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Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....

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Fredy Schwerdtner
Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....
on May 15, 2011 at 3:08:45 pm

I've got the material for a 85 minutes video with many scenes. All recorded with 2 cameras. I've already did a multicam sequence also synced on each scene. Newbie Question: Should I rought cut each scene in a sequence and later copy and paste it to "a final sequence" or should I cut straight to the final sequence ?
It's my first time with too many separated scenes !

Thanks in advance.
Fredy

MacBook Pro 17"
2.5 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
4GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM
(2) External HD LaCieMac (400/800 FW and USB)with 500GB -(2) USB External HD Western Digital (in cases) with 750GB
OS X 10.6.5
Final Cut Studio "3"


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John Pale
Re: Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....
on May 15, 2011 at 3:33:52 pm

Initially, I would cut separately, until you have them pretty decently cut, then start stringing scenes together to address how they flow with each other.


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dan crouch
Re: Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....
on May 15, 2011 at 3:34:35 pm

Hi Fredy,
What do you actually mean by 'final' scene.
Piecing together scenes for a movie is quite a long process.
personally, I start by doing rough cuts for each scene.
lay down the performance as per script, piecing together the scene from start to finish. Then when the scene is roughed out, go back and play with the cuts and the performances, better cuts, go closer wider etc.

When I think it's working pretty well I go on to next scene. For me to have a wide view of the film as a whole, will allow me to understand the details needed within each scene, if that makes sense?
It is I think counter productive to fine-cut a scene, before knowing where it's heading.

Everyone is different of course, but this works for me.
I've only cut one big movie but I use this when cutting docs.

Cheers,
Dan.


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Fredy Schwerdtner
Re: Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....
on May 15, 2011 at 3:50:41 pm

Thanks Dan & John. You two pretty much said the same and exactly what I was thinking. I will have a hard job but challenging. All was recorded in green screen. I think I will leave the keying for the final sequence where I will be able to take more care about the images. After that make a re-check of the audio and finally the color correction if there is a need.

Thank you very much.

MacBook Pro 17"
2.5 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
4GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM
(2) External HD LaCieMac (400/800 FW and USB)with 500GB -(2) USB External HD Western Digital (in cases) with 750GB
OS X 10.6.5
Final Cut Studio "3"


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....
on May 15, 2011 at 3:50:01 pm

One of the great things about FCP is that it allows editors to work in many, many ways, and the fact that it has always allowed editors to use multiple open sequences to cut a single project has always been one of it's great strengths. That paradigm was ultimately copied in Avid and Premiere, but it wasn't in either NLE for quite a number of years after they came to market.

Cutting individual scenes in their own fresh timelines can be an advantage for several reasons: you can cut quickly without fear of changing the sync of other scenes; you can render the entire scene quickly if necessary without making any selections; and you don't have to navigate up and down a large timeline, so it can be quicker.

It's really an individual preference however, and you will find it works better with some material than others, just be sure you don't leave many of your sequences open, as that hinders performance and can lead to kernel panic crashes if your available RAM happens to dip below the amount of resources needed to run all available open applications and FCP.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles
http://www.drwfilms.com

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Business & Marketing and Apple Final Cut Pro forums. Formerly host of the Apple Final Cut Basics, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Fredy Schwerdtner
Re: Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....
on May 15, 2011 at 4:00:57 pm

Hi David.
Here you are again in one of my posts and once more with good tips about the viceras of FCP.

Thanks. Have a nice weekend.

MacBook Pro 17"
2.5 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
4GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM
(2) External HD LaCieMac (400/800 FW and USB)with 500GB -(2) USB External HD Western Digital (in cases) with 750GB
OS X 10.6.5
Final Cut Studio "3"


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....
on May 15, 2011 at 4:05:30 pm

[Fredy Schwerdtner] "Here you are again in one of my posts and once more with good tips about the viceras of FCP.
"


Thanks! You're quite welcome as always Fredy - it only goes to show that you ask good questions.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles
http://www.drwfilms.com

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Business & Marketing and Apple Final Cut Pro forums. Formerly host of the Apple Final Cut Basics, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Michael Aranyshev
Re: Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....
on May 15, 2011 at 6:17:13 pm

Large number of sequences in a project will make the project size huge pretty fast. Big projects are slow to open and save and somewhat more prone to corruption.

Sooner or later you will have to put all scenes in one sequence and then recut most of the scenes if not all to match general timing, pacing and duration of the whole piece. Why not to start working on the whole thing? Make rough assembly first following the script but not caring about pace and duration first. Then watch it and analyze the story. Work on the story until it makes perfect sense and only when satisfied polish the cut for pace, timing and duration.

Don't let sequences and bins multiply uncontrollably. Resist the temptation to keep endless versions of the cuts — at the end of the project you need to deliver only one. Keep one sequence for the cut, one sequence for all the takes for a scene you are currently cutting and one sequence for cutaways and outtakes. Make sure to purge the latter two sequences after you're done with a scene. Don't make "great takes", "good takes", "so-so takes" sequence or bins. There are plenty of ways to mark and label takes in FCP and use sorting feature in the browser to quickly find what you need. Keep the project simple — it will be easier for FCP but what's more important it will be easier for you to see the whole picture.


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Andrew Rendell
Re: Cutting a movie with many, many scenes ....
on May 15, 2011 at 8:22:37 pm

I do like to keep previous versions, particularly when I've exported copies for, say, the producer to view (that way I can go back to them if I need to respond to a comment about a shot, say, 6 minutes in and the timing has changed in the intervening time, so that shot is no longer at 6 min). But I agree with keeping your main project tidy - make another project for those backups and copy your sequences into it when you want to hold that version. I've been known to save my sequence in that way daily when I'm getting near the end of a big edit, and although it's rare that I've needed it, it's the occasion that you don't bother that it turns out that it would have been really useful to have done so...

I prefer to do rough cuts of each scene as separate sequences before putting them together, as my most frequent employment is docs and we often restructure and swap the order of scenes in the edit so it's handy to have the sequences separate until the structure is agreed. I'll then do the fine cut on a complete timeline.

I do sometimes have one extra sequence somewhere where I can chuck "useful" or "interesting" bits and pieces. It can come in handy when doing extras for a web site or DVD. Again, have it as another project otherwise it'll distract you when you should be concentrating on other stuff.


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