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Host Mode to Quicktime File Backup
Host Mode to Quicktime File Backup
by Conall Jones on Feb 3, 2009 at 7:12:57 pm

Hello,

I have been using an external hard-drive in host mode to export footage from the HVX-200 while shooting. I've pulled the necessary footage from the drive and edited what I need. Now I would like to backup all the footage from the host drive on to a separate drive.

Is there an easier way to do this than importing each individual clip through FCP?

Thanks so much for your time and help.




Re: Host Mode to Quicktime File Backup
by John Fishback on Feb 3, 2009 at 9:20:05 pm

If your drive from the shoot has all the mxf data in folders you should copy all the info from the original drive to the new drive. Before you trash anything hook the new drive to fcp and make sure you can access the data.

John

MacPro 8-core 2.8GHz 8 GB RAM OS 10.5.5 QT7.5.5 Kona 3 Dual Cinema 23 ATI Radeon HD 3870
ATTO ExpressSAS R380 RAID Adapter, PDE Enclosure with 8-drive 6TB RAID 5
24" TV-Logic Monitor
Final Cut Studio 2 (up to date)

Pro Tools HD w SYNC IO, Yamaha DM1000, Millennia Media HV-3C, Neumann U87, Schoeps Mk41 mics, Genelec Monitors, PrimaLT ISDN



Re: Host Mode to Quicktime File Backup
by Conall Jones on Feb 4, 2009 at 1:58:00 am

Thanks John,

But I would prefer to save them as quicktime files. Is there a fast way to do that through FCP, rather than importing each individual file?






Re: Host Mode to Quicktime File Backup
by Jeremy Garchow on Feb 4, 2009 at 4:14:37 am

[Conall Jones] "But I would prefer to save them as quicktime files. "

MXF is a more surefire way to archive your media.


Re: Host Mode to Quicktime File Backup
by John Fishback on Feb 4, 2009 at 3:05:09 pm

We archive both the QTs made during Log & Transfer and all the MXFs. I think HD Log from Imagine products will batch digitize QTs from MXFs if you really want just QTs. But, you can always create QTs from the MXFs in the future. There is no quality difference between MXFs and QTs.

John

MacPro 8-core 2.8GHz 8 GB RAM OS 10.5.5 QT7.5.5 Kona 3 Dual Cinema 23 ATI Radeon HD 3870
ATTO ExpressSAS R380 RAID Adapter, PDE Enclosure with 8-drive 6TB RAID 5
24" TV-Logic Monitor
Final Cut Studio 2 (up to date)

Pro Tools HD w SYNC IO, Yamaha DM1000, Millennia Media HV-3C, Neumann U87, Schoeps Mk41 mics, Genelec Monitors, PrimaLT ISDN



Re: Host Mode to Quicktime File Backup
by Trevor Ward on Mar 31, 2009 at 1:57:21 am

Why is MXF a more surefire way to archive the clips?

-trevor ward
Red Eye Film Co.
www.redeyefilmco.com
orlando, fl


Re: Host Mode to Quicktime File Backup
by Jeremy Garchow on Mar 31, 2009 at 2:27:17 am

MXF is a defined 'container' standard and you can ensure as long as MXF is around, there will be NLEs/other production software that can read and use the original MXF media. Quicktime will change, and it will likely change soon with the new version of SNow Leopard. Since MXF is a SMPTE standard, there are certain rules that need to be adhered to. Quicktime can do whatever it wants at any time and change things at a moments notice. The MXF standard, while although can be revised, contains everything an NLE would need including, audio, video, time code, metadata files and any indexing/essence files that help determine what makes up the file and how it was recorded.

Also, since MXF has these rules, it can and will work cross platform across any and all software that is MXF aware. Archiving MXF files will ensure that your media can be edited in the future with whatever wizbang platform/OS/software you are using that day. Quicktime only needs to work on Macs, and it doesn't even need to work the same way on every mac. For example, if you transcode a DVCPro HD file via log and transfer and archive that, then 3 years from now, you are now editing on an AVID on a PC, those DVCPro HD files will be pretty much useless without a third party transcoder/reader. TOday, if you transferred those files to another mac without FCP installed, you couldn't read those files without a 3rd party reader.

One of the beauties of MXF media is that can and will allow cross platform editing with the exact same media. The MXF4mac component allows native mxf editing on a mac without transcoding to what is now a more typical qt file. MXF4mac can also read Avid created MXFs. This means that both Avid mxf media and p2 mxf media can be read by both Avid (PC or Mac) and FCP and the platform/OS starts to become a personal choice instead of a restriction on how you HAVE to collaborate in the post production process.

Very basically MXF is a standardized media container, Quicktime is not.

Hope that makes sense.

Jeremy


Re: Host Mode to Quicktime File Backup
by Conall Jones on Apr 3, 2009 at 4:29:04 pm

Wow. Thank you so much for clarifying all of this Jeremy. I really appreciate it.

Best,

Conall





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