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staceL
DVD Studio Pro Tips
on Jan 31, 2007 at 9:00:07 pm

Can anyone out there smarter than I give me a tip on how to get the best quality out of DVD studio Pro? Anything I've made that's over 4.7gigs I've been burning the TS folder with Roxio Popcorn to fit to a 4.7 standard dvd. Compression Looks terrible! Especially on any wideshots with a crowd.

The reason I've used Popcorn recently is because I can't get my LaCie DL Burner to work properly with Studio Pro! After the build process when it starts to burn it gives me errors. Guys at LaCie told me to use Roxio Toast. Any tips will be greatly appreciated.

stace





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eric
Re: DVD Studio Pro Tips
by
on Jan 31, 2007 at 10:04:52 pm

We need more info. You say you used Popcorn. Did you try Toast? What are the errors you get from DVDSP?


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Don Greening
Re: DVD Studio Pro Tips
on Jan 31, 2007 at 10:13:47 pm

Are you using DVDSP to do your encoding or are you using Compressor? What versions of DVDSP and Compresssor are you using? If you've created an MPEG2 video file that's too large for a 4.7 DVD-5 disc and then use another program to downsize the file to make it fit, then it's going to be encoded twice. The resulting MPEG2 quality will take a big hit. Another important quetion is: Are you exporting your QT movie from Final Cut Pro using compression markers? If your internal DVD burner is working properly why are you using an external one to burn a 4.7 Gbyte DVD? Have you tried creating a disc image within DVDSP and then burned using Apple's Disc Utility?

As you can see, much more info is required in order to help you effectively.

- Don


"Please take a moment to fill out your profile, including your computer system and relevant software. Help us help you."


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staceL
Re: DVD Studio Pro Tips
on Feb 1, 2007 at 1:45:21 am


I've learned a lot since I laste posted so forgive me.

Sorry I didn't provide more detail. I'm new I'll get the hang of it. I'm using DVD Studio Pro 4. I have compressor 2.0.1. I've never really used compressor for encoding my dvd projects. I always thought I would loose my chapter markers. I export the video from Final Cut Pro with my chapter markers. I've never used the compression markers I really don't know what they do. The reason I'm burning to my external is because 1. my internal extreamly slow and 2. I want to create a DL dvd and my internal is not a duel layer burner. I was compressing my 5.6 gig project with Roxio Popcorn to fit to a 4.7 with pretty nasty looking results in my opinion. I've since since learned that popcorn will burn to a Duel Layer DVD. I was pretty happy to see that. When you say "disc Image" do you mean the TS folder?

In DSP's encoding preferences: What does the one pass and two pass vbr really mean? I'm guessing Two is better than One? Also what is the deal with the bit rate and max bit rate?

I hope this is enoght information. I really appreceate this help. I'm learning more everyday.



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Don Greening
Re: DVD Studio Pro Tips
on Feb 1, 2007 at 5:52:20 am

[staceL] "I was compressing my 5.6 gig project with Roxio Popcorn to fit to a 4.7 with pretty nasty looking results in my opinion."

That's because if you've already used DVDSP to encode to 5.6 gigs and then used Popcorn to reduce the size even further to fit on a 4.7 DVD. This means you've just encoded the same project twice. MPEG2 is a very lossy codec and compression should only be done once for best results. No wonder the final encode looks awful.

I would strongly suggest reading the DVDSP manual where it talks about how to do MPEG2 encoding. The Popcorn program you're using is a consumer type of encoder and will not come close to the quality encoding that Compressor will provide you with. Its $49.00 price tag speaks for itself. Also keep in mind that DVDSP 4 is quite capable of authoring dual layer DVDs.

As for creating a disc image, you might try reading the article below:

http://www.kenstone.net/fcp_homepage/image_to_disk_stone.html

Creating a disc image is a more reliable way of authoring when it comes time to burn a DVD. You can still use your external burner to do this.

[staceL] "What does the one pass and two pass vbr really mean?"

VBR stands for "variable bit rate". This is used for long form projects where the bit rate needs to be low so everything will fit on a DVD-5 but have a high enough bit rate in those areas of increased motion (read the manual). For example: a minimum bit rate of 4 for a 2 hour movie with a max bit rate of 6.5 to cover the fast motion areas. Enabling the VBR setting will allow the encoder to use the lower setting most of the time until it gets to areas of fast action where the high setting will be used, or somewhere in between the low and high settings. This is determined by the encoder itself. Make sence? (read the manual).

With 2 pass VBR the encoder will make the first pass to determine where the fast motion areas are and will pre-determine the bit rate settings for those areas. On the second pass it will do the actual encoding. This results in a better encode than 1 pass. If your project is a hour or less in duration you can usually get by with using the CBR setting, which stands for Constant Bit Rate. Set this for around 6 and you're good to go.

[staceL] "I've never used the compression markers I really don't know what they do."

Final Cut Pro creates invisible compression markers at every fade and transition in your timeline. These markers tell programs like Compressor to pay special attention to these areas when it comes time for encoding. To export both chapter and compression markers from FCP use the command "Export using DVD Studio Pro Markers".

Your burn errors may not be a problem with DVDSP but instead may be caused by compression errors when you use Popcorn to re-encode a file that has already been encoded. To save even more DVD space for video make sure you're also encoding your audio to the .ac3 file format (read the manual). AC3 audio takes up a fraction of the space that .aif audio occupies and there's no appreciable quality loss. This .ac3 file format is a DVD industry standard.

The path to better encoding already exists on your computer. All you have to do now is learn how to take full advantage of your Final Cut Studio programs. Did I mention about reading the manuals? :)

- Don





"Please take a moment to fill out your profile, including your computer system and relevant software. Help us help you."


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staceL
Re: DVD Studio Pro Tips
on Feb 1, 2007 at 2:13:48 pm

Don You are the man.. Thanks for this information. I'm a better man today! Thanks you so much!



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