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rauno tyyp
adding items into scene
on Aug 13, 2015 at 2:50:28 pm

Hi. I would like to ask how its possible to add for example motorcycle into scene so it looks like i ride it


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Dave LaRonde
Re: adding items into scene
on Aug 13, 2015 at 4:51:42 pm

Use the proper tool for the job. Don't use FCP for something like this. Use Motion or After Effects. FCP is just an editing application, not an effects application.

Dave LaRonde
Promotion Producer
KGAN (CBS) & KFXA (Fox) Cedar Rapids, IA


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rauno tyyp
Re: adding items into scene
on Aug 14, 2015 at 8:30:47 am

i perhaps posted in the wrong thread, but could you explain the details please what effects i exactly have to use with adobe effects to be able to create this kind of thing :=)


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Mark Suszko
Re: adding items into scene
on Aug 14, 2015 at 6:51:06 pm

Rauno, I'll explain a bit, but you may not have the skills for this yet. There are at least three or four ways to do this, but you don't give enough description for us to know what to recommend.

First, you don't say if your motorcycle is a real one or a virtual one: this makes a big difference. You could park a real motorcycle on a dynamo-meter stand or repair stand, and stretch a chromakey green cloth across the wall behind it, then hop on the bike, hunch over the handlebars, and gun it a little bit, while shooting with the frame cropped so you can only see from the waist-up. You bring that footage into final cut or one of the compositing applications that were mentioned, and select the "chroma key" effect, to replace the green screen with the moving background footage you shot from a car or got some other way. Add a strong fan in front of the biker when shooting, and you're most of the way done.

If however, you want to see a wide shot of you and the entire bike, that's more complicated, and you may not have the budget to afford doing it. Be more detailed and specific about the shot you wish to create, and maybe we can help you narrow down the technical requirements a bit more.


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rauno tyyp
Re: adding items into scene
on Aug 15, 2015 at 7:29:46 am

Thanks for answering. im sure i dont have skills indeed, but i would appreciate much if someone still could describe how to achieve it.
im not aware of professional equipments, what else people usually use if they create this kind of difficult scenes which normal people cant achieve with this kind of editing programs

My scene is already filmed where i already am on the running machine, the one you can hold your hands on. So i would like to make scene where i make it dissapear to change it motorcycle and later one, which i wanted to ask later, to add another motorcycle from different scene so they crash with another so i fly off from it lol. To blend two scenes together without this line being visible in between. im not sure does split effect can achieve it or i need something more professional equipment which im not also aware of it. so insight about it would be helpful
thanks


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Mark Suszko
Re: adding items into scene
on Aug 15, 2015 at 2:00:49 pm

What you'r asking for is pretty complicated, and the chance of doing it in a "believable" fashion with the tools and experience available to you are low.
That said, now that I understand the scene, the first thing I can tell you is that what you've shot so far will be next to useless. Changing the bike you are already on would require digitally painting-out the visible parts of the original bike, on a frame-by-frame basis, and replacing the painted-out sections with corresponding images of the "virtual" or replacement bike which were rendered out first by a computer to match the scale, position, and motion characteristics of the original bike, in a process called "hand-rotoscoping". The bike and rider have to be motion-tracked, then the motion tracking data applied to creating a 3-d computer model on a virtual soundstage to match all the real bike moves. This is Hollywood blockbuster-level FX work; I doubt I could pull it off myself.

If your "movie" scene isn't meant to be very realistic, the way I'd approach it would be to take an image of the virtual motorcycle, project and trace that, full-scale, onto a wooden and foam profile prop model, paint this prop a uniform chromakey green color. Where the wheels and tires go, make fake wheels of chromakey blue-painted foam. The wheels don't need to spin, but the steering system has to be able to turn from side to side. Pantomime riding the prop bike while the camera shoots the scene at exactly 90 degrees to the side. Take this footage into photoshop, along with the original still photo of the bike, and by putting them on two aligned layers, erase away the green screen and blue screen parts of the bike to replace them with the virtual model bike and rider. for every frame. Thirty frames per second of finished video. Yeah, that's many hours of work. Export the result with an alpha channel or a new chromakey background, and NOW you can use it in Apple Motion or Adobe AfterEffects to key into stock footage of the moving background. The wheels would be done as their own independent layer, so you can control their rate of spinning.

The absolute easiest way I can think of for you to do something like this, though it will look very cartoon-like and flat, is for you to just strike a few still poses on the real bike, take that into photoshop, remove all the background, and paint-in a new bike underneath you, with the wheels on a separate layer. Make a scrolling background in Apple Motion at the correct angles, and layer the still of you, the bike and the wheels into that composition. Motion lets you animate the spin of the wheels easily, and even make the entire bike and rider seems to bump up and down while traversing the "road". But again, this will be a very flat, Hanna-Barbara, "Flintstones" kind of animation look. Maybe for your entertainment needs, that's enough. Look at something like Toon Boom animation to see if that is something you can work with.

One last idea: buy Poser3-d. Make an animated 3-d version of yourself by applying photos of your head to a 3-d body model. Buy the virtual motorcycle model from turbosquid.com. Animate the whole thing in Poser 3-d or another 3-d animation app. Gives you the most flexibility.

Best of luck to you!


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