, these are great cams, and possibly within striking distance of Mike's <$10K budget if purchased used.

Not only do they address Mike's preference for a fullsize, shoulder-mount cam, at any point (if required) their recordings can be upconverted to HD with about as good results as "newer format" HDV handycam had been used instead. (Apparently, Sony reps at NAB last month were quoted as saying as much, and the relative _actual_ resolutions of these cams seem to bear this out.) Not to mention these big cams are a joy to work with, using real manual lenses, offering very good light sensitivity, full professional cam "menu" features, and such.

Obviously, if the "shoulder-mount" characteristic is not of primary importance, and given Mike's <$10K budget, then any of the current and soon-to-ship 1/3" HDV camcorders are also worthy of consideration. They're all native 16:9 of course and can shoot both SD & HD. They produce very good results, even in SD. However, operation in HDV mode may require new or upgraded editing hardware and software. Further, real HD monitors & projectors tend to be more expensive than their truly equivalent SD counterparts. It'll likely be awhile before HD-capable DVD distribution is sorted out, although the Avel LinkPlayer can be a cool stop-gap, HD Win-Media solution. Also, video shot at HD resolution is typically inappropriate for most web streaming video applications.

However, HDV can be a good choice for a variety of reasons, and not much more expensive than the previous generation of SD-only handycams such as the PD-150, PD-170, DVX-100a and such.

All the best,

- Peter

Just a friendly reminder to all: Please consider filling-in your COW user profile information so we have a better idea who you are, where you're from, and so forth. It's the friendly thing to do. Thanks!


Return to posts index


ote1kenobiRe: New Camera
by on May 5, 2005 at 8:55:51 pm

I work for a local government channel in North Carolina. I went to NAB and checked out all the high end gear and formats and came back with the same decision as Mike did: The DSR-400 is a great camera for the price. We'll be making the purchase in the next couple of days and I couldn't be happier. I personally own a DXC-D30 with a BetaSP back as well as a Panasonic DVX-100a, and I'm confident this 400 will give me a sweet picture for years to come.
P


Return to posts index

Michael AllenRe: New Camera
by on May 24, 2005 at 6:30:46 am

Did you get your camera in. I just put mine together today. Will do some tests tomorrow.

Mike


Return to posts index

Jiri VrozinaRe: New Camera
by on May 11, 2005 at 11:23:04 pm

Hi,
Whatever You do DO NOT buy 4:3 camera like DSR-400,buy DSR-450ws instead.
(if DVCAM is what you require).
I I were You,I would wait a while,my feeling is,Sony will bring camera like
DSR-450 with HDV back very soon.
Next year format like HDV will really become popular,so I would not personally buy any SD camera.
If You work freelance for others,wait another 2-4 months...SMPTE is just around corner.
I am sure cameras like JVC-100 will become very popular.
I would not consider upcomming Panasonic 200 with P2 mainly because of camera's lens.I never liked lenses on cameras like PD-170,Z-1,DVX-100 and xl-1,2..........JVC HD100 is the first decent small video camera,nicelly ballanced with Anton Bauer Battaries.
Take care-jiri vrozina


Return to posts index


Kenneth WhiteLow Cost Range Corp Video Camera
by on Oct 28, 2011 at 8:32:55 pm

I am in a corporate environment and I have been tasked with creating some videos. There is not a big budget at all. Can anyone suggest a low-cost camcorder or minicam or whatever....under $1k, that has a good image? This item isn't budgeted that's why we just need the best consumer-grade camera out there.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]