FORUMS: list search recent posts

DVD Resolution

COW Forums : DVD Authoring

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Sue Black
DVD Resolution
on May 18, 2011 at 11:49:42 pm

I am trying to burn the best quality DVD I can. My video/asset which I put into my DVD Pro Software is DVCPRO HD 1080i60 made on the FCP compressor. I am using an IMAC to burn my DVD. I understand that I cannot burn a HD Video with the equipment I have (an IMAC) but can anyone give me some guidance on how I can burn a DVD with the best possible output given the high quality of my original video. On the Track in DVD Studio Pro the is a "resolution" of 720 x 480i can I increase the quality of that resolution and then the output quality of my DVD?
I am using the build & format setting. I would appreciate any support I can get.
Thanks.


Return to posts index

Steve Brame
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 19, 2011 at 1:54:45 am

DVD is 720 x 480 - period.

The primary way to achieve the best possible picture on a DVD is to encode the video to the highest bit rate possible for the amount of material that will fit on a disc.

Steve Brame
creative illusions Productions


Return to posts index

Sue Black
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 19, 2011 at 3:56:55 am

Thank you for your help. By saying to encode the video to the highest bit rate possible for the amount of material that will fit on a disc do you mean that the DVDPRO HD 1080i which I have it encoded in will be okay and will play alright? I was reading the threads and someone said to use compressor and compress to ProResHd which I found in my compressor settings but I wasn't sure what it was/is and if it will give me a better quality output that the 1080i which I already have. My video is just 15 minutes long. Thank you again, I really appreciate your help.


Return to posts index


Steve Brame
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 19, 2011 at 1:47:22 pm

Only MPEG2 can be used to encode video for the DVD. You will have to transcode your existing media to MPEG2. I do not use Compressor, so I can't guide you with it's specific operation, but it sounds like you need assistance with understanding the DVD specification itself first. The only format for the DVD spec is MPEG2, and the only resolution is 720x480. The bit rate is the speed at which the data on the DVD may be read by whatever machine is playing the DVD. The higher this rate, the higher the quality, but do NOT expect even the absolute highest quality on a DVD to even resemble the original HD footage. If you have this expectation, you will never be happy. DVD is not HD, it is SD.

There are a multitude of training videos on YouTube and others for creating DVD's with Compressor, as well as all other apps.

Steve Brame
creative illusions Productions


Return to posts index

Sue Black
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 19, 2011 at 3:11:03 pm

I'm starting to get a grasp of how it is done, thanks to your response and the threads, you can tell I'm a "learner". I've burned DVDs with the video input in DVDPRO HD 1080i for school projects which I had to hand them out, they look alright and function okay in "my" computer but I am thinking that probably no one else can see them in their equipment but they probably have not said anything to me about it. Thank you I will input in Mpeg 2 like you told me.


Return to posts index

Steve Brame
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 19, 2011 at 3:14:36 pm

Yep...if you burned a DVDPRO HD 1080i to a DVD disc, you were simply copying that file to the disc, and it would not play on a set top DVD player.

Steve Brame
creative illusions Productions


Return to posts index


eric pautsch
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 19, 2011 at 5:04:16 pm

For the record, there are half d1 resolutions which are supported as well.

704x480
352x480
352x240



Return to posts index

Steve Brame
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 19, 2011 at 6:03:20 pm

True, they are supported, but when the source is 1080i, and the OP wishes to maintain the highest resolution possible, these are not a factor and may only serve to confuse.

Steve Brame
creative illusions Productions


Return to posts index

eric pautsch
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 20, 2011 at 7:17:53 am

Actually whats confusing is when you indicated 720x480 is the ONLY resolution supported by the spec. Here's a good run down.

But yes....almost all discs are 720x480 or 720 x 576

NTSC (NTSC Film)

Video:
Up to 9.8 Mbps* (9800 kbps*) MPEG2 video
Up to 1.856 Mbps (1856 kbps) MPEG1 video
720 x 480 pixels MPEG2 (Called Full-D1)
704 x 480 pixels MPEG2
352 x 480 pixels MPEG2 (Called Half-D1, same as the CVD Standard)
352 x 240 pixels MPEG2
352 x 240 pixels MPEG1 (Same as the VCD Standard)
29,97 fps*
23,976 fps with 3:2 pulldown = 29,97 playback fps (NTSC Film, this is only supported by MPEG2 video)
16:9 Anamorphic (only supported by 720x480)


PAL

Video:
Up to 9.8 Mbps* (9800 kbps*) MPEG2 video
Up to 1.856 Mbps (1856 kbps) MPEG1 video
720 x 576 pixels MPEG2 (Called Full-D1)
704 x 576 pixels MPEG2
352 x 576 pixels MPEG2 (Called Half-D1, same as the CVD Standard)
352 x 288 pixels MPEG2
352 x 288 pixels MPEG1 (Same as the VCD Standard)
25 fps*
16:9 Anamorphic (only supported by 720x576)



Return to posts index


Steve Brame
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 20, 2011 at 1:44:12 pm

Sorry, didn't mean to confuse. I was speaking strictly to and in the context that the OP was presenting. When transcoding from 1080 to DVD with 15 minutes of footage, and the highest resolution possible is desired, the lower resolutions don't make sense. In fact, the lower resolutions are rarely, if ever, utilized in a final production scenario. They are used more with direct to disc recording devices and certain lower end camcorders.

Steve Brame
creative illusions Productions


Return to posts index

Michael Slowe
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 23, 2011 at 10:07:39 am

You fellows are really confusing poor old Sue now. You've gone right away from Steve's original very kind and helpful early advice.

Sue, to get your required MPEG 2 file for burning a DVD you need to use some good encoding software. I'm not sure that Compressor is as good as one called BitVice, if you can find someone who has it you should give it a go. In that you can choose the appropriate bit rate and there are sliders which indicate what the size of the file will be so you can see whether or not it will fit on the disc. I often make 15 minute DVD's and use a rate of about 7 because any higher than that may cause playback problems on some players. I'm getting very good DVD picture quality from my original 1920 X 1080i HD material. However, if you want 'HD' quality, why not produce Blu-Ray discs? The difference is amazing and all you need is a Blu-Ray burner and Titanium Toast version 10 or 11 and it's very straightforward to do. I don't know whether people are getting Blu-Ray players in your area. Here in London they are now widespread and together with an HD TV screen (these are now very common) your stuff will be shown to its best advantage.

Michael Slowe


Return to posts index

eric pautsch
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 23, 2011 at 6:52:55 pm

How do you know we are confusing her? She's learning so I believe giver her as much info as possible would be a positive?

Most folks dont know DVD support those half D1 resolutions.



Return to posts index


Sue Black
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 26, 2011 at 12:38:05 am

Thank you Slowe, Brame, Pautsch, for responding to my questions, to be honest I was confused way before I turned to this site for help. I have been using different compression settings to see what I get. I used HDV 1080i, DVDPROHD1080i, ProRes422, Mpeg2 as my input videos and I burned a DVD with each of them. DVDPROHD1080i, ProRes422 inputed into my DVD Studio Pro Software gives me a good quality DVD output. I am assuming from what all of you say that my "output" format is a SD Mpeg2? The input ProRes422 is 20G, the input DVDPROHD 1080i is about 17G. They both fit/burn on my DVD which is a DVD-R. My DVD says its hold 4.7G. My original video was filmed with a Sony HD Camera in 1080i which I put in my Final Cut Pro Academic Version Software to edit and produce a 14 minutes video. As part of my software I have DVDStudio Pro which is the only software I have to burn DVDs with. Compression is the software that comes with my FCP software. I have tested the DVDs on various computers i.e. Mac, Dell, Hewlett Packard at our local Best Buy Store. The problem I am having is that the video output on my DVD looks really good and sharp (almost like HD) BUT on certain frames it has these lines in it which looks something like the heat steaming up in those Western Movies you see. From what everyone has said I am thinking that the input video resolution is just too much for the DVD Mpeg2 SD output to handle.

QUESTION: Is that the problem?

I don't know there are no real settings on my DVD Studio Pro other than 3/4 Ratio 16/9 Ratio, first play, etc. my software says it can produce a HD DVD but my computer can not. I am on the latest version of IMAC.

I would love to be able to burn blueray but I am a graduate student and I just barely purchased my FCP software. I cannot afford the equipment needed to do so. Not to many people even have blueray players here as of yet.

Final point I played both my DVDs on Sony HD1080i TV's with a Sony DVD player at Best Buy Store. I have also studied the on-line tutorial on Lyndia and some of the other sites which have DVD tutorials for FCP but it seems that they are "basis" tutorials I have figured out pretty much what they are saying on my own. Does anyone know of more advanced DVD tutorials which I can study?
Thank you all again.


Return to posts index

Michael Slowe
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 26, 2011 at 9:34:36 am

Sue, we all get this problem when there are sharp edges and the camera moves. It's a characteristic of MPEG 2 I'm afraid and the sharper detail there is in the picture the worse it sometimes is. That is why I mentioned Blu-Ray because this almost entirely disappears when HD is encoded to a BD. However you do seem to be very much on the right track with all your research and experimentation. Don't drive yourself mad, accept the limitations of DVD's provided you can put up with the slight disadvantages, the key is in correct encoding.

Michael Slowe


Return to posts index

eric pautsch
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 26, 2011 at 1:22:11 pm

Your issue could have alot to do with the down conversions you are getting. (ie: the conversion from HD to SD). Many people use Compressor for this FIRST and some export directly out of a 1080i timeline to Encode. I use tools called AVIsynth and Virtual Dub with some custom scripts when doing down and cross conversion. There are many tools which do down conversion and some are better than others. Ive always heard compressor is good but I cant say for sure since Ive never used it for that.

Here are some basic steps:

1. MOST DVDs are 720x480 (NTSC) 576x480 (PAL). Basically you need to take whatever frame size you're shooting/editing with and convert it to this first. This is where Compressor comes in. Export out of Compressor an uncompressed or lossless 720x480 16x9 anamorphic QT. This is the down conversion step.

2. Now that you have a down converted 720x480 16x9 anamorphic QT, you need to find out what bitrate you need to use for your disc. this is where a bitbudget Calculator comes in.

http://www.videohelp.com/calc.htm

It will tell you what bitrate is best based on the RT of your piece. Forget the file size because it does not matter... Only runtime. Remember encoding parameters are explained in mb per SECOND (as in time). So if your piece is 10 secs long and your bitrtae is 6mb/s, then your final encoded MPEG 2 file will be 60 mb--- 6x10=60

3. Now you can Encode with the correct bitrate. Also be sure to use AC3 audio. It takes of less bandwidth than uncompressed audio (.192 vs 1.5 mb/sec- roughly)

4. Bring your MPEG 2 into DVDSP and your done


There should be a sticky on this forum since Ive seen this same question weekly for the past 8 years or so. DVD authoring and encoding is super simple once you know the correct steps and which tools do the best job for you.



Return to posts index


Sue Black
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 26, 2011 at 4:47:21 pm

Yes, I will definitely try your steps. Would I accomplish the same thing (get the video into SD 720 x480 16x9) for my DVD burning by compressing it to SD converted 720x480 16x9 anamorphic QT, in my Compressor to BEGIN with?
That way when I input the video into DVDStudio Pro to burn a DVD it will "aready" be in SD 720x480 16x9 anamorphic QT format and I will not be burning a DVDPROHD 1080i movie but the SD 720x480. I thought of that but someone told me that you have to input the "best" quality possible video to get the best DVD output. Thats why I have been so intent on compressing and putting my video into DVDStudio Pro in the format it was filmed on HD1080i 16x9.

I've tried some SD coversions and played them back on my computer but they weren't that great and I thought that inputting a "semi-good" version into DVDStudio Pro to burn would only give me an even worst output.


Return to posts index

Sue Black
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 26, 2011 at 4:30:00 pm

Thank you, your absolutely right my PRORES422 version has more heat like waves in it than my DVDPRO 1060I. Theres something I wanted to ask you since you are such an expert and tutorials don't talk about the type of DVD used for burning. I have been using Ritek Ridata White Inkjet Hub Printable 8X DVD-R because I am printing labels on my DVDs with an Epson printer. Is the speed (8X) the correct speed to use? I saw where they have other DVD speeds i.e. 16x. Also, is DVD-R the correct DVD or should I be using DVD+R? Someone at the store told me that DVD-R is the industry standard which can be played by most computers and DVD players is that correct?

I have learned a lot just by going back and reading your posts to other people on other topics, thank you.


Return to posts index

Michael Slowe
Re: DVD Resolution
on May 26, 2011 at 4:52:45 pm

Sue, the brand you use is important and personally I use Verbatim DVD -R discs but I don't know the brand you mention. I use the printable ones which have a nice matt white surface on which I print my covers as do you, on the Epsom Photo P50.

As to write speeds it is better I'm told to burn at a slow speed and I do mine at 2X but doubtless others may disagree. Eric referred to the downscaling and he is right, that is the crux of the matter. I always recommend the BitVice encoding software because it does the downscale and the Dolby ac3 audio file within its programme. The BitVice downscale is the best I've seen other than an expensive hardware downscale. I don't therefore need to use Compressor at all which I prefer because I don't like it for encoding DVD's - but that's just my preference. I just use Studio Pro to actually format the audio and video files once BitVice has prepared them and then I burn the disc in Toast.

Michael Slowe


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]