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how do i get the blue Tintout of the TV

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Detrich Totemeier
how do i get the blue Tintout of the TV
on Nov 25, 2013 at 5:51:26 pm

I'm from a small school in the middle of nowhere and we have a production class that's new this year and we just got a new TV for our back drop and we cant get the lights to the right angle so that there isn't any glare. Can You Help Me?


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Todd Terry
Re: how do i get the blue Tintout of the TV
on Nov 25, 2013 at 6:36:18 pm

Well first I'll note that your subject says one issue (blue tint) and your actual post says another (glare). I'm guessing the glare is the problem you are asking about.

This is largely simple physics... assuming it is a flat screen monitor it's going to act as a mirror and simply reflect the lights to the same degree that light is hitting it, in the opposite direction.

If you have the lighting where you want it and can't move the instruments to a point where you aren't getting glares, then you are going to have to deal with the monitor. One easy solution might be just to tip it forward a bit. You see that all the time on news sets, etc... what looks like a perfectly vertical monitor is actually leaning forward a bit. That might eliminate your reflections.

Another option would be to put some anti-reflective gel on the monitor, but that's going to fuzz the image a bit so I would only consider that if moving the orientation of the monitor doesn't work.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Jon Munford
Re: how do i get the blue Tintout of the TV
on Nov 26, 2013 at 5:08:26 pm

Hey Todd,

Thanks for your ideas on how to get the glare off of the TV. We are also having issue with bluing and over saturation when shooting the TV through our cameras. We can't seem to get the picture to be anywhere near viewable over the camera. Do you have any ideas on camera/tv setting to get it to work properly? I see tv's in the news all of the time so there has to be a way to do it.


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Todd Terry
Re: how do i get the blue Tintout of the TV
on Nov 26, 2013 at 5:41:25 pm

Hi John...

Those monitors that you see on news sets often don't look very good to the naked eyeball if you walk onto the set and view them... because they are set to look good only to the camera.

If your monitors look over-saturated, that should be an easy fix... just turn it down. While viewing the monitor on camera, use the TV controls to crank the saturation down (in the TV menu it will likely be called "Chroma" rather than saturation) until it looks good on camera... ignoring what it looks like to your eye.

The bluish tint may be a difficult fix, or it may be an easy one. Many (most) monitors have a color temperature more akin to daylight, around 5600°. Your studio lighting is probably tungsten, which is more in the 3200° neighborhood. Therefore your studio lighting is much warmer than the monitor (or you could say the monitor is much cooler than the studio). What you need is lighting and monitor that are the same color temperature. On many pro monitors and on some higher-end consumer monitors you can change the color temperature. It is by default probably displaying the more-or-less daylight color temp. Dig into the monitor's menu and see if you can change that. It might be a setting called "temperature" or just "temp" or maybe even just "picture." Try that. If you can't do that, then you'll have to work harder, because you're either going to have to change the color of your lighting, or change the color of the monitor in other ways.

One way of changing the lighting would be to use daylight instruments instead of your tungsten ones. In a studio setting that would probably mean flo or LED instruments. The easier/cheaper way would be to put blue gel on the lights, anywhere from 1/8 to 1/2 CTB, depending on how much correction is needed. One downside to that is that it will cut a fair bit of the light output. OR... you could change the temp of the monitor with gel. In that case you are trying to warm it up, so you'd put orange gel on the monitor, anywhere from 1/8 to 1/2 CTO. I've seen that done with some success... the last time I saw it in person the gel didn't look that good on the monitor (it wasn't applied very flat or smoothly) but on camera it looked pretty good.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: how do i get the blue Tintout of the TV
on Nov 30, 2013 at 5:49:52 pm

Todd has it right - the cheapest route is the gel route, not always great, especially if your gel has wrinkles in it. When I was Art Director at a broadcast station, anything I output for use on the studio monitors would have an added effect preset which warmed the content in the monitor. So if you have control over what's in your monitors, this could work quite well. If your monitor signals are going through a switcher, even the cheapest switchers often have built-in color correction. From what I've seen in the monitor settings, most monitors have the ability to change color temperature, but it was never quite enough to match the tungsten warmth in our studio lighting setup. But it would help a bit...

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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