FORUMS: list search recent posts

Need recommendation for video color charts

COW Forums : Cinematography

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Seth Marshall
Need recommendation for video color charts
on Oct 28, 2011 at 8:03:10 pm

I would like to up my game. Currently I don't shoot color charts with my location work and I don't see myself buying the more expensive DSC Labs charts (unless you convince me otherwise).

I understand white balance, but am unfamiliar with the post end of using color chips though I can see it's obvious usefulness. I've also never been trained in the engineering end of adjusting the matrix, white vs grey balancing...

I would very much like to learn more about this, if someone could point me in the right direction. Also, what charts should I be looking to purchase?

Would a mini DSC chart like this ( http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/465713-REG/DSC_Labs_PCE_PCE_Pocket_Ca... ) be better than others I've seen like this ( http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/817209-REG/DGK_Color_Tools_DKCPRO_DKC... http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/465286-REG/X_Rite_MSCCC_Original_Colo... or http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/651253-REG/X_Rite_MSCCPP_ColorChecker... )


Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Need recommendation for video color charts
on Oct 28, 2011 at 8:12:18 pm

Seth,

the only charts worth buying for camera setup that includes Matrix are the DCS Chroma du Mondes. If all you're doing is white balance, gamma and detail, then any old chip chart will do, but the calibrated colors on the CdM charts allow precise Matrix adjustment for the most accurate reproduction of color. I know of no other such tool.

JS



Return to posts index

Rick Wise
Re: Need recommendation for video color charts
on Oct 28, 2011 at 9:18:17 pm

My experience of sitting in on many, many transfers from film to tape of my footage is that the most useful chart of all is a correctly exposed gray card. If the card is shot correctly, the colorist can neutralize everything correctly. After that s/he rolls into the scene and starts tweaking contrast etc.

"Shot correctly" means placing the card in what you have determined to be "white" light. For instance, if you want the effect of late sunlight streaming in with its orange cast, you would NOT put the card in the sunlight. Instead you'd light it with an HMI or some other "daylight" unit. If by mistake you placed the card in the sunlight, the colorist would pull out all the warmth.

But talk to the colorists you work with, the people who will adjust the color, contrast, etc. of your footage. Ask them.

Rick Wise
Cinematographer
San Francisco Bay Area
http://www.RickWiseDP.com


Return to posts index


Seth Marshall
Re: Need recommendation for video color charts
on Oct 28, 2011 at 9:48:34 pm

This reply is very helpful for me, thanks! Are there tweaks you perform in camera when shooting the grey card? Do you have a preference/recommendation for grey card?

I believe this tool would be most useful for my situation but I'm always open to learn/offer more. For my location work I usually have a small lighting package and work with available fixtures including fluorescents (ex: a library). I want to be able to fix color issues in post the best I can.


Return to posts index

Seth Marshall
Re: Need recommendation for video color charts
on Oct 28, 2011 at 9:42:01 pm

Thanks for the reply. Do you know where I can learn more about the matrix? I've mentioned before how I want to move forward in my career.

For what I mostly do now there is definitely no time for that level of precision, I would probably at this time buy a cheaper chart if you feel it is adequate. Am I right to assume color chips wouldn't be as important as white, black and grey? .....again, do you have a recommendation for where I can learn more? :)

Thanks so much for your time!


Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Need recommendation for video color charts
on Oct 28, 2011 at 9:55:16 pm

Seth,

Matrix is a was to adjust the color in every hue and saturation. In order to make these adjustments, presumably to create an accurate color rendition of your subjects, you need a DSC CdM chart, a proper evenly lit environment, waveform/vectorscope and ideally a Remote Camera Control Unit (CCU).

If you don't have the4se things, you're better off not fiddling with the variable Matrix settings.

Fortunately with most modern "professional" cameras the manufacturers have included various "Preset Matrixs" and I'd encourage you to play with these in a controlled environment (meaning not on a job) to see the various effects they create and determine if and when each might be appropriate for your use.

Adjust your monitor with the pluge and blue only to a nominal setting and light a typical scene that you'd encounter, perhaps an interview and have at it. Try all the different presets and carefully observe. Take notes if you wish. Record the different presets and play them back. Note what it looks like with Matrix on and off. If there is a separate color saturation control try that too, but be careful in using it without a vectorscope as you can mistakenly create too much color which is "illegal" and could cause your footage to be rejected for broadcast.

As I said, the grey chip chart is only useful for adjusting the white balance (red and blue gains), gamma and perhaps detail (although a waveform monitor is best for detail so you can see the noise and artificial contour; otherwise it becomes very subjective and dependent on the size and quality of the monitor you are observing it on).

Good luck!

JS



Return to posts index


Rick Wise
Re: Need recommendation for video color charts
on Oct 28, 2011 at 10:30:29 pm

You might want to buy the text book I'm using for my digital Cine 1 students, Video Shooter, 2nd Edition, by Barry Braverman. Chapter 6, "Tweaking your story's image." is all about ways to adjust and control the look of your camera, including matrix, chroma, knee, master ped, gain, filters, etc.

You would play with these only when NOT on a paying gig.... until you learn what they can do. As always, a little goes a long way, less is more, etc.....

Rick Wise
Cinematographer
San Francisco Bay Area
http://www.RickWiseDP.com


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]