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Organizing footage within the scratch disk using Log and Transfer

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Julian Petschek
Organizing footage within the scratch disk using Log and Transfer
on Sep 12, 2011 at 3:16:20 am

Hello,

I am editing in FCP 7 and using log and transfer to transcode footage from raw canon 7D clips into ProRes 4444, but that info is kind of unnecesary. when I transcode a clip it automatically places the new clip inside my scratch disk under a folder it creates with the same name as my project name. I want my scratch disk to be organized with a folder hierarchy such as:
capture scratch
transcoded files
day 1
file.001
file.004
file.024
day 2
file.003
file.023
file.050

rather than:

capture scratch
project name
file
file
file
file
file
file

I found that you can create bins in your browser and set them as your logging bin and then the clips will automatically be placed in that bin in the browser - but I want a FOLDER in the FINDER to be created that corresponds with the bin in the browser.

any suggestions?


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Shane Ross
Re: Organizing footage within the scratch disk using Log and Transfer
on Sep 12, 2011 at 4:11:17 am

Import everything in a project. Then organize how you want in the finder....then make a NEW project and bring in the folders the way you organized them.

There is no way to force the capture scratch to make new folders that match the bins you make.

Shane

GETTING ORGANIZED WITH FINAL CUT PRO DVD...don't miss it.
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Dave LaRonde
Re: Organizing footage within the scratch disk using Log and Transfer
on Sep 12, 2011 at 11:34:04 pm

...and here's something to keep in mind for the next edit: ProRes 4444 is overkill for 8-bit H.264 footage from a 7D. It does NOT improve the image quality at all. You're simply wasting valuable storage space.

Good ol' ProRes 422 is more than adequate. It's as 10-bit codec like 4444, and you can render the footage and re-render it six generations deep before you notice any difference in the picture. How many times would you be rendering six times over? Never?

And if you don't intend to render anything more than two generations, you can use ProRes LT and your images will still look great.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


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