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David Kosloski
Studio Walls/ Designs
on May 19, 2015 at 7:53:41 pm

Hey all,

first time posting and super glad I found this forum. I just bought my first house and creating a studio in a small barn out back. It's roughly 316 square feet and is basically a big square. I wanted to not only do filming in it but put my PC in there for editing, possibly a couch, TV, mini fridge, desk, etc. Office meets studio. I know it's not a massive space but it's not big enough to shoot anything crazy and all the work I typically do is stand in front of the camera, testimonials, etc. If anyone thinks this is a bad idea, I'm open to suggestions.

The real question here is what color should I paint those walls and or if I should build some sort of cyc. I want to be able to film infinite white, but don't want to be limited by anything. Something tells me it might not matter what color to paint the walls as an option I had was getting some backdrop stands and moving them as needed. I have a massive wood backdrop that we drilled into the wall roughly 50 lbs that I'm seeing about hanging on a stand. Just want the place to be somewhat versatile and comfortable. I don't want to be limited to one strict thing.

Sorry for the lengthily post. any help/feedback is appreciated. :)


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Todd Terry
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on May 20, 2015 at 12:01:39 am

Fairly small space, so one issue would be to prevent as much reflected/bounced light as possible.

If it were me I'd paint all walls (and ceiling, if possible) matte black.

If that's just too cave-like for your taste, then as dark a gray as you can stand. And make sure it is an absolutely neutral gray, not skewing toward any actual color.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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David Kosloski
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on May 20, 2015 at 1:45:43 pm

Thank you sir! I will take your words into consideration. You think it's best to just get back drop supports with wheels and move things around for possible green screen work, infinite white, etc. ?

Thanks again!


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Mark Suszko
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on May 20, 2015 at 2:09:09 pm

My standard spiel for a DIY white wall or greenscreen is to hang vinyl sheet flooring, the kind used for kitchens and bathroom flooring, and paint that. Get the cheapest, ugliest leftover flooring they sell, s long as the back side is flat... You paint the reverse side, the side that normally gets glued down, first, with Kilz brand latex primer, then latex paint of your choice. Clamping the top end between some boards, you can then hang it and it makes a lovely caternary curve for infinity coves as it runs down and onto the floor. It is heavy, but cheap and very durable. And it can be rolled up and stored as well.

Since you mention a barn, it raises a tougher problem: audio isolation. Have you really sat in there for ten minutes, eyes closed, and LISTENED? What are you doing to insulate the recordings from external noises?


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David Kosloski
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on May 20, 2015 at 3:27:42 pm

Great idea! I'm making my own back drop frame as one of our back drops is 80 lbs. Using Manfrotto 033 Single Extension, Avenger Roller Stand 34 with Folding Base, and Manfrotto 035 Super Clamp. Do you think the vinyl idea is better than paper? Either way I'm open to what's the best and most professional.

Audio- So there was a bit of an echo, not horrible. It was insulated prior to my move in and there is OSB like board covering the insulation. Concrete floors as well. I'm putting in sheetrock next week and then going to paint it Matte/Flat black. I was hoping that the sheetrock might dampen the sound even more. Maybe some rugs on the ground and if really needed I will get some sound dampening foam and place it around the set, desk, etc.

What ya think?

THANKS!


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Todd Terry
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on May 20, 2015 at 3:37:46 pm

Two things about that to remember, neither hard surfaces nor parallel surfaces are not your friends... anything you can do about that to deaden the room will help. If you can stand in the center of the room and clap and not hear the reflection of the clap, that's a good goal (and easy test).

For the first year I had my company, I was a one-man operation and working out of my house. I was doing tons of VO recording, and my audio booth was literally just my living room... I'd string a long mic cable from my edit suite into the room and that's where we'd record voiceovers. It sounded surprisingly good. Great even.

I mentioned my surprise to my audio engineer when he was visiting and he said he wasn't surprised, noting that it was an old house so the walls were likely not perfectly parallel, I had hardwood floors largely covered by an area rug, and a fairly complex ceiling that was divided up into nine squares with very wide crown molding surrounding each square. He told me "You've accidently built an almost-perfect audio booth." Which was true... I'd say almost 20 years later that the audio in our "real" booth now doesn't sound any better than that did.

So... do whatever you can to incorporate as many soft surfaces as you can... rugs... drapes on windows (glass is super acoustically reflective, of course), items on walls, etc. If since you are sheetrocking there is any way to build out one edge of your new interior walls so that they aren't perfectly parallel, that will help tons. Even a tiny degree of difference can kill tons of reflections.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Mark Suszko
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on May 20, 2015 at 4:54:51 pm

Instead of foam, hang rugs or padded movers' blankets on top of the sheetrock that's off-camera. People often misunderstand what the foam units are for: they come in various designs and while you'd think they all absorb noise or reverb, not always so: some are designed just to reduce bass frequencies. The sheetrock is great because mass stops sound vibration. But where the sheetrock touches the floor, you should de-couple that joint with an elastomeric rubber layer so sound can't carry thru the structure via conduction.

Once you get the barn sound-tight, it's going to get hot and stale when buttoned up for long periods. Any ventilation system will need a "hush kit" to keep it from piping noise into the space or acting as a resonator.


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Todd Terry
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on May 20, 2015 at 5:00:11 pm

[Mark Suszko] " But where the sheetrock touches the floor, you should de-couple that joint with an elastomeric rubber layer"

Great point Mark makes there.

They actually make these metal strips that you can use to attach sheetrock (they go between the studs and the sheetrock) that acoustically-isolate the sheetrock. And Mark is right, the sheetrock should not actually rest on the floor (which is the way people would usually install it). At minimum chock it up with some shims before you screw it in, then pull the shims out.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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David Kosloski
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on May 20, 2015 at 5:26:58 pm

All really good pointers! There is a window in the barn where I was thinking about placing a window air conditioner and turn it on when not filming. I think that might be my only issue now. I'm going to compile these notes and come up with a game plan.


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Craig Alan
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on Jun 16, 2015 at 4:09:11 am

Mark. Our studio has noisy ventilation system even when all thermostats are turned off air blows through the system. What is a "hush kit"?

Mac Pro, macbook pro, Imacs (i7); Canon 5D Mark III/70D, Panasonic AG-HPX170/AG-HPX250P, Canon HV40, Sony Z7U/VX2000/PD170; FCP 6 certified; FCP X write professionally for a variety of media; teach video production in L.A.


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Mark Suszko
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on Jun 16, 2015 at 1:03:22 pm

A set of materials and techniques an HVAC technician employs to make the system quiet. Things like acoustic rubber sheets, coreless motors for the blowers, re-designed plenums, baffles to contain echoes, insulation, etc. It can become expensive, depending on how far you go with it.


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Craig Alan
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on Jun 16, 2015 at 2:23:42 pm

Will be keeping this in mind for new studio being built but was wondering if there isn't some cheap way to help with the noisy vents we live with now?

Mac Pro, macbook pro, Imacs (i7); Canon 5D Mark III/70D, Panasonic AG-HPX170/AG-HPX250P, Canon HV40, Sony Z7U/VX2000/PD170; FCP 6 certified; FCP X write professionally for a variety of media; teach video production in L.A.


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Todd Terry
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on Jun 16, 2015 at 2:31:43 pm

[Craig Alan] "wondering if there isn't some cheap way to help with the noisy vents we live with now?"

Well yes, if it is just the vents themselves that are noisy... just remove them (not the prettiest solution, but if it is vent-whistling etc that will stop it).

There is what was an old mill building here in town (I think they made shoes or something 100 years ago) that was converted into a theatre and performace space. They have the most amazing totally silent HVAC system... but as I understand it was right at a bazillion dollars. You can definitely spend a lot on sound mitigation, if you are inclined to.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Mark Suszko
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs
on Jun 16, 2015 at 5:23:57 pm

Even if you do nothing to them but seal the ends, these are huge, sheet-metal-clad resonating cavities, left untreated.

The least expensive option I can think of that still lets you use the things, is to route the existing ductwork to a chamber, outside the room, and then just treat that "mixing chamber" and the vents coming out of it. The ducts coming out of it need several 90-degree bends in them, and the insides need to be covered in something that deadens sound.


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Craig Alan
Re: Studio Walls/ Designs vent noise
on Jun 16, 2015 at 8:57:03 pm
Last Edited By Craig Alan on Jun 16, 2015 at 8:58:05 pm

Here's a particularly loud example of vent noise.


vent noise



Mac Pro, macbook pro, Imacs (i7); Canon 5D Mark III/70D, Panasonic AG-HPX170/AG-HPX250P, Canon HV40, Sony Z7U/VX2000/PD170; FCP 6 certified; FCP X write professionally for a variety of media; teach video production in L.A.


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