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marmels
what is a good setup for a wedding videographer from equipment to programs to props?
on Oct 28, 2006 at 4:08:31 am


what should a wedding videographer have in order to run his busniess smothly, from equipment to programs to props?

thanks

marmels


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zrb123
Re: what is a good setup for a wedding videographer from equipment to programs to props?
on Oct 28, 2006 at 3:20:58 pm

"what should a wedding videographer have in order to run his busniess smothly, from equipment to programs to props?"

The biggist thing one would need to run the buisness is a solid understanding of how to run a buisness. It is some thing that gets over lookes all the time and the buisness suffers because ther person lacs understanding of basic buisness practices.

The biggist thing that helps me is a solid tape cataloging system. Being able to fing your rawfootage and masters is a must.

As far as equipment much of that will be determined by your budget, and by how complex you want to get in shooting wedings.



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Doug Graham
Re: what is a good setup for a wedding videographer from equipment to programs to props?
on Oct 30, 2006 at 7:48:54 pm

Answering that would take a book, not a forum post!

Here's a product you may want to consider: http://www.videouniversity.com/wedbvid.htm

The advice to learn about the business aspects is also excellent. A successful wedding video business requires that you be proficient in three areas:
1. Technical knowledge. You must know some basics about video, audio, and computers.
2. Artistic knowledge. You must know what to shoot and how to shoot it, and then how to edit it into a pleasing program.
3. Business knowledge. You must know something about marketing, planning, accounting, keeping records, contracts, and customer satisfaction.

As far as equipment, there are many excellent choices. Pretty much any of the prosumer or professional 3 chip DV or HDV camcorders can be used for wedding work. There are also many fine choices when it comes to editing software; you need to choose the one that "feels" best to you, so download some demos, or get a hands-on demo from a dealer. Your main choice today is whether to go with the tried and true DV format, or venture into the emerging world of high definition with HDV.

Before working for pay, you need to have backup equipment, and a backup for your backup. One colleague had two of his four PD-170 cameras break down during a shoot last weekend. He would have been in dire straits if he hadn't had two spare camcorders on hand. I'm not saying you need four cameras, but you do need to have a plan for handling the inevitable emergencies.

Basic ceremony coverage requires a camcorder, a fluid head tripod, and a wireless microphone or a digital audio recorder (minidisc or MP3). It's highly desirable to have at least two camera packages, to get multiple points of view. Basic reception coverage requires a camcorder, a small light, and some means of getting steady shots (either good handheld technique, a shoulder brace, a monopod, or a tripod) and good audio (again, the wireless or a recorder, possibly interfaced to the house sound system).

Basic editing requires a late model computer (PC or Mac), an editing software package you like, and some means of authoring and burning DVDs. For professional results, you should also have a printer capable of printing directly on the disc (Epson R-200 or similar). The computer should have 400 GB or more of disk storage in addition to its system drive, and 1GB or more of RAM. HDV is more demanding, and requires the best you can afford in terms of computer speed, power, and disk space. You should also have an audio editing program e.g. Sound Forge, and a good paint program like Photoshop.

If you have no prior video experience, hunt up a local videographers' association and join it. Also, call around and try to find a wedding videographer who's willing to mentor you in return for some "second camera" and grip work.

Regards,
Doug Graham


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DaveA51
Re: what is a good setup for a wedding videographer from equipment to programs to props?
on Nov 19, 2006 at 11:50:28 pm

Finished reading this post and thought to myself "What a generous thoughtful individual. You don't see replys like this too often." Then I saw it was the work of the Panda. Nice to cross paths!

Dave Abrams
Little Pond Productions



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