Adobe After Effects Forum
Diagonal line made with a really thin solid is breaking apart and I don't know what to do
Diagonal line made with a really thin solid is breaking apart and I don't know what to do
by Brandon Lanski on Jun 23, 2019 at 9:37:21 pm

So I was asked to make a "Callout" That box is going to have some text in it and that line is supposed to connect to a person so that people understand that the text in the box is connected to that person.


I took a solid layer and scaled it down to a solid line. Why does this happen? Really feeling confused here this has been a problem I couldn't figure out for a long time. Is it an alising thing? What would be a better way to get a thin line like this?

Thanks everyone!















Re: Diagonal line made with a really thin solid is breaking apart and I don't know what to do
by Doyle Lewis on Jun 24, 2019 at 11:29:28 am

What is the resolution of your project? It could be that it is simply too low. Instead of using a solid layer as the line I would just draw a mask line between the two points and use generate stroke effect to give your line the thickness and color you want.

Doyle Lewis,
Assistant Location Manager
Warner Brother Pictures





Re: Diagonal line made with a really thin solid is breaking apart and I don't know what to do
by Cassius Marques on Jun 24, 2019 at 1:53:37 pm

You could try creating a smaller solid instead of scaling it way down.
You could try to continuously rasterize that solid.
You could use effects that simulate that behavior (beam effect, for example).
You could have a shape layer's path with stroke.

Keep in mind that there are several ways to get that done, a bunch of UI scripts already have buttons that automate that process (Motion v2, Duik, etc.) Each one relies on different methods. But usually they create nulls that simplify the links.

Cassius Marques
www.zapfilmes.com


Re: Diagonal line made with a really thin solid is breaking apart and I don't know what to do
by Blaise Douros on Jun 24, 2019 at 4:01:01 pm

Use the Beam effect.





© CreativeCOW.net