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Mixing 1440 and 1920

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Brad Ballew
Mixing 1440 and 1920
on Feb 22, 2011 at 7:50:45 pm

I am shooting with a Canon Xha1s and a Canon 7d.. I heard somewhere that when mixing 1440 and 1920 that you should convert the 1440 to pro res 1920 through compressor. Is that right? All I want to know is what is the best method mixing these two formats while retaining the best quality.

I might add that I do not shoot to tape. I have a MRC1K hooked to my XHA1S that lets me shoot to CF. So when I bring it to the computer I have to clipwrap my m2t files before I can send them through compressor.

Also, I am ultimately wanting this to go to Blu Ray.


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Michael Gissing
Re: Mixing 1440 and 1920
on Feb 22, 2011 at 9:14:02 pm

I would recommend converting the HDV to ProRes422 to match the 7D footage.


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Frank Giardina
Re: Mixing 1440 and 1920
on Feb 23, 2011 at 1:06:15 am

Hi... I use the A1s and 7D also. It's not easy for sure... I haven't been able to capture the HDV footage Pro-Res 422 yet, space limitations, but it's my understanding Pro-Res across the board is the way to go.

Best I need another DLSR regards :)

Frank Giardina
17 Video Production


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Brad Ballew
Re: Mixing 1440 and 1920
on Feb 23, 2011 at 3:39:55 am

So anytime I tried to convert to pro res AND change the aspect ration to 1920, I ended up with jaggies in my video. Then I brought my quicktime wrapped m2t files into fcp and just dropped them on my 1920x1080 sequence. FCP seems to be handling it just fine. I figure FCP can do the converting itself. I thought I had read somewhere that someone else decided that was the best workflow for them when faced with the same issue. I did a short test shoot and will post a link when I have it ready in case any one else is curious on how good the results are.


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Mixing 1440 and 1920
on Feb 23, 2011 at 5:45:31 am

Brad,

I think you're confusing scaling 1440x1080 video to full raster 1920x1080 ProRes, with Capturing 1440x1080 video as full raster 1920x1080 ProRes via a capture card.

Capturing at full raster is essentially like recording the full raster image, there is no scaling involved.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles
http://www.drwfilms.com

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Business & Marketing and Apple Final Cut Pro forums. Formerly host of the Apple Final Cut Basics, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Brad Ballew
Re: Mixing 1440 and 1920
on Feb 23, 2011 at 3:19:37 pm

David,

So are you saying that if you capture an HDV signal from tape via a capture card into FCP that it captures it full 1920X1080? Is wrapping M2T files in a quicktime wrapper using CLIPWRAP essentially the same thing? I was a little confused since I am not capturing through a card, but instead dragging files off of a MRC1K. FCP won't log and capture the clips either before or after I wrap them in CLIPWRAP. However, importing the quicktime wrapped M2T files into FCP and then dropping them on a Pro Res 1920x1080 sequence seems to have worked the best for me.

I am not savvy on exactly how FCP handles then 1440 clip on a 1920 sequence, but it doesn't seem to be giving me any issues. I test a quick test shoot yesterday with both my 7D and XH-A1S, and mixed them both in a 1920 sequence just how I described above. I went through the whole process sending the sequence to Color and back and then burning it to Blu Ray. When I played it on my 50 inch plasma, I didn't notice any artifacts or jaggies like I got when I would try and convert the m2t clips via compressor.

I loaded the video on Vimeo and you can see it here if you are interested.


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Mixing 1440 and 1920
on Feb 23, 2011 at 3:52:47 pm

[Brad Ballew] "So are you saying that if you capture an HDV signal from tape via a capture card into FCP that it captures it full 1920X1080?"

That is one way to do it... And, those who do capture it full raster swear by it, because once the material is properly recorded full raster 1920x1080 there are apparently fewer aliasing issues (jaggies) that can enter into the workflow later. There are times when I wish my clients had, as I do see aliasing from time to time when they attempt to produce DVDs from 1440 material, and depending of the camera they shot with, it can be hard to get rid of.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles
http://www.drwfilms.com

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Business & Marketing and Apple Final Cut Pro forums. Formerly host of the Apple Final Cut Basics, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Brad Ballew
Re: Mixing 1440 and 1920
on Feb 23, 2011 at 4:48:45 pm

I am curious then, how does my current workflow compare? If I wrap my M2T files in a quicktime wrapper with Clipwrap and send them straight to FCP is it essentially doing the same thing? Since I am not actually converting my video but rather making it readable via the wrapper, I am experiencing no generation loss before it hits FCP. So then is FCP handling my wrapped M2T files like it does the video being captured from tape?


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Mixing 1440 and 1920
on Feb 23, 2011 at 5:09:50 pm

You should be fine Brad. However, there's lots of room for variation between different cameras, so there are no guarantees that are 100% seamless in all cases. If it looks good now you're doing the best you can...

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles
http://www.drwfilms.com

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Business & Marketing and Apple Final Cut Pro forums. Formerly host of the Apple Final Cut Basics, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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