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Keyframing Audio in a Non-Stereo Pair

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Martin Nelson
Keyframing Audio in a Non-Stereo Pair
on Feb 2, 2011 at 7:30:33 pm

This has got to be in the manual, but I can't find it. Sorry.

I'd like to keyframe and ramp up and down a pair of tracks in my timeline. They came from the same master clip, but are not a stereo pair. Is there a way to apply keyframes and make adjustments to both simultaneously? I know I can make adjustments to one and then copy and Paste Attributes to the other, but this approach disallows me from monitoring levels as I go. I'd have to adjust, copy, paste, listen and if the combined levels were off, I'd have to repeat.

Why ask why?

Martin

2 x 2.26 Ghz Quad-Core Intel Xeon
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Jeff Greenberg
Re: Keyframing Audio in a Non-Stereo Pair
on Feb 3, 2011 at 12:52:27 am

Nope.

Set them as a stereo pair. Then they both can be keyframed simultaneously. And you can set the PAN at -1 (top clip left) or 0 (both clips centered.

Best,

Jeff G

Apple Master Trainer
Avid Cert. Instructor DS/MC
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David Roth Weiss
Re: Keyframing Audio in a Non-Stereo Pair
on Feb 3, 2011 at 4:43:45 am

I'm going to ask... Why?

There's no need for two mono tracks. Lose one of them... A mono track is center panned, so no need for two. And, please don't tell that you're doubling up to increase the volume, cuz I'll have to arrest you for illegal anachronism if you're still doing that ancient and evil workaround.

You're not doing that are you Martin?

Hint: if you are, avoid arrest by using the Gain filter.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles
http://www.drwfilms.com

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Business & Marketing and Apple Final Cut Pro forums. Formerly host of the Apple Final Cut Basics, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Martin Nelson
Re: Keyframing Audio in a Non-Stereo Pair
on Feb 3, 2011 at 5:48:03 am

Ah David,

I asked you not to ask why. We all have our own approaches and justifying each move on a forum just slows down the process of finding an answer or, as so often is the case in Final Cut, a workaround. But, since you insist, I'll tell you.

I never said the two tracks were the same, I simply said they were mono. Often, one is boom and one is lav from an interview. I'm working on a very long, very complicated show in what is very much an offline suite. I can't always tell which is the preferred mic through my little Fostex monitors. I think, and I was taught, it's best to give the mixer both channels and let him or her decide, listening through much better monitors, in a much quieter environment and using their much more qualified skill set to decide which channel is appropriate.

Yes, I could disable one channel every time I cut in a dual-mono clip, leaving it for the mixer's later analysis and do my rough mix with only one track, but I find that process time consuming. And I frankly prefer not to have to use the Gain Filter when I don't have to. If I still had the app launched I could go through step by step why I try to use it only when absolutely necessary (one partial reason is because I can't see the waveform in the filter tab of the Viewer), but I think you should already be able to see why I asked you not to ask why: the answer to 'why' is longer than the original question of 'how.'

The ability to ramp the level on more than one track at a time goes all the way back to the earliest of analog mixers. Heck, I used to have to mix live during screenings on a Steenbeck and I could simply push two sliders with two fingers and they'd mix together. It hardly seems much to expect it out a 21st Century professional editing system.

I do think I'll try Jeff's solution of making the tracks a stereo pair and then ramping them.

My intention in this response, David, was absolutely not to sound angry or fed up with my own or the application's limitations or to take potshots at someone honestly just trying to offer a solution. I hope I did not come off that way.

Perhaps I should have inserted some emoticons,

Martin

2 x 2.26 Ghz Quad-Core Intel Xeon
12 GB RAM
OS 10.5.8
ATI Radeon HD 4870
FCP 7.0.2
Quicktime 7.6.6
Avid Media Composer 4.0.2.20


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Keyframing Audio in a Non-Stereo Pair
on Feb 3, 2011 at 6:17:54 am

Now i get it... Sorry you had to explain. And, Heck, I'm glad I don't have to arrest you. :)

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles
http://www.drwfilms.com

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Business & Marketing and Apple Final Cut Pro forums. Formerly host of the Apple Final Cut Basics, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Steve Weslak
Re: Keyframing Audio in a Non-Stereo Pair
on Feb 4, 2011 at 10:25:47 pm

Highlight the two tracks, park the cursor where you want the keyframes, press option-apple-K and keyframes will be created. Go to the next spot and repeat. You now have the keyframes in sync across multiple tracks.



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Martin Nelson
Re: Keyframing Audio in a Non-Stereo Pair
on Feb 4, 2011 at 10:40:58 pm

That far I got on my own. But can I adjust levels on keyframes in both tracks at the same time?

Martin

2 x 2.26 Ghz Quad-Core Intel Xeon
12 GB RAM
OS 10.5.8
ATI Radeon HD 4870
FCP 7.0.2
Quicktime 7.6.6
Avid Media Composer 4.0.2.20


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