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16mm film question...

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John Jackson
16mm film question...
on Mar 23, 2008 at 7:37:01 am

I found some old 16mm footage and every so often during playback, there is an overlay of color orange/yellowish, sometimes it is transparent and at other times it fills the frame. These are outdoor shots. My question is, what is this called? The reason I ask is that I want to copy it in one of my films to make it look like an old home movie, but without the name of this "effect" I can't find a tutorial or plugin, etc. Thank you for your help in advance.


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Todd Terry
Re: 16mm film question...
on Mar 23, 2008 at 4:04:47 pm

My first questions would be: 1) how long does this effect last, 2) is it confined to the areas inside the frames or does it bleed across the frame lines and onto the film edges, and 3) when it happens is it only at the beginning and/or end of a take, or might it happen in the middle of a shot as well?

What you are seeing there is obviously film fogging... although without a little more info I can't tell exactly how the fogging happened or what it looked like. It could have occurred as the camera motor was ramping up or down at the start/end of takes, it could have occurred when changing lenses, or it could have happened when the film was out of the camera (being loaded, etc.).

I have done effects like these electronically in the past, but I have never run across a single plugin that would do this exactly. I have usually done it with a variety of filters, etc., usually tweaking brightness/contrast/hue/saturation and a few other things and changing them throughout time to create the proper look.


T2

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Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com






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Rennie Klymyk
Re: 16mm film question...
on Mar 26, 2008 at 7:33:51 am

Yes, it sure sounds like film fogging or grossly over exposed film from opening the iris to far. If you have a hi res digital camera with a macro lens you could tape the film strip to a light table (or even a window) so the gaffers tape masks off everything but the film strip, then take some photos of it making sure you only see the film strip and gaffers tape in the viewfinder and not any of the bright light table. Even a 1-1 ratio full macro lens will only give you an image as big as the 16mm frame itself so it will be a small area of the digital camera frame but if the camera captures 6MB files or so you could easily blow them up on your time line. Take some over exposed, properly exposed and under exposed (so bracket at 1/3 stop increments for variety) and you should get different intensities of the frames you photograph. These can be imported to your NLE and saved as overlay masks. You will likely need to play with the density of any images you lay them on in the time line if you want the effect over your images as with the original film, the image gets burnt out also when the fogging occurs and it exists only faintly on the film after overexposure (with positive stock).

"everything is broken" ......Bob Dylan


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