Adobe Premiere Pro Forum
Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
by David Cabestany on Mar 6, 2020 at 4:22:38 pm

Probably I'm going to get flamed for asking this but I want to know what the community at large thinks of Premiere Pro vs. DaVinci or other color grading tools.

Is anyone here using Premiere Pro for their color correction workflow or just for editing?

Thanks!


Re: Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
by Richard DeFinis on Mar 6, 2020 at 4:55:10 pm

We use Premiere for our broadcast commercials however, we've been slowly migrating over to DaVinci for final color grading. Our last two spots were a combination of both Premiere and DaVinci.




Re: Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
by David Cabestany on Mar 6, 2020 at 4:57:38 pm

Thanks Richard.

Can I ask what you see in DaVinci that Premiere does not have?


Re: Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
by Shane Ross on Mar 6, 2020 at 7:09:42 pm

Nodes, for multiple levels of grading.
Power windows. The ability to track those power windows (power windows are areas on the image you can affect while leaving the area outside them alone...and it can automatically track)
16-bit or greater processing (AE might have that, not sure about premiere)
FAR BETTER control over the image...make subtle changes...or drastic ones...with better results. You have to try them both to see what I mean...you can be more subtle in your changes...where Premiere controls make the changes more drastic...more “touchy.” And you can push the limits more in Resolve...more drastic changes...while retaining image quality. Under exposed? Resolve can make it visible with better results that Premiere. MUCH better.
Far more grading interface options (curves, wheels, numerical, slider bars) that affect more of the color data parameters.
Built in image stabilization (no need to go to AE)
Built in Noise Reduction
Super-scale for scaling SD to HD...better results than PPro, and no need to go to AE


It is just a far better color correction app, as that is it’s main purpose. It’s an editor second. Where Premiere is first an editor, and second, has the ability to grade. Resolve blows the socks off Premiere when it comes to grading.

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


Re: Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
by David Cabestany on Mar 6, 2020 at 11:18:06 pm

Got it. Thanks!


Re: Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
by Chris Wright on Mar 7, 2020 at 5:07:21 am

premiere is 32bpc as long as you use 32bpc effects.
it has minimal HDR options and a clunky interface.
it requires multiple timeline layers to do complex grading.

you can use multiply mode to do advanced shadow restore.
it has hue v hue curves now and a version of tracking objects.

its main drawback is lack of ACES which is absolutely brutal
but if you can live with that, or know how to make custom technical luts its doable.


Re: Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
by Jim Curtis on Mar 8, 2020 at 2:49:06 pm

[Shane Ross] "Power windows. The ability to track those power windows (power windows are areas on the image you can affect while leaving the area outside them alone...and it can automatically track)
16-bit or greater processing (AE might have that, not sure about premiere)"


Premiere has mask tracking, and it's gotten a lot faster in the CC 20 (14.x) version. Last time I witnessed Power Windows, they were restricted to quadrangles and ovals. Has that changed?

Pr's masks can be any shape you can make with a pen tool. They interpolate over time, and can be edited after the track. The mask tracking is faster in Pr than in Ae.

Ae has a nice face tracking feature that auto-magically makes separate masks or track points for the face, eyes, and mouth.

https://helpx.adobe.com/after-effects/how-to/face-tracker.html

Pr can work in HDR, which, if I'm not mistaken (I have no experience in HDR yet.), takes 12-bits or more. Ae will indeed work in 16 or 32 bits.

Jim Curtis
jamesphilipcurtis.com

MacPro7,1 24-core - 256 GB RAM - AMD Radeon Pro Vega II 32 GB - 10.15.3


Re: Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
by Richard DeFinis on Mar 6, 2020 at 8:17:00 pm

Shane covered it perfectly!




Re: Is Premiere Pro ripe for color correction in a professional workflow?
by Morten Carlsen on Mar 11, 2020 at 12:33:06 pm

You can achieve whatever you want in both PPRO and Resolve. It just depends on what you feel comfy with. Resolve was initially designed as a color grading software and later added cutting features whereas PPRO was designed to cut and later added color grading features.

If the colorist knows what he's doing and doesn't need too much tracking or root scoping PPRO will do and you won't have to mess with importing into Resolve.

My Advice:

Try grading in PPRO and see if you like the results and Workflow. If not, move on to Resolve and try that. Then make up your mind as to what you prefer !

Best Morten

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