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Dan Magnafichi
JVC Cameras and FCP
on Sep 27, 2009 at 6:45:34 pm

Hello All, long time listener, first time caller. I'm buying a new FCP Studio NLE system and have 2 options in mind for a camera.

Option 1: JVC GY-HD 200 - This gives me the option to record on tape and with the addition of a DR-HD 100 Hard Disk Drive simultaneously record to the drive with a FCP "Native" Quick Time wrap around so that supposedly I can copy clips directly into my FCP browser and/or timeline. Has anyone out there had any experience with using this configuration?

Option 2: JVC GY-HD 700 - This camera has gotten rave reviews from many sources and does the Quick Time wraparound in the camera and records to SDHC cards only. As an old dog trying to learn new tricks I'm still a little leery about not having a tape back-up.

I would greatly appreciate any input from people who have had experience with either of these cameras and integration with Final Cut Pro 7.


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Phil Balsdon
Re: JVC Cameras and FCP
on Sep 27, 2009 at 11:17:30 pm

I use a JVC HD111E and a DR HD100 with Final Cut 6.

My primary reason for buying the camera was its broadcast style ergonomics.

The workflow though is extremely efficient and proved to be another great benefit, Quicktime files import directly from the DR HD100 to the media drive (drag and drop) and the camera tapes become a secure backup and archive. Occasionally I've imported direct from the tape which I usually do as Pro Res SQ (See my blog for workflow http://www.steadi-onfilms.com.au/vlog/?p=61 ). (Check to see if the DR HD100 software will record 720p 60 / 50 to Quicktime, mine doesn't when using a JVC HD 251E, otherwise you'll have to record mtf and unwrap using Clipwrap http://www.clipwrap.com/ ).

Editing in Pro Res is more efficient and renders faster than HDV.

Until a more efficient and secure archiving system is available I prefer the tape / hard drive system (the HD DR100 records the same timecode as the tape). Currently archiving takes zero time and costs me the price of tape stock (which gets budgeted to the job) and adds the security of a dual record. Admittedly though the few record problems I've had were tape based and since changing to strictly using only one brand of tape (JVC HD Pro) I've had no problems at all.

The JVC-GY HD700 seemed to me to be very similar quality images and at this level of shooting (corporate and online video) I couldn't see any financial reason to upgrade my camera especially considering the archiving changes I'd also have to make.

Cinematographer, Steadicam Operator, Final Cut Pro Post Production.
http://www.steadi-onfilms.com.au/


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Rafael Amador
Re: JVC Cameras and FCP
on Sep 28, 2009 at 2:50:21 am

Hi dan,
if for you the picture quality is not the main issue, then go for the JVC GY-HD 200.

[Phil Balsdon] "The JVC-GY HD700 seemed to me to be very similar quality images and at this level of shooting (corporate and online video) I couldn't see any financial reason to upgrade my camera especially considering the archiving changes I'd also have to make. "

I haven't tried the JVC-GY HD700, but If the two cameras yields a similar picture quality, then JVC had done an awful job with this camera.
You simply can not compare HDV with the EX codec used in the JVC-GY HD700.
You can not compare a 1440x1080 at 25Mbps with a full 1920x1080 picture at 35Mbps.
The only thing that distinguish this camera from the SONY EX-3 is the size and kind of the captors (1/2"CMOS vs 1/3'CCDs).
Best,
rafael


http://www.nagavideo.com


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Neil Sadwelkar
Re: JVC Cameras and FCP
on Sep 28, 2009 at 4:11:28 am

The HM 700 shoots to SD cards only. Or to SD and SxS with an optional adapter. So there's no safety of a tape backup. But SD cards have gotten rather reliable these days.

The HM 700 mov or mp4 workflow seems simpler than the older JVC HD111,/250/251 etc HDV workflow. Although those cameras provided you a tape backup.

The newer HM700 records to 1920x1080 full raster 35Mbps over the older HDV 1440x1080 25Mbps. Depending on your application, the extra data bandwidth will provide visibly better images.

-----------------------------------
Neil Sadwelkar
neilsadwelkar.blogspot.com
twitter: fcpguru
FCP Editor, Edit systems consultant
Mumbai India


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Phil Balsdon
Re: JVC Cameras and FCP
on Sep 28, 2009 at 8:12:31 am

I think what you'll find is all the JVC cameras have 1280 x 720 3CCD true progressive scan block.

Any 1080i is created from the this within the camera.

The HDV is a short 6 frame GOP.

HD SDI output allows 4.2.2 recording to another device.



Cinematographer, Steadicam Operator, Final Cut Pro Post Production.
http://www.steadi-onfilms.com.au/


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Dan Magnafichi
Re: JVC Cameras and FCP
on Sep 28, 2009 at 6:47:00 pm

Thanks Phil, I watched your blog about importing the video from the camera/tape and that really helped me a lot. By importing in this manner to the ProRes format can you then edit the clips directly into the timeline or is there another step involved? Also, have you had any of the problems described in other responses concerning the DR-HD100? Specifically the Audio and Support problems. My equipment dealer would not sell me the GY-HD200 bundled with the Firestorm drive because of reported problems by other users.


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Phil Balsdon
Re: JVC Cameras and FCP
on Sep 28, 2009 at 9:52:14 pm

The tutorial on my blog shows the complete set up, just start editing into the timeline as Pro Res.

I have read about the problems with audio and the DR HD100 but I never had the problem so I'm unable to comment. I've shot a lot of interview material for other clients who have their own edit facilities without one complaint. I'm also in PAL land maybe that has something to do with it.

The process I describe on the blog avoids the HDV Quicktime format so I'm again unsure about the audio problem that some people have.

At worst from what I've read it doesn't happen when recording as M2T. You could always use Clipwrap to rewrap the M2T files as Quicktimes, although I'm not sure if that would re-introduce the problem, can't see why though as it's not a conversion, just a re-wrap process that's very fast.

Cinematographer, Steadicam Operator, Final Cut Pro Post Production.
http://www.steadi-onfilms.com.au/


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Tony Creech
JVC 200 and SDHC
on Mar 5, 2010 at 4:08:06 pm

I would like to convert our JVC HD200 cameras with the SxS adaptor but I don't want to buy the expensive memory cards. Will the SDHC express card adaptors work in the JVC KA-MR100G SxS adaptor?


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mike simpson
Re: JVC 200 and SDHC
on Mar 25, 2010 at 9:58:08 am

I'm currently testing the KA MR100G for our GY HD251 cameras so was wondering exactly the same thing having seen the adapters for those using EX3s and the like.
I contacted MxM regarding their adapters and got this response:

Unfortunately, this recorder has only PCI-e interface, not USB 2.0 therefore will not accept any adapters like MxM which are USB 2.0 interface.
This is an unfortunate situation for you, but that is the way JVC decided to use Sony’s SxS technology.

You can’t use our MxMs with a JVC…
The reason you have to use Sony SxS is that your recorder will only accept SxS because it is based and preinstalled with Sony’s priority driver.

There are PCI-e express34 adapters but none of them will work on your JVC as they will not recognize as a SxS without this abovementioned driver from Sony.


SO. It would seem the answer to your question, and mine, would be no.

Mike


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