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Lighting Interiors for Video

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Michael Asgian
Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 5:52:13 pm

I am a photographer that is just about to step into Video. I need some advice from you guys Video experts.

Most of the times when I'm shooting Interiors, I'm lighting them with flash. Sometimes when shooting for Real Estate customers they specifically request to pull out the view for certain shots because that's what they're selling. I do that with flash pretty easy...

I need to do the same for video, to balance inside light with outside so I can have the Views on video while showing the interior. For an average size room, let's say 20 x 30, on a sunny day, average size windows, what lighting options do I have without breaking the bank?

Thanks in advance

Michael


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Todd Terry
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 6:06:15 pm

What you are asking for is one of the things that cinematographers have to deal with all the time... well lit interiors where you can still see outside views at the same time.

Bascially it's a choice among various methods, and sometimes a combination of them. Firstly, there's simply using enough of the right lighting instruments to give you enough illumination indoors (usually that means HMI instruments), then there is darkening (and sometimes color-correcting) the windows with gel, screen, or both. And then there is the option to "fake it" in post by shooting exposures twice (one for interior, another for exterior), then compositing them in post.

This has been discussed very exhaustively here. I bet if you do a search in the lighting forum just using the keyword "windows" you'll find tons of posts with lots of helpful tips for combatting this problem.

It's not an easy one to fix (and usually not one for a novice cinematographer), but it certainly can be done.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Michael Asgian
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 6:13:25 pm

Thanks Todd for your answer... I'm sure it can be done with the right lights. I prefer to do it all in one, not doing in post because camera is moving on a jib or a slider.

I need some powerful lights I guess but I don't know what lights should I look into? CFLs? Metal Halide bulbs? LED arrays? etc. I know lighting for photography. Should be the same in principle, with details that I will discover soon for sure, but I need a starting point for the lighting gear.

Looked over at B&H and those cinema lights are sold for small fortunes. Any other ways? I'm not affraid of DIY either.


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Todd Terry
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 6:36:20 pm

Barring doing any post voodoo or taking time to screen and/or gel windows (which can be time consuming)...

...if you ONLY want to do it with lighting instruments...

Then HMIs are the only real choice.

On a sunny day outside, nothing else is going to have anywhere near the output that you need. You are talking a fair bit of money though... definitely four figures per instrument.

They are also available for daily rental (usually anywhere from 200-400/day), if you have a vendor wherever you are.

Also keep in mind that you don't want the interior as hot as the exterior. You don't want windows totally blown out, but you don't want the the same as inside either or it will look completely fake. Windows should be a stop or two hotter than the rest of the scene.

There are some new flavors of LED instruments (such as those from Aadyntech) that rival the output of smaller HMI heads, and also have the advantage of cool temps and very low power draws... but they are fairly pricey mid-to-high four-figure instruments as well... and not many rental places have them in inventory yet.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Michael Asgian
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 6:50:30 pm

The CFLs avenue is out of question then?

I have 2 bulbs each 150W, 5500K. I used them for some product shots. They are pretty bright...
I was wondering if having a few of those (like 10 or more) instead of HMIs could be an alternative?


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Todd Terry
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 7:08:22 pm

It would take about 40 150w CFLs (and I'm talking the really big actual watt flo tubes, not the "equivalent to 150w tungsten" tubes) to give you roughly the same output as a single 1200w HMI (remember that HMIs have about 5x the output per watt compared to tungsten).

And even one 1200w HMI wouldn't have enough punch to battle the sun if you have a lot of windows or a big 10x30 room like you are talking about.

Turn on one of your CFLs in a room like that on a bright sunny day as a test. If you're not looking at the lamp, you won't even be able to tell that it's on.

Sorry but that's just not the right tool for the job. It's trying to overhaul a V8 engine with a pair of tweezers.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Michael Asgian
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 8:11:44 pm

You are right! Unfortunately :)

Done some measuring with my lightmeter, It would take about 20-25 of those CFLs...
hard to manage on location... not to practical. I have to get in and out as fast as I can...

Back to HMI...

I saw these to our Chinese brothers...

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/wholesale-1000W-HMI-Fresnel-Light-Photograph...

Are they worth considering? What's the catch?


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Todd Terry
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 27, 2013 at 5:01:19 am

Jumping back up, Michael, I just looked at the link to that Chinese instrument.

Very fishy, I believe they are mis-labeling something, whether intentionally or unintentionally.

Firstly, you're never going to buy a decent sized HMI for $275, Chinese or otherwise. The Chinese-made HMI knockoffs generally start at about a grand, or $1200 or so.

Secondly, a "1000w HMI" would be VERY uncommon, if it even exists. I've certainly never heard of one that was 1000 watts. The nearest common sizes would be 575w and 1200w. There is no 1000w HMI that I know of. Well, there may be 1000w HMI globes for other uses, but they certainly not the norm in the photographic world.

Thirdly and lastly... that's NOT a picture of an HMI on the listing. That's one of those knock-off blue head Arri clones, which are TUNGSTEN instruments, not HMIs. That instrument clearly shows a regular household power cord coming out of the back and terminating in a regular plug-it-in-the-wall Edison plug. A real HMI has a much larger header cable coming out of it with a big twist-on connector, and that cable attaches to a ballast which powers the thing (that'll be an electronic box about the size of a smallish dog). That's not what this instrument is. It might be a realatively-decent tungsten instrument for the money (or it might be a piece of junk), but it's not an HMI. It would have less than a fifth of the light output of a 1200w HMI.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Bill Davis
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 1, 2013 at 8:53:31 pm

Look, I've done quite a bit of lecture and consulting work with the two largest professional photography groups in my town over the past few years (most of them are trying to do what you're trying to do - add video to their services since the same cameras can do both)

Here's the issue.

You've had a tool for your entire career that has NO equivalent on the video side.

A photographic flash can generate INSANE amounts of light for a fraction of a second. Synced to the lens speed, that will POP any subject. So that's what photographers do. They use light to highlight and focus the vewer's eye and attention.

Video is an entirely different beast. We don't need light for fractions of a second, we need it for MINUTES if not HOURS.

To get the same amount of light tossed on a scene that one of my Canon Flashes (580 and 430 EX's) let alone a Studio Strobe generates - I'd need a BIG HMI and an electrical panel patch or generator rig to power it.

A couple of important skills translate from still shooting to video. Composition. Appreciation of light. People skills. All that gives you a leg up. But there are other areas where the first time video shooter coming from photography is honestly no better situated to do good video (sound, motivated camera movement, scene blocking, etc. etc.) than anyone else.

I have massive respect for quality still shooters who've honed their craft over decades. You need the same for video. It's not so much that it's more difficult than still work - it's just that it's typically more complex and requires many more compromises to efficiently create moving pictures compared to still shots.

It's best to come toward video with the same attitude of respect and "starting from scratch" that you'd apply to me if, as a long time video shooter, I showed up at your photo shoot and thought I could do your job. I just can't. Not without lots of additional training and practice.

After 5+ years of pretty dedicated study and practice, I'm ready to call myself a mediocre working photographer - NOT a superior craftsman. And that's bringing to the table 20 years of producing, directing and shooting video at a solid commercial level.)

Video is HARD to do well. So is still photography.

In reality, you're kinda spoiled by strobes. Video doesn't work that way. And you need to adjust to a new reality where lighting and composition are important, but not, perhaps, as much as, say, audio and performance.

Start studying video. You'll be decent at it in about 5-7 years - and if you're really lucky - great in 10-15. Just like any other craftsperson.

Welcome to the club!

FWIW.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Rick Wise
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 1, 2013 at 9:05:45 pm

Very nicely put, Bill!

Rick Wise
Cinematographer
San Francisco Bay Area
http://www.RickWiseDP.com


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Michael Asgian
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 1, 2013 at 11:06:18 pm

Thanks Bill! Really appreciated!


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Mark Suszko
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 8:24:59 pm

Listen to Todd, he is right.

HMI or "Heavy Monetary Investment" lights (grin) are the only tool for this. The JokerBug family of products is a popular choice and often used by TV news crews shooting in the same conditions you face.

You other choice is to replace your jib/slider with a motion-control rig that can do the same move with precision, then you just do each move twice with two exposures and do a blending mode comp in the editing timeline. Huge rolls of gel are available and they are re-usable, you'd have to apply them from the outside and hid the fact they are on the doorways and windows, but you'd regain the freedom to shoot the way you like. You'd have to factor in the extra set up time invested in gelling the outside views. This can be streamlined by stapling gels to wooden frames of standard dimensions for windows and doors. But then you'll need a bigger vehicle to haul all the grip gear.


TANSTAAFL


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Michael Asgian
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 8:33:02 pm

Hey Mark, yeah. Got to the conclusion that Todd is right. However I'm open to find cheaper ways...

From what I understand reading and educating myself on this topic, "HMI" is a trademark... the bulbs are in fact Metal Halide. I'm looking up right now a few chinese knockoffs of Arris and the prices are about 8x lower than the originals.

How bad can be those?


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Mark Suszko
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 9:09:02 pm

You were only a wiki away from the real definition:

Hydrargyrum medium-arc iodide, or HMI, is a Osram brand metal-halide gas discharge medium arc-length lamp manufactured for the film and entertainment industry. Hydrargyrum is Latin for mercury (Hg).
An HMI lamp uses mercury vapour mixed with metal halides in a quartz-glass envelope, with two tungsten electrodes of medium arc separation. Unlike traditional lighting units using incandescent light bulbs, HMIs need electrical ballasts, which are separated from the head via a header cable, to limit current and supply the proper voltage. The lamp operates by creating an electrical arc between two electrodes within the bulb that excites the pressurized mercury vapour and metal halides, and provides very high light output with greater efficacy than incandescent lighting units. The efficiency advantage is near fourfold, with approximately 85–108 lumens per watt of electricity. Unlike tungsten-halogen lamps where the halide gas is used to regenerate the filament and keep the evaporated tungsten from darkening, the mercury vapour and the metal halides in HMI lamps are what emit the light. The high CRI and color temperature are due to the specific lamp chemistries.


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Todd Terry
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 8:57:05 pm

[Mark Suszko] "HMI or "Heavy Monetary Investment" lights..."


Hahaha... I've never heard it expressed like that, Mark. I will, however, freely steal that without your permission.

I too love Joker-Bugs. Unfortunately the 800w Joker is what, about six grand now? That makes them a bit more expensive (per watt) than other flavors of HMIs, but they make up for it in light weight and portability. In an environment like this though, I think it'd probably take a couple or three or more 800s. If I were shooting it myself with HMIs, I'd probably use a couple of 1200w heads, and maybe some smaller daylight instruments as well. As much as I love the 800 Jokers, I think they might be underpowered here.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Mark Suszko
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 26, 2013 at 9:17:55 pm

Seven grand, stripped down. 5600k is not a color temp, it's a starting price now:-) This is a great product to build a rental biz around, methinks, because the high buy-in is a natural barrier to competition as well as driving a need to rent.

Anyway, on the pittance typically paid to real estate shooters in the high-volume market, I think he's going to have to lock down the cam and go the HDRI/ 2-pass exposure route, or start making with the gel, tape, and scissors.

Though I suppose if he shot with flash and shot enough stills, he could afford to make the shot a QTVR or a simulated camera move done in post using his flash-lit stills.

Or only shoot before 8AM or after 5.:-)

You always have to trade one problem for another, tying to solve a situation like this.


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Jason Jenkins
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 27, 2013 at 9:42:34 pm

Coollights has 1200W HMI's for $3,699 (sans bulb). Chinese made, but decent quality. http://www.coollights.biz/clmp1200-cool-lights-1200w-p-78.html

Jason Jenkins
Flowmotion Media
Video production... with style!

Check out my Mormon.org profile.


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Todd Terry
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 27, 2013 at 9:45:25 pm

Yep, I have one of the CoolLights 1200w's and have used it for several years. Mine is a fresnel, though... I think they only sell a PAR version now. Got mine when Richard was just starting to sell them, I don't think they offered the fresnels in that size for very long. Shame, I greatly prefer fresnels to PARs (although I think I'm the only one).

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Rick Wise
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 27, 2013 at 10:14:12 pm

Todd, you are far from the only person preferring Fresnels to Pars. Or maybe it's just you and I.... But it seems to me that much depends on how you are using these lights. Direct and hard, Fresnels. Bounced or through diffusion, the Pars may be more useful as they have more punch/intensity. If you can afford only one, I'd go with the Fresnel since you can use it both directly as a hard light, and also as a soft light through a Chimera/bounce/other diffusion. One lonely 1200 is of course just a start.... So much money, so little time.

Rick Wise
Cinematographer
San Francisco Bay Area
http://www.RickWiseDP.com


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Todd Terry
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 27, 2013 at 10:25:20 pm

I thought I was the only one, Rick.

I never understood the love affair with PARs if you could use a fresnel instead. If I never have to fumble around and swap out a hot lens again (only usually to decide my first choice is not the one I really needed), it will be far too soon. But I will probably have to before the week is out.

Just turning a focus knob is sooooo much more pleasant.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Jason Jenkins
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 27, 2013 at 10:48:10 pm

I've got the 575W Cool Lights fresnel. It uses the same ballast as the 1200W. I wonder if it would work with a 1200W bulb? That would be too simple...

Jason Jenkins
Flowmotion Media
Video production... with style!

Check out my Mormon.org profile.


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Todd Terry
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 27, 2013 at 10:59:37 pm

Yes it's a dual ballast, Jason (as lots of them are), but making the swap is not QUITE that simple...

The 1200w globe would require a different socket than in is the 575w. Also, you'd need a different head cable and/or connection at the head (while the cables look the same, 7 pins) they are actually a little different. A lot of dual ballasts (not the CoolLights one) actually have two differnt output ports on them, one for the 575w and one for the 1200w. While they seem almost identical if you look closely you'll see that the little "key" notch at the top of the coupling is in just an ever-so-slightly different position with the two. That's to keep you from accidently connecting a 1200w head cable to the 575w port, and vice versa.

I'm not sure if the actual ignitors in the head are the same for 575w and 1200w... they could be, I just don't know.

Then there is the issue of the housing size, which might not be big enough for adequate cooling of a 1200w globe, and since the 1200w globe is a lot bigger than a 575w (a LOT bigger), it likely would not be in the proper position in front of the reflector (I'd think it would be quite a bit too high)... especially since a 1200w socket is mucho bigger/beefier/taller than a 575w socket.

It would probably be much easier to figure out how to put a 575w globe in a 1200w head... but there's usually not too much point in that.

Sadly, many things that seem like they would be easy are not.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Jason Jenkins
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Feb 27, 2013 at 11:15:24 pm

Thanks for the info, Todd. I don't think I'll be messing with it!

Jason Jenkins
Flowmotion Media
Video production... with style!

Check out my Mormon.org profile.


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Bob Cole
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 1, 2013 at 3:31:58 am

I'm guessing the OP has tuned out on all of these expensive options. Real estate videos probably don't have the budget even for a one-day rental of an HMI.

I'd suggest EDITING.

If you want to show the view from the windows, shoot the view, properly exposed for the exterior. Then for the rest of the shots, just close the curtains if possible, or choose an angle in which the outside looks as dark as possible (wait for dusk?), and expose for the interior. The windows may be blown out - so what? The customers are going to be focused on the interior anyway. Look at it as a benefit: you won't have to worry about what the neighborhood looks like.

Or look up Todd's inexpensive window ND trick, and use a roll of that material to gel the windows. But again, I doubt that there would be time enough in a real estate video budget for that.

Good luck! Don't sweat the blown-out windows!

Bob C


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Michael Asgian
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 1, 2013 at 7:42:13 am

Yeah, It's not me that I'm sweating... but my customers. Having good views from inside is a must. I'll probably spend time in editing too, which is no news to me.

I plan to shoot with the BlackMagic Camera so that will give me a little leverage in pulling the views better. Probably I'll get two 1200W chinese ones for about $2.5k both, which is a pretty sweet deal I guess, and then, when all this starts to be positive as a ca$hflow, will get more...

Thanks everybody for the guidance!


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Michael Asgian
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 2, 2013 at 3:11:13 pm

Got now a little question about usability of the HMIs...

From what I read about them you need to ignite the light, wait a few minutes until it gets into working mode, do your takes, shut it down, wait a few minutes to cool down, while not moving the light.

I want to insist a bit on the "not move the light while operating...

That means the light cant be moved a bit to change angles, height, stuff like that? It has to stay completely still? That could be a bit problematic for my usage...


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john sharaf
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 2, 2013 at 3:34:14 pm

Michael,

You can move the light while it's burning; it's just that there is often a tangle with the head feeder, ballast and extension cord, such that you have to consider, like a chess move, where your next placement will be.

Some lights more than others have "hot restrike" issues such that if you do turn them off, move and try to reignite, they might not strike until they cool off a little.

Considerations of how long the unit was on, ambient temperatures and the "personality" of the particular brand and/or model of the HMI light come into play.

JS



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Bob Cole
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 2, 2013 at 5:27:47 pm

If the expense and hassle of HMI is going to make this impossible, why not combine video and stills?

I have a friend who shoots for high-end architectural magazines. His lighting is absolutely incredible; he makes the room look as if there is no artificial light at all, using window light and very judicious flash. As Bill Davis said, what you can do as a stills photographer for a fraction of a second is very difficult to achieve with the continuous lighting which video requires.

Suggestion: Shoot video where it's easy and makes a difference (dolly shots would be great), but use your electronic flash to shoot wide-angle, high-resolution stills for the rooms which demand flash, then take the results into After Effects and do your pan/tilts there.


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Bill Davis
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 4, 2013 at 12:59:52 am

[Bob Cole] "Suggestion: Shoot video where it's easy and makes a difference (dolly shots would be great), but use your electronic flash to shoot wide-angle, high-resolution stills for the rooms which demand flash, then take the results into After Effects and do your pan/tilts there.
"


One of the most interesting things during my study of still photography over the past few years was getting a chance to learn from a few still guys who do high level architectural photos.

What I saw them do was this...

They carefully framed and "locked down" for the shot of, say, a home exterior and shot a plate with remote strobes inside exposed to illuminate the interior space views from the exterior. Then they exposed the same shot for the exterior setting and ignored the window exposures - they already HAD that from the first shot. Compositing those would give them a "nice" exterior environment shot - WITH a properly exposed interior views - which would be pretty OK but not particularly spectacular - THEN they had an assistant literally walk around the exterior of the home - and said assistant would fire a strobe at details of the exterior landscaping - lighting up a bush here - a tree there - the brickwork over there.

Many of those "detail photos" had the assistant with the remote strobe totally visible in the shot. Then the real magic happens when whole sequence of shots goes back into Photoshop where they could composite the perfectly lit shrub area from shot 15 onto the base plate, subbing the EXCELLENT shrub for the OK one on the base. And so forth.

Working that way they could build a single PERFECT photo frame out of 20 less than perfect shots.

I came out of those situations SO jealous of the ability to composite-create images that looked perfect in a frame. And knowing why my video shots would NEVER look like an excellent still.

A still and a video are two TOTALLY different realities. To the audience, they're both forms of pictures. But they just DO NOT work by the same rules at all!

And the HUGE problem arises when the commissioning party thinks that having their still shooter do their video will result in video that looks a whole lot more like their BROCHURE shots.

Yeah, right.

FWIW.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Michael Asgian
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 4, 2013 at 1:29:28 am

Yes Bob, that's pretty much what I do. I am an architectural photographer...

I wish I could do the same for video. Unfortunately not possible under normal circumstances... hmmm, while writing this reply I just got an idea...

Take a look at this last shot I did last week. Client was the Architecture Company that did a restoration of an Historic building on Coronado island

http://www.michaelasgian.com/temp/adella/


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Bob Cole
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 4, 2013 at 1:57:43 am

Very nice work! When I see a gifted photographer, it makes me a little jealous, not just of your eye, but of the photographer's ability to manipulate light. There are a number of shots there which you could probably shoot with a video camera and minimal lighting - but there are several which would be a bear to shoot as well on video.

Even more than before, I recommend that you avoid buying tons of video lighting (and other) gear, and adopt a hybrid approach: shoot video when you can use existing light, and shoot stills for everything else.

Stills photographers can do so much with time exposure, multiple exposures (essentially what Bill D described), that video folks have to bend themselves into pretzels to emulate - and why bother?

In your situation, since you're an ace photographer, I'd still recommend that you leverage your still photography skills and the flexibility of still photography to the hilt. Buy a slider, and shoot some video that is obviously a "moving picture" because you're moving past a tree or down a hallway; and then cut to a still that you've animated with After Effects (or even inside your NLE) to create a zoom, tilt, or pan - or all three.

NO, it won't be exactly the same; it will feel a little "flat" compared to an authentic video move. But I'd rather see the beautiful still, than the crappily-lit video clip.

btw - there's more to good video camera work than the continuous lighting - it takes awhile (and an expensive tripod head) to learn how to make smooth, well-considered camera moves. Whereas, if you shoot a beautiful still, you can animate it all sorts of ways in post.

About buying "budget" HMI equipment: I don't know about the pluses and minuses of budget HMI gear, but I suspect that the reliable brands of HMI are expensive for good reasons. Sorta the difference, in still cameras, between Hasselblad and ... Instamatic?


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Jason Jenkins
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 4, 2013 at 6:05:58 pm

[Bob Cole] "In your situation, since you're an ace photographer, I'd still recommend that you leverage your still photography skills and the flexibility of still photography to the hilt. Buy a slider, and shoot some video that is obviously a "moving picture" because you're moving past a tree or down a hallway; and then cut to a still that you've animated with After Effects (or even inside your NLE) to create a zoom, tilt, or pan - or all three."

To take it to the next level, you can use the Vanishing Point in Photoshop on select photos; create 3D geometry and import the VPE into After Effects and do some sweet virtual camera moves. Once you get the hang of it, it's not hard to do and can produce stunning results.

Jason Jenkins
Flowmotion Media
Video production... with style!

Check out my Mormon.org profile.


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Bill Davis
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 4, 2013 at 8:35:26 pm

My only suggestion is that when your still clients come to you because you're also offering them video - you're in for a significant uphill battle to educate them that what you can do on ONE image for their brochure is wildly impractical to do on 30 frames a second of ever changing motion content.

One thing important in business these days is not to over promise and under deliver. And for still shooters moving into video work - that's going to be a HUGE problem.

Having made somewhat a transition in the other direction, (I'm shooting a LOT more stills these days!) it all to easy to fool yourself into thinking that because you can do great work in one imaging area that it means you can also do equal work in another.

Remember how well that worked out for Michael Jordan when he moved from basketball to baseball?

Same thing.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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John Fishback
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 8, 2013 at 4:23:33 am

Davinci Resolve comes with the Blackmagic camera. Shooting RAW you'll have 13 stops of latitude. Using Resolve you can automstically track as many objects in the frame as you like and have unique grades for each. This involves post production time, but gives you tremendous creative freedom.

John

MacPro 8-core 2.8GHz, 16 GB RAM, OS 10.7.4, QT10.1, Kona 3, Dual Cinema 23, ATI Radeon HD 5870, 24" TV-Logic Monitor, ATTO ExpressSAS R380 RAID Adapter, PDE enclosure with 8-drive 6TB RAID 5
FCS 3 (FCP 7.0.3, Motion 4.0.3, Comp 3.5.3, DVDSP 4.2.2, Color 1.5.3)
FCP-X 10.0.7, Motion 5.0.6, Compressor 4.0.6

Pro Tools HD 10 w SYNC IO & 192 Digital I/O, Yamaha DM1000, Millennia Media HV-3C, Neumann U87, Schoeps Mk41 mics, Genelec DSP Monitors, Prima CDQ120 ISDN


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Bill Davis
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 8, 2013 at 4:30:44 pm

This is a fabulous capability for sure. I just worry about the hassle of perfecting 13 moving mattes to "re- light" in post. Reminds me of 3D modeling. Everyone loves it. But nobody outside Blockbuster Hollywood wants to PAY for the time it takes to do it well!

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Todd Terry
Re: Lighting Interiors for Video
on Mar 8, 2013 at 4:50:12 pm

Is BlackMagic selling the darn things yet? I haven't checked in a while to see if their long-promised but much-delayed deliveries have even started.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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