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Shutter timing?

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Chris law
Shutter timing?
on Feb 20, 2011 at 2:41:34 pm

I wanted to know what would shutter timing 90 and 45 degrees be equivalent to in shutter speed.

Thank you


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Todd Terry
Re: Shutter timing?
on Feb 20, 2011 at 4:22:05 pm

It depends on your frame rate (fps).

But, if you're talking about a frame rate of 24fps, then a 90° shutter is a shutter speed of 1/96th of a second. A 45° shutter yields an exposure of 1/192nd of a second.

For other frame rates or shutter degrees use this formula:
1 / 360 รท degrees x fps

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Chris law
Re: Shutter timing?
on Feb 21, 2011 at 12:37:33 pm

Thanks a lot, the frame rate im working at is 50fps so the shutter speed would be around 1/200?. Im going for that war film look so I need higher shutter speed.


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Todd Terry
Re: Shutter timing?
on Feb 21, 2011 at 3:19:07 pm

[Chris law] "Im going for that war film look"

Ah... the Saving Private Ryan look? Well at 50fps a 90° shutter would be 1/200th of a second. A 45° shutter at 50fps would be 1/400th.

I believe in some sections Ryan was shot with a shutter as narrow as 7.5° to give its very specific look. Of course that was shot at 24fps, I'm not sure how well it will translate in slow-mo at 50fps. With slow-mo footage you normally crank the shutter speed up anyway just to make it appear "normal," so to exaggerate the effect it might take quite a bit more.

Ryan is a great example of narrow-shutter effect used very very well. To see the opposite, watch Gladiator.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Chris law
Re: Shutter timing?
on Feb 23, 2011 at 2:20:48 pm

Intresting stuff. I found a 25p Option on my camcorder and I will try shooting with that with about 180 shutter speed. Although what If I shot in 50p at about 200 shutter and then just converted the 50p to 24p/25p Then if I wanted to slow down the footage for any reason I could have a smoother slow motion.

At 1:53 do you recon this was a really high shutter speed or was it some effect in post production





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Todd Terry
Re: Shutter timing?
on Feb 23, 2011 at 3:19:17 pm

[Chris law] "At 1:53 do you recon this was a really high shutter speed or was it some effect in post production"

That could have been done in-camera by shooting at a really slow frame rate but with a really narrow shutter... and then printing the film so that it doubled (or tripled) multiple frames... but, I bet not.

I think I can say with pretty high certainty that was a post-production effect... created by skipping certain frames and doubling up on other ones to make up the time.

It might not be the best way, but the easiest/fastest/cheapest way to do that in editing would be to put your clip on a timeline and speed it up, make a new clip of that, slow it down to so that the apparent speed matches the original, then make a new clip of that one. For example, you could put your source clip on a timeline, speed it up to 200%, make a new clip of that and throw it on the timeline, slow that one down to 50%, then make a new final clip which would become your new source clip. In that case, instead of the original frames 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8, etc, you would be seeing frames 1 1 3 3 5 5 7 7, etc.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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