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Coping with planned obsolescence 2

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Walter Miale
Coping with planned obsolescence 2
on May 16, 2017 at 3:42:42 am

In general, does it make sense to maintain obsolete but unequaled applications like Eudora and PageMaker and maybe even Photoshop CS2 on a Mac system today, using either multiple Macs or multiple booting partitions?

Not only are these great apps, but learning new apps doesn't come easy to some of us.


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John Rofrano
Re: Coping with planned obsolescence 2
on May 16, 2017 at 12:05:02 pm
Last Edited By John Rofrano on May 16, 2017 at 12:07:25 pm

[Walter Miale] "Not only are these great apps, but learning new apps doesn't come easy to some of us."
This is really your gating factor and a question that only you can answer. How much are you capable of learning?

I can give you my answer but I am attracted to all things shiny and new: 😉

Eudora? I use the Mac Mail client on all of my devices (Mac Pro, MacBook Pro, iPad Pro 13", & iPhone 6). I see no reason to use a 3rd party mail client. Maybe at one time there was a need, but today... not really. I have the same mail client on all of my devices. Eudora is no longer under development. It may have vulnerabilities that no one is going to fix! (and most computer hacks are perpetrated through email... just ask John Podesta) Eudora is dead. Let it go.

PageMaker? That was a "desktop publishing" app right? (lol - i'm joking I use to used it too back in the day) I'm pretty sure most word processors have the same capabilities. Apple Pages (now free) actually has a "page layout" mode (File --> Convert to Page Layout) that acts the same as a desktop publishing app allowing you to place "copy" and images anywhere on the page. Is it as full featured as PageMager? Probably not, but unless you are running a magazine (in which case you would probably be using Adobe In-Design anyway) you really don't need it. Like Eudora, PageMaker is no longer under development. Let it go.

Photoshop CS2 we have already discussed in other threads. There is the totally awesome Affinity Photo, or Pixelmator (which is another great alternative) that can handle most/all of the tasks you probably use Photoshop CS2 for. These newer apps have far more features (like erasing foreground objects and magically filling in the background) that you might benefit from. I get that you might not need these features, but most photo editing apps are laid out the same and work pretty much the same so this shouldn't be too big a learning curve.

Something to consider:

It is a different world out there today. Hackers are waging cyber wars. Do you really want to be running a 5 year old OS that has vulnerabilities that hackers can use to literally hold you hostage like the WannaCry ransomware that is encrypting Windows computers this week and requesting $300 in bitcoin to get your data back? Or do you want to be running a modern OS that is regularly patched to keep you safe from such criminals. This is not a theoretical discussion of someone "could" hack your computer... this is playing out this week all over the world and bringing government agencies to their knees because an astonishing number are still running the long abandoned Windows XP because they don't want to change because they have old apps. This is the exact topic of this thread and something to very seriously consider.

I think the days of keeping an old Mac around to use an old program are numbered. Those computers should not be placed on a network that has internet access. It's just getting too dangerous. There could be an exploit in an older version of Chrome that you are forced to use because of the age of your OS that will compromise the safety of the data on your Mac. Do you really want to risk that?

So for me there is only one direction and that's move forward. As I said, I keep a Snow Leopard partition around to use DVD Studio Pro because there is no newer substitute. The entire industry has abandoned making DVD's while the public is still demanding DVD's so you are between "a rock and a hard place". But other than running software for which there is no substitute, I would not risk it. Take the time to learn the new program and move forward. It is a safer approach and you might even find new features that make life a lot easier.

Change is always difficult. As we get older learning new things becomes more difficult. So it's a real challenge, I get it. But deciding to change is a personal choice. I still love learning new things. It keeps me sharp and relevant, but I'm a gear head. Your mileage may vary. ;-)

~jr

http://www.johnrofrano.com
http://www.vasstsoftware.com



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greg janza
Re: Coping with planned obsolescence 2
on Jun 4, 2017 at 7:44:50 am

[John Rofrano] "Take the time to learn the new program and move forward. It is a safer approach and you might even find new features that make life a lot easier."

This is great advice. Computers are a convenience that require the user to embrace change. The rewards to staying current with OS updates and software updates are endless.

Adobe Premiere 2017.1.1
Windows 10 Pro
Samsung SSD 850 EVO system
Samsung SSD 850 EVO Adobe cache
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970
OWC Thunderbay 12t x 2 in Raid10 configuration (thru Storage Spaces and Disk Management)


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Walter Miale
Re: Coping with planned obsolescence 2
on Jun 11, 2017 at 1:56:06 am

Thanks very much for the savvy and really useful reply. Sorry for the delay getting back to you.

As soon as I get Mail figured out, I'll boot mainly from El Capitan.

Will I have to buy a new app for Pages? (Mine is Pages 09; runs on Snow Leopard.) A quick web check didn't answer this.

I have 20 years of email stored on Eudora. Any tips for transferring some of it?

Thanks again.

Walter


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Kirk Pitts
Re: Coping with planned obsolescence 2
on Jun 19, 2017 at 1:12:09 am

Apple Mail used to import Eudora but I don't know if it still does.
Apple mail doesn't handle large databases of mail nearly as well as Eudora did. I loved Eudora myself. I tried postbox for a while. It is a mix of the two, sorta, but I stuck with mail.
My school district is pushing microsoft but I have NO desire to use it.

Kirk Pitts.
video amateur.
Personal skateboard and band historian. ;)


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Patrick Donegan
Re: Coping with planned obsolescence 2
on Aug 20, 2017 at 5:43:53 am

If one has Pages 09, one needs to delete the App - then trash it
then go to the App Store and select it there.

I just had to do that on a client's KeyNote, as it was not playing nice with Photos.

PS - I have another client that refuses to get off Eudora because that is the only eMail client
that he has found that he can edit the Subject line in order to sort his eMail how he wants it and needs it.

FCP X 10.2.3 - user since FCP 1.25
iMac mid 2011, MBA mid 2012
iPhone 4
HVX-200, Shure wireless mic
Miller Solo tripod
Advanta-Jib


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John Rofrano
Re: Coping with planned obsolescence 2
on Aug 20, 2017 at 12:26:37 pm

[Walter Miale] "Will I have to buy a new app for Pages? (Mine is Pages 09; runs on Snow Leopard.) A quick web check didn't answer this."
I still have iWork '09 (Pages, Numbers, & KeyNote) running fine on macOS Sierra. You can buy the new version if you'd like or stick with the old versions which still works fine.

~jr

http://www.johnrofrano.com
http://www.vasstsoftware.com



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