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Re: How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?

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Johnny Robinson
Re: How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?
on May 15, 2012 at 5:24:19 pm

I think it would be really cool to find a black sheer fabric to use. Problem is I have visited every fabric store and drapery store and none of them are near dark enough.
I am really interested in a quiet non reflective alternative. (Cheap is nice also)
Window screens sound nice but how many stops of light can you kill with it?
Anyone who can give specific product names please do.

Johnny Robinson
Johnny@johnnyrobinson.com


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Scott Sheriff
Re: How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?
on May 16, 2012 at 6:38:40 pm

[Johnny Robinson] "How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?
by Johnny Robinson on May 15, 2012 at 11:24:19 am"


This is a very common problem, that has been covered pretty well here. A lot depends on the direction of the BG. North isn't too bad to deal with and South is usually the hardest.
Typical solutions are:
ND on the widows.
Screen the windows.
Overpower the BG with big daylight balanced lights
Shoot during twilight.
Combination of the above.

To add to all of that, most cameras have a pretty conservative curve in the factory default profile. Depending on what camera your shooting with, and what software you posting with, you can usually get one extra stop of headroom by shooting with 110% 'super white'.
If your talent is a typical behind the desk talking head and doesn't move a lot, or require any camera moves it is quite possible to shoot the BG separately at the proper exposure and matte this behind a properly exposed talent shot. Even if you don't plan on doing this, you should roll off some of this anyway when doing these type of shots as a safety backup. Just grab a minute of it when your getting your room tone.

[Johnny Robinson] "Window screens sound nice but how many stops of light can you kill with it?"

Window screen is typically one stop. A light meter is your friend here. Pretty easy to check whatever materiel under consideration before buying. Don't own a light meter? Shame on you...
FYI, layering screen to get another stop is problematic and usually causes Moire'.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com


"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." ---Red Adair

Where were you on 6/21?


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Mark Suszko
Re: How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?
on May 17, 2012 at 3:10:56 pm

Window screen works like ND filtration but does nothing to alter the color temperature, so you're still fighting blue daylight in a practically-speaking tungsten or flo-lit room. LED lights can match daylight but often lack the punch of halogens, so then you're still forcing yourself into a corner of needing an HMI, with the expense and power draw that comes along with that.

We long ago invested in very wide rolls of Roscosun that combines ND with daylight color correction and thus we gel the window in your situation. If you are very careful taking it down and re-rolling it to prevent creases, you can re-use the gel many times, until you trim it too short to fit the next window. If that happens or you have to be more brutal to it, you bill it to the job and buy some more.

Gelling windows can sometimes be hard. You can use static cling, windex, a squeegee and some clear scotch tape, single edge razor blades, and that will work 90 percent of the time. Other times, you may have to staple the gel to a lightweight frame sized to the window. We've applied gel to windows from both inside and out, depending on needs and locations. You have to build in the extra time to set up and tear down into your schedule.

If only there was a special, fast-drying, water-based, brush-on color correction filtration system for glass that could coat glass easily and evenly, yet peel off as easy as gel when done. It would make millions.




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Scott Sheriff
Re: How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?
on May 17, 2012 at 4:04:51 pm

[Mark Suszko] "
Gelling windows can sometimes be hard."


LOL, understatement of the week! The degree of difficulty is directly proportional to the desire to save the CTO for another job, squared.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com


"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." ---Red Adair

Where were you on 6/21?


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Johnny Robinson
Re: How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?
on May 17, 2012 at 4:17:06 pm

I am often forced to gel on the outside. I am still convenced the answer is a sheer fabric.

Here's my tip. I have a open frame with ND stretched on it. It happens to be about 16:9 so I hang it on a C-Stand and line it up so its just outside the frameline, between the talent & window. Also works for people coming in doors. Doesn't apply every shot, but it's great when it does.

Johnny Robinson
Johnny@johnnyrobinson.com


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Mark Suszko
Re: How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?
on May 17, 2012 at 5:01:34 pm

That is a cute idea, though as you say, only for some limited situations. How do you store it in-between uses? I imagine you break off two opposing parts of the frame and roll it all up in a long bundle?


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Johnny Robinson
Re: How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?
on May 17, 2012 at 5:26:13 pm

I just put self adhesive velcro felt on the ND. We roll it up with the rest of our gels. The frame also holds silk or shiny blanket if need be. This works really well for waist up shots of people comig in a door. I put it behind them on the porch. The door opens normally.

Johnny Robinson
Johnny@johnnyrobinson.com


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Mark Suszko
Re: How to light subject (interior shot) and expose for background through window (exterior)?
on May 17, 2012 at 6:48:18 pm

Any more details on the frame, pictures, maybe?


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