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Price to shoot a promo videos, please help, need quick

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chixwithtrixPrice to shoot a promo videos, please help, need quick
by on Feb 8, 2007 at 4:36:14 pm

I was offered a job to travel 4 hours to it, shoot 4-8 10 minute flights of (4) model airplanes for a company and produce -
1 DVD for each airplane's 2 minute video (edited)
1 DVD with all of the edited videos of the 4 planes on 1 DVD that it can loop
1 DVD with the raw footage

This is going to be show at a large show in April and this company is trying to get some sales off of these videos. They said they were talking to another company and they were going to charge them 1000-2000 a minute for the edited work. I have an estimate going, but after hearing this I do not know what to quote them.

I shoot with an XL2
edit with Premiere and After Affects

How much should I charge for this job?


The second part of the job is possibly having to do film it by Sat Feb 10th when relatives are coming over, along with shooting a separate video with the same people for another company (15min video) and sending my Raw footage to the other company by Monday Feb 12th.

How much would you charge for rush work and handing over raw footage?

I apologize if this is completely confusing, I am somewhat new to the 'paid' market of video so I hope I can get some answers out of this....thank you so much.


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GregRe: Price to shoot a promo videos, please help, need quick
by on Feb 8, 2007 at 10:21:41 pm

You need to figure out what you are worth and what your time is worth. Then figure out how long all of this will take you.

What is your rate for travel? You'll be traveling 8 hours round trip.
What is your shooting package rate?
How long will all of the editing take you?

I can't tell you what to charge, but figure out your hourly rate for editing and your day rate (up to 10 hours for shooting. Your travel day rate should be less than your shooting day rate.

Alot depends on your experience as a shooter and editor.

The second part makes no sense to me. Are you talking about time frames because YOU have relatives coming over? That doesn't concern your client. If you can't do it then don't.

Also, if I were you, I'd draft a contract with payment terms and have them sign it. I would get at least 60% up front, and not turn over any DVDs until you are paid in full.


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Mark SuszkoRe: Price to shoot a promo videos, please help, need quick
by on Feb 9, 2007 at 3:56:19 pm

You guys know how I feel about that thousand per finished minute ballpark estimate being wildly inaccurate. But to the issues:

For the shoot, you bill a day rate plus whatever it costs you to get there. If you have to rent a car, charge for that. If you use your own car, about 25 cets per mile is the last figure I recall charging. You bill from the time you leave the driveway, what's called "portal to portal". Track the miles driven to the shoot and double it to account for the return trip. You can choose whether you bill a lower hourly rate for the driving versus actual on-location time.

As to the DVD's, what you're really doing here if you're smart is editing four sets of clips into one nice video, then taking that program and chopping it into segments, then customizing the titles to fit. You likely have a lot of shared assets between the four pieces, (graphics and music wise) so it's not like you're doing each one completely from scratch, more like working to a template. If you make the master program in this fashion, what remains is to break-out the segments and drag-drop each of these into the DVD authoring program and adding the apropriate menus and rendering it all out. Not a huge deal, so treat ths as a single editing job and bill at your hourly editing rate. Figure eight hours travel toal, two hours to shoot, six to edit, another three to author, maybe you don't charge for rendering time unless you are sitting there babysitting it. With those time estimates times your rate, you have a ballpark figure, ask for one third of that amount up-front, the rest on approval of the master. When you give them an approval copy, put a watermark like a time-code window or your logo over a portion of it so it can't be used as-is, only evaluated. This prevents them using it before thye pay you to give them a clean copy.

Don't know what your rate is?

Short version: if this is what you do for a living, total up all your costs for the year: utilities, expenses, insurance, gear, software, maintenance, expendables, etc. Add an amount you want to put away in savings towards more or better gear. Total that figure. Divide it into 350-some working days (leave out vacations). From this you get a daily amount you need to be bringing in just to BREAK EVEN. Next add a mark-up for your actual PROFIT. Compare this figure to others in your area, try to keep yours near the middle range of those rates. Now, you know what you need to be charging per day and per hour.

I'm going to an awesome indoor RC plane event this weekend in Champaign, Illinois. Check out the e-fest (google search).



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Doug GrahamRe: Price to shoot a promo videos, please help, need quick
by on Feb 12, 2007 at 7:03:01 pm

"if this is what you do for a living, total up all your costs for the year: utilities, expenses, insurance, gear, software, maintenance, expendables, etc. Add an amount you want to put away in savings towards more or better gear. Total that figure. Divide it into 350-some working days (leave out vacations). From this you get a daily amount you need to be bringing in just to BREAK EVEN. Next add a mark-up for your actual PROFIT."

Mark, you left out an important expense: your own salary. Add in a figure that represents what you would want to be paid if you were doing this for someone else. Remember, out of this must come all of your personal living expenses (house, utilities, groceries, retirement account, etc.) Profit is not what you live on, it's what's left over after all the expenses and employees (including you) get paid, and it's what's used to build the business (and pay your stockholders dividends, if you're a public corporation).

If you like, you can split your costs into "direct" and "indirect". Direct costs are things that are associated with a specific client or job...for example, travel expenses, consumables like tape, and your own hours. Indirect costs are those things that you have to pay for whether or not you've got a job lined up...postage, website hosting, utilities, equipment depreciation and maintenance. Direct costs are estimated for each job. Indirect costs are generally tacked on as a percentage markup, based on your estimate of how many jobs you're going to do for the year.

Regards,
Doug Graham


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