FORUMS: list search recent posts

Lighting for B&W shoot

COW Forums : Cinematography

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Peter Humble
Lighting for B&W shoot
on Oct 13, 2008 at 12:10:58 pm

Hi,

I'm shooting a short in B&W in a couple of weeks.
If I'm shooting indoors with lots of natural light and I've balanced my cam (HD) to daylight is it still necessary to color correct my tungsten light as I would shooting in color?

Regards,
Peter


Return to posts index

Todd Terry
Re: Lighting for B&W shoot
on Oct 13, 2008 at 1:32:39 pm

The short answer.... no.

In fact, all that gelling your tungsten instruments for daylight is going to do is cut their output.

BUT...

If you think there is ANY chance that you will not use the footage as b/w but might need it in color (even if it is a slim chance), it would probably be wise to correctly color balance everything. If not, you will kick yourself later.

But if it is absolutely positively definitely a b/w project, don't bother.


T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com






Return to posts index

Peter Humble
Re: Lighting for B&W shoot
on Oct 13, 2008 at 7:58:24 pm

Thanks for that Todd.
Well the director seems pretty sure he wants B&W but now I'm clear about that I can raise it before hand.
Peter



Return to posts index


Mark Suszko
Re: Lighting for B&W shoot
on Oct 20, 2008 at 3:46:01 pm

Something I'd like to point out is that everyone on the job should be clear if you are trying to shoot Noir or Chiaroscuro, versus something more flat. There is actually more to shooting good B&W than just cranking down the chroma level on color footage.
There are matters of contrast to figure out.

I saw some behind the scenes production stills, in color, of some old Flash Gordon and Buck Rodgers movies as well as some Robin Hood type things, from the 30's and 40's and the colors in the stills look like they were picked by someone on acid with color blindness, pinks and oranges and purples etc. that clash horribly. WHY choose such psychedelic colors? Because of how they READ in B&W.

If you look at some color footage with your monitor's chroma turned off, you can see that two colors that look very different in full color, like a yellow and a green and a blue, can read exactly alike in shade and brightness value or contrast when you take the chroma away. I like to check my graphics on a B&W screen before final output for similar reasons; if it reads great in monochrome, it will pop even better in full color. If it is hard to distinguish in monochrome, the color version is going to "feel" weak and not pop as well as it might. If your monitor has a blue only button, this is a quick way to check. On a set, look thru some night blue or heavy gray gel.

This leads back to your upcoming shoot. You might, depending on the look you want to achieve, deliberately slant some colors in the sets, and especially the clothing, to better control the apparent contrast in monochrome. This might also mean say, washing a wall with a bizarre color choice, or picking a really "loud" tie, that improves the contrast in monochromatic view and "reads" properly.

Making that choice of course means it would be expensive to go back later and re-edit a color version, you'd have to do a lot of time and cost-causing color correction. But to my mind, you really need to take a stand in pre-prod, and commit to doing the B&W RIGHT or not doing it at all.



Return to posts index

Peter Humble
Re: Lighting for B&W shoot
on Oct 20, 2008 at 8:27:14 pm

Hi,
Great point Mark. Thanks for chiming in....it's extremely helpful to me



Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]