Apple Final Cut Pro X Debates Forum
Export issues Premiere Pro
Export issues Premiere Pro
by Douglas Morse on Sep 12, 2014 at 10:26:33 am

This article states that Final Cut X is far superior to Premiere/AME in export. Any thoughts http://nofilmschool.com/2014/09/massive-difference-export-quality-fcpx-and-premiere-pro


Re: Export issues Premiere Pro
by Dennis Radeke on Sep 12, 2014 at 11:52:50 am

Noam posted his original article here from which your link is based: http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/335/72500#72629

His original article has several responses by other folks that ask the same questions as I do in the thread above.

At Adobe, we care very much about quality and are always continuously working on it as well as speed. Noam's article was great with findings but had next to nothing in terms of testing methodology, settings, etc. When comparing visual quality, it is essential to have an understanding of what settings you were using. Otherwise, your conclusions may be skewed.

My offer to bring his findings to the Adobe Media Encoder team stands assuming we can get a full understanding of his settings and testing.

Dennis - Adobe guy


Re: Export issues Premiere Pro
by Bret Williams on Sep 12, 2014 at 12:02:24 pm

On my iphone, zooming way in, I can't tell any noticeable difference with the images. The FCP X one looks to have a green cast and possibly is softer. But every blocky artifact I see in both.

I've seen similar side by side tests that conclusively have "proven" that AME is superior to Compressor. I think it's likely settings mismatch/user error.


Re: Export issues Premiere Pro
by Bret Williams on Sep 12, 2014 at 2:27:04 pm

I can see a slight difference on the iMac now, but only on the zoomed in pics. Definitely a little murkier on the Premiere version. But I don't see any text. I find that Apple tends to soften the edges of text in it's h264 implementation.

I also see in his article he's sticking with 2 pass VBR. When doing DVDs, 2 pass VBR is usually optimized for making small files, so not what you want to use to compare with set bit rates. One app might be more conservative than the other, and think certain frames don't need as much data as others. Obviously VBR let premiere down on this test, but perhaps would win on high contrast sharp imagery where compressor/fcpx seems to soften just a bit no matter what you do.


Re: Export issues Premiere Pro
by Craig Seeman on Sep 12, 2014 at 3:56:25 pm

[Bret Williams] "I also see in his article he's sticking with 2 pass VBR."

I didn't see that in the article. Someone else mentions VBR in the comments.


Generally (with some exceptions I believe) Apple's H.264 encoder does best when using High Profile CABAC Single Pass. There is no 2/Multipass option when using those settings. I believe Jan Ozer mentioned that those settings come very close to matching x264.

Adobe BTW is using MainConcept's encoder unless that's changed.

Apple's H.264 encoding had been pretty bad up until recently. That they can get close to x264 quality denotes a significant improvement.

This article is worth reading
http://www.streamingmedia.com/Articles/Editorial/Featured-Articles/First-Look-Apple-Compressor-4.1-94026.aspx

Jan Ozer notes the following on page 2

Overall, at its best, the Apple codec produces better quality than the MainConcept codec, which is the only H.264 codec used in the Adobe Media Encoder, and is also an option in desktop tools like Sorenson Squeeze and Telestream Episode.




Re: Export issues Premiere Pro
by Craig Seeman on Sep 12, 2014 at 2:14:25 pm

There's key information not in there.
Profile Main or High?
Entropy CAVLC or CABAC?
One, Two or Multi Pass?
CBR or VBR?
Key Frame rate?
Processor (can make a difference if the encoder can use Intel QuickSync on i7)

The content itself can have impact as some types of material do better with some settings vs others.
He seems to only focus on data rate.







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