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Remodeling Studio - Green Screen Purchase/Build Question

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Mike Dalton
Remodeling Studio - Green Screen Purchase/Build Question
on Feb 3, 2014 at 10:02:49 pm

I'd love a green screen cyc but I'm looking for something less permanent. My studio would be just TOO green with a permanent cyc. I have an old 12' wide wall-mounted motorized backdrop from Dennys that I've started using again. I think maybe having something rolled-up on this system may be the way to go (I like the idea of a a cyc I can store away). So, would vinyl, or a foam-backed cloth be the way to go? Or would some cheap linoleum painted green on the back be better? I'm worried about the paint on the linoleum cracking if it's rolled up and down. Or maybe painting the wall is really the way to go and forget about the roller? I do a lot of keys and want the cleanest key possible. I appreciate any advice you have!


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Todd Terry
Re: Remodeling Studio - Green Screen Purchase/Build Question
on Feb 3, 2014 at 10:09:41 pm
Last Edited By Todd Terry on Feb 3, 2014 at 10:12:03 pm

Since you already have the backdrop roller, why not just get a roll of chromakey green seamless background paper?

It's not my favorite key background, but would likely be the cheapest (about 75-80 bucks for the roll) and definitely the easiest (mount it in your roller system and go).

Or instead of paper... vinyl...
http://www.rakuten.com/prod/cowboystudio-107-inch-x-15-feet-photography-pho...

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Mike Dalton
Re: Remodeling Studio - Green Screen Purchase/Build Question
on Feb 3, 2014 at 10:13:02 pm

I'm not nearly as concerned about cost as I am about getting a really clean key. Paper is possible (I'm not opposed to it), but only if it works really well - better than anything else. I have no experience with it personally.


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Mark Suszko
Re: Remodeling Studio - Green Screen Purchase/Build Question
on Feb 3, 2014 at 10:44:27 pm

I'm a huge fan of painted linoleum/sheet vinyl flooring. If you use the right primer first, and don't try to roll it up too tightly, flaking paint should not be a big problem. It IS heavy, though, but with a spare can of extra touch-up paint around, will last thru years of whatever you throw at it.


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Mike Dalton
Re: Remodeling Studio - Green Screen Purchase/Build Question
on Feb 4, 2014 at 3:03:53 pm

The thing I like about the linoleum idea is that it is thicker than the vinyl sold for such purposes. I bought some white vinyl and it's about the thickness of a window shade - but with linoleum I'm thinking it would really be more like a painted wall. Perhaps I'm wrong but to me the thickness may make a difference in keying. I'm not sure.


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Mark Suszko
Re: Remodeling Studio - Green Screen Purchase/Build Question
on Feb 4, 2014 at 5:41:22 pm

Thickness doesn't make much difference as long as the material doesn't pass light thru or show sags or waves/wrinkles in the surface. The upside of using kitchen/bathroom sheet flooring is you can get it really cheap because you only care about the back side, the "felt", not the pattern or color on top, so you get end-cuts and clearance prices on the ugly stuff nobody bought, for pennies on the dollar. You can walk on it in street shoes and not damage it. Spike heels may hurt it, but I haven't had that scenario here yet.

The downside is that it does get heavy in larger pieces. But it is nearly indestructible.

When I use this for a white or green screen, I first prime it with kilz brand latex (not oil) based primer, after which the color coat goes on and grips very well. If you don't kink it or roll it too tightly for storage, the paint will not crack or flake off. I do save a quart or so of the original paint for touch-ups, but haven't needed it yet.

Our main application for this was to cover very large flats on the set with something seamless and super-wide, that takes paint well. Scuffing the color top surface to promote adhesion, we contact-glued the material to the wood flats, then painted the "bottom" surface. For a green screen, you just trap one end of a sheet between some 2x4 boards using screws, then use that as the attachment point for your light grid or stands or wall hooks, whatever. When hung, it hangs in a lovely seamless cove as it hits the floor and runs towards the camera.


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