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Wedding video workflow advice

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Mark McKeoughWedding video workflow advice
by on Jan 25, 2012 at 4:16:44 am

Hey all,
So I'm getting a wedding video business going for this coming summer. Where I am going to work will be VERY seasonal so I have to get as much in as I can. I'm looking at shooting with an HDSLR (7d likely, with lavs and ext recorder). I'm looking for some workflow advice from start of shoot to finish. What can I expect in terms of data storage on HDSLRs? I know this is dependent on amount shot, so like GB/min maybe? Also, I'm curious about transfer times for the video to computer.
Most importantly, how fast are wedding video pros turning over projects these days? What are clients generally expecting? I've heard that with photographers, clients can sometimes wait several months. Is this acceptable for video? Also, I was thinking of selling myself on doing highlight reels only, but from what I've read in forums, it sounds like a lot of people are producing full ceremonies. What is demand like, generally? Thanks for any and all input and advice.


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Brent DunnRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Jan 25, 2012 at 6:24:53 pm

Demand is what your client is expecting. You can pitch it anyway you like. It comes down to your work and client expectations.

7D shoots about 1 hr. 45 minutes on a 32 Gig card for reference.
If you shoot with 2 or 3 cameras, adjust accordingly.

You can go to WEVA for more info on shooting / editing styles as well as In Focus. I would suggest attending one of their seminars....both have ended. Also, find a local association you can join to get the feel for your market.

Turn around on the better end would be 30 days. I've known some companies to take as long as 6 months, which is not a good way to run a business.

A Cinematic style requires additional equipment for a mixture of shots. Glidetrack.com Glidecam.com

Brent Dunn
Owner / Director / Editor
DunnRight Films
DunnRight Video.com
Video Marketing Toolbox.net

Sony EX-1,
Canon 5D Mark II
Canon 7D
Mac Pro Tower, Quad Core,
with Final Cut Studio

HP i7 Quad laptop
Adobe CS-5 Production Suite





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Mark SuszkoRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Jan 25, 2012 at 7:52:09 pm

Does the 7D have that annoying habit of stopping every so often due to the file structure?


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Joel ServetzRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Jan 25, 2012 at 10:09:38 pm

I certainly would not recommend using a DSLR as the main camera for weddings or any other long form shooting. The file size limitation coupled with the lack of a professional audio interface make them a bad choice. Use a "real" camcorder.

Joel Servetz
RGB Media Services, LLC
Sarasota, Fl
videobyjoel@aol.com
http://www.rgbmediaservices.com


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Brent DunnRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Jan 26, 2012 at 9:11:43 pm

Joel:

Those of us to shoot weddings, many have gone to full DSLR because of the film look you get. It can be done with no issues, but if you are a novice, it's more challenging. We use an external recorder that actually records better audio than a traditional video camera.

I also use a Sony EX-1 on shoots to capture and monitor audio, but most of my shooting is on the 7D and 5D Mk II. You learn and adapt. The results are worth the extra effort.

That being said, as mentioned in the last post, at this time I won't purchase another DSLR. I'd go with one of the hybrids, Panasonic AF 100 being no. 1 for many reasons. The new Canon is great, but not cost effective for event videographers.

Brent Dunn
Owner / Director / Editor
DunnRight Films
DunnRight Video.com
Video Marketing Toolbox.net

Sony EX-1,
Canon 5D Mark II
Canon 7D
Mac Pro Tower, Quad Core,
with Final Cut Studio

HP i7 Quad laptop
Adobe CS-5 Production Suite





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Mark McKeoughRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Jan 31, 2012 at 6:50:43 pm

Thanks for all the input guys. Interesting idea using the EX-1 to capture audio. I suppose I could also use it (or a similar camera) to have a locked=down wide shot I could cut to. I'm still leaning towards the 7D for cost reasons, although the Panasonic cam does look like fun. Also, someone has suggested to me not to go over 16GB for memory cards. Mostly because should something happen to one card, you'll have more footage spread over the rest. Also, I think they may have suggested that fitting so much video data on a large card could cause corruption problems more easily.


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Brent DunnRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Jan 26, 2012 at 9:07:21 pm

Yes, the downside of DSLR is the time limit, around 12 minutes per clip. So you have to find that spot or break and be looking to hit stop and record again. It can be worked around.

I personally would by the Panasonic AF 100 if you have the budget.

Brent Dunn
Owner / Director / Editor
DunnRight Films
DunnRight Video.com
Video Marketing Toolbox.net

Sony EX-1,
Canon 5D Mark II
Canon 7D
Mac Pro Tower, Quad Core,
with Final Cut Studio

HP i7 Quad laptop
Adobe CS-5 Production Suite





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Mark McKeoughRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Feb 2, 2012 at 4:50:24 am

Also, what are people generally using for lenses to shoot weddings? My feeling is that I should use prime lenses and stay away from zoom, since it's manual zoom anyways. Thoughts?


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Brent DunnRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Feb 6, 2012 at 5:08:14 pm

Prime's are great for fixed distances, but when doing live events, your subject generally move and you may be subject to restrictions on where you can set up.

I use primes for prep time and zooms for ceremony & reception. When I am getting B-Roll shots, I'll switch to prime.


I have the Canon L-series 24-70 and 70 - 200. These two will cover about everything you'll need. Then get a 50 macro, and whatever you budget allows.

Brent Dunn
Owner / Director / Editor
DunnRight Films
DunnRight Video.com
Video Marketing Toolbox.net

Sony EX-1,
Canon 5D Mark II
Canon 7D
Mac Pro Tower, Quad Core,
with Final Cut Studio

HP i7 Quad laptop
Adobe CS-5 Production Suite





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Grant WilberRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Feb 15, 2012 at 3:01:11 am

I would say be prepared to have about 60 - 80 GBs if you are doing it by yourself. 100 - 120 if you got an assistant running around with you.

For ceremony I run Lapel mics to recorders that are put in peoples pockets. Wireless systems give you a bit more peace of mind, but I've had and seen so many interface problems with them and I didn't want to invest in a top of the line system as I don't use it that much. Then try to find a soundboard and plug an audio interface (H4N Zoom) into it. Plus a third mic getting the 'room' is good too for a backup backup.

For the reception I just try to get as many audio feeds as possible. In a dream scenario the DJ has powered speakers so I grab an XLR off that, put a mic in front of the speaker and grab just whats coming out, then get a feed from the mixer. Between the Zoom and some recorders I can get at least three feeds usually.

I would recommend to try to upgrade to the 5d. You can get them used right now for around $2,000 then pick up T2i's as backups for around $500. I'm using the T2i right now and am looking to upgrade. If you are using lights then it should be ok, but you really start pushing it if you get up and beyond 1600ISO. Unless you are going for that 'vintage organic' look, its not gonna be all that sharp and pretty grainy. I don't like setting up lights and think it just ruins the atmosphere and just too much planning so I don't accept receptions that are extreme low lighting.

For lens' either the 24 1.4 (crop frame) or 35 1.4 (ff) are gonna be your babies for reception. I pretty much only shoot with the 24mm 1.4 during receptions as there is such low lighting. Other than that the 24 - 70 is a good all purpose. Then maybe a 70 - 200 for reception and some sort of wide lens' when you need it.

Turn around I think is usually around 3 months. Depends though, if you are doing this full time then you could probably get it done faster. But I don't think 3 months is too unreasonable. It's alot of work especially if you do heavy editing and really try to give the client back as much as possible. I try to send them a quick music video first then a piece of video here or there if you feel like they are on your back.


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Vigor OtakuRe: Wedding video workflow advice
by on Sep 17, 2014 at 6:20:34 pm

Good advice!

Bottom line - My workflow:
1) Shoot RAW+JPG. RAW to Card 1 JPG to Card 2. I can always hand off the JPG card to anyone for them to use immediately if necessary.
2) IMPORT : Photo Mechanic
3) EDIT : Capture One Pro 8
Use Sessions so that I can edit in original directories and not have a huge catalog. Also, if I really need to use Photoshop or another plugin because I have a solution that I have used in the past I can.
4) SEND Proofs: Smugmug
5) PRINT: Imageprint
to my Epson 3880.

Check out my quick and dirty workflow for large shoots and weddings here:

You can take a look at http://vigorotaku.blogspot.com/2014/09/workflow-for-weddings.html.
Workflow for Weddings at Vigorotaku.com

I hope that you find this helpful.

Dan at Vigorotaku.com


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