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Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing

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Michael Denora
Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing
on Aug 16, 2012 at 2:30:12 pm

I have a corporate assignment to create an industrial video using existing footage that only is available on a dvd previously produced by the client. I need to re-edit and add some new title screens and voice-over using fcpx.
What program and setting will give me the same/best quality that I see on the dvd? I tried Aimersoft and created a .mov and a mp4 movie, but both looked softer than the original dvd quality.

Do you always lose quality ripping a dvd?

thanks


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Ryan Holmes
Re: Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing
on Aug 16, 2012 at 3:03:55 pm

DVD's aren't terribly high quality to begin with. (5-8Mbps). It can also matter what codec you rip the DVD into when making a mov. If going to FCPX I would use ProRes.

I use MPEG Streamclip for DVD ripping. It's free. http://www.squared5.com

Ryan Holmes
http://www.ryanholmes.me
vimeo.com/ryanholmes


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Michael Denora
Re: Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing
on Aug 16, 2012 at 6:16:51 pm

Thanks for your help.
I can't make Streamclip work on my 10.8 because the quicktime mp2 converter will not run on mountain lion.

I'm trying imedia converter - ever hear of it?

If not, is going from dvd file to .mov and then importing into fcpx which converts again to pro res 422 just too many conversions?

Thanks


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Mark Suszko
Re: Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing
on Aug 16, 2012 at 3:09:30 pm

A dvd is mpeg 2, which, at the highest data rate, is good enough for high def, but on most DVD's they use a lower data rate to get more running time. You're never going to get any higher rez than what you started out with. If the DVD was made using lower rez footage, well, you get what you get. Mind you, in a bit-for-bit digital transfer, you get the exact same ones and zeroes as the original. In a conversion, some averaging of the ones and zeros is happening, and thus you will get some losses. Usually they are not significant, unless you are converting to a lower-re codec instead of a higher-rez one.

Most of us here probably use the very good free programMPEG Streamclip to convert DVD's to mov files for an FCP edit. When you rip the DVD, rip it to Pro Res 422 codec, and edit using that.


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Michael Denora
Re: Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing
on Aug 16, 2012 at 4:02:27 pm

Thanks for your help.
I would be happy with the same quality as the client's dvd (tough looking at it when my only experience has been dslr HD). I couldn't find the ProRes422 in Aimersoft.
Do you know if streamclip runs on MountaionLion?

Thanks again


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Rafael Amador
Re: Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing
on Aug 16, 2012 at 4:55:20 pm

I don't know Aimersoft, but if Prores is not an option doesn't sounds like a much profesional option.
i think Mountain Lion shouldn't have problem to make the conversion.
rafael

http://www.nagavideo.com


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Mark Suszko
Re: Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing
on Aug 16, 2012 at 7:06:36 pm

Michael:

Every station has differing requirements. You'll want to call their traffic department or the engineer's office to get the specs, because I find the sales guys at stations usually don't know this stuff.

If you have real scopes, use them as you do your edit. Otherwise, use the virtual scopes that come with FCP to monitor video levels. You can try to cheat and use the broadcast safe filter, but that's not always good enough. Audio wise, the requirements vary as well, I usually keep my peaks at minus 12 Db and that seems to work locally. You must check with the station to see what they want, and if they want steero, mono, surround, closed captions, etc.

You will want to try and send the finished spot using FTP upload directly to the station, or to a service that mass-distributes spots to stations like DGit.com or pathfire. Those places will usually accept a file burned to a DVD data disk or blu-ray disk, (typically an mov h.264 file) as well as tape, and they will then do any further conversion for you, but usually someone has to pay for that, and, most editors prefer to have more direct control over their product than to hand it off to others to change levels, etc.

Be ready for a few rejections at first, until you figure it all out.


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Michael Denora
Re: Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing
on Aug 16, 2012 at 9:45:28 pm

I found an imedia converter that runs on 10.8 and converts to ProRes422.
I tried several settings (high quality, HQ, letting fcp transcode, importing w/o transcoding) and the results all seem the same. Slightly lower quality when compared to watching the dvd file in mplayer.
So is that the case, ripping from a dvd is producing a slightly lower quality from original, or am I missing something. This is a 640x480 vid shot probably 10 years ago and I'm comparing it to what I'm getting from the Nikon d800 1080 files.


Ugh!!!


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Rafael Amador
Re: Ripping a dvd for FCPX editing
on Aug 17, 2012 at 12:19:34 am

Distribution codecs are made to look well on display.
production codecs are made to keep the integrity of the video information.
Yes, is true that some times a DVD looks better on the screen than the original media (DV for example) even if they are more compressed.
But you have a DVD and what you have to do is to try to rip the most quality you can, and the only way is to convert the MPEG-2 without adding further compression.
Technically the best option to do that is converting the stuff to 8b Uncompressed.
going to Prores would add some compression, but impossible to tell visually and would simplify the workflow.


[Michael Denora] "This is a 640x480 vid shot probably 10 years ago and I'm comparing it to what I'm getting from the Nikon d800 1080 files."
The development in video has been so huge in the last 10 years, that comparing a film from that time with a film from today is like comparing a car from 2012 with a car from the 50's.
The only reason to use SD on an HD production today is when contains stuff interesting enough to justify the difference in quality. So when the stuff is unique and can't be remade.
rafael

http://www.nagavideo.com


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