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C100 - Slow Motion workflow in Premiere

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Gavin Williams
C100 - Slow Motion workflow in Premiere
on Feb 20, 2014 at 1:42:07 pm

OK so I know the C100 does't shoot at higher frame rates for smooth slow motion - yet I see people talking about shooting at 50i and then importing on to a 25p timeline in premiere which gives you a pretty good slow motion.

However I have tried this technique and it's not happening? It remains in real time? Does anyone know the correct workflow for this?

Thanks

Gavin


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Todd Terry
Re: C100 - Slow Motion workflow in Premiere
on Feb 20, 2014 at 3:54:15 pm

Well yes, but you can't just drop it on the time line, there are at least a couple more hoops that you have to jump through.

But yes, it works... In the PAL world you can do a 50% slow-mo, changing 50 fields t 25frames. In the NTSC world (shooting 60i) you can do a 40% slow-mo, changing 60 fields to 24 frames.

So at minimum, you have to change the speed of the clip on your timeline... either to 40% if you are going from 60i to 24p, or to 50% if you are going from 50i to 25p. (alternate methods from just changing speed settings are to, in Premiere for example, changing clip properties to re-interpret the footage with a different frame rate)

That MIGHT give you the right results, but depending on what NLE you are using you might (actually probably will) still be seeing separate fields rather than frames.

What you need to do is to be able to extract each of those 50 fields and turn each of them into its own frame. I believe After Effects will do that. To be honest I haven't had to do this in years so while I know the theory I don't know the exact practicalities and capabilities of AE or whatever you need to do that.

Keep in mind that while this, when done right, does work and gives you correction motion, but that you still lose a significant amount of resolution because you are only using half of the lines in each frame/field combo.

Also, know that it's best when you are shooting that if you know you are going to be slow-mo'ing a particular shot, you should shoot that scene with an appropriate shutter speed for however much you are planning to slow-mo it. For example, if you normally shoot 24p then your "normal" shutter speed is 1/48th. But if you shoot 60i, you're going to be extracting fields to frames later as if you were actually shooting 60fps, so you'd want a shutter speed of about 1/120th. If you left your shutter speed at "normal" you'd likely get too much motion blur in each frame (if you have much action) to give you a really good-looking slow-mo.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Charlie Berg
Re: C100 - Slow Motion workflow in Premiere
on Jun 8, 2014 at 2:06:04 pm

A great example of the Canon C100 slow motion cheat! I shot everything on 60i and then brought it into a 24P Premiere CS6 timeline. That's it! You don't have to do anything else. (the non-slow-mo stuff in the middle was shot on an HDV cam).







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Dave Fleming
Re: C100 - Slow Motion workflow in Premiere
on Mar 31, 2016 at 7:49:40 pm

So, this footage is not slowed down at all? Just shot 60i and deposited in a 24p timeline?


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Charlie Berg
Re: C100 - Slow Motion workflow in Premiere
on Mar 31, 2016 at 8:01:04 pm

It's 60i footage dropped into a 24P timeline and THEN reduced to 40% speed.


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Dave Fleming
Re: C100 - Slow Motion workflow in Premiere
on Mar 31, 2016 at 8:14:16 pm

OK thanks! Is it an issue that my C100 shooting 60i imports into Premiere Pro CC 2015 as 29.97i UFF? Do I need to interpret this footage to 59.94i frame rate before the other stuff?


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Benson Greene
Re: C100 - Slow Motion workflow in Premiere
on Apr 29, 2016 at 7:58:02 pm

I had this problem as well. I have done this before and was successful. However, I did shoot on a Ninja that time. When trying this time, I am also importing to find that Premiere is seeing 29.97.

So, I just took my original clip and imported into Adobe Media Encoder. I changed the frame rate to 59.94 and the field order to Progressive (no fields). I exported that and got pretty smooth footage.

I then imported into Premiere and the clip read 59.94 and played back pretty well. Then, I went rt-clicked on the clip and selected Modify / Interpret Footage and set it to "assume this frame rate" or whatever and set it to 24 fps.

I am pretty sure I used another method last time, but I am not sure. However, this method seemed to work quite well even though it included another step. The end product is pretty smooth.


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