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continuos lighting for video and photoshoots

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Gerardo Flores
continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Jun 12, 2011 at 5:46:04 pm

Regards Everyone

Im a photographer and in the las days Im trying to learn more and more about video.
Im thinking to get some continuos lighting for video but I will be love to use them in photography as well.
I will love to get some lights which allow me to control the quantity and the temperature of the lights more red like in the low lighting shots and more white similar to the daylight.

as well if will be possible if the lights can works with this generation of batteries and not be depending
if we have or not electricity connection in the location where we want to make to pictures.

I own this old ( but very good ) brown models of lights from speedotron and I really love them because
they are like a small tank which never will stop to work.... but I hate the cables and the connections around . I believe that in this days must be something that can allow me to make shots in the middle of no where whit a good batteries ( in the past we use a electricity generator when the electricity where not around )

I will like to know the best models ( price - performance ) and the more more expensive ones to compare them... links with examples are welcome


Best Regards

learning after effects


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Bill Davis
Re: continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Jun 13, 2011 at 12:40:39 am

Geraldo,

Creating a super-bright - properly color balanced light pulse for a fraction of a second is not particularly complicated nor particularly energy hungry.

Creating that SAME quality of light that needs to burn continuously for an HOUR of more is a whole different proposition.

There are three major technologies for continuous lights for video - and a couple of minor ones.

The majors are tungsten, fluorescent, and LED. The minors are HMI and Ceramic Discharge. (These are "minor" only in that they are typically either more expensive or less common than the "big 3")

Tungsten is the traditional video lighting gear. Well developed. Manufactured for a LONG time. Extremely flexible since manufactures have had decades to design and build many different kinds of fixtures and accessories to make it soft, hard, focused, pattern projecting and anything else you might need. But it's typically very power inefficient since much of the power you use goes up in heat.
The color temp of tungsten is fixed and dependable.

Fluorescent is increasingly popular - but less flexible than tungsten. It's more efficient and comes in a few useful form factors. In long tubes, it creates a broad soft source - much like a tungsten lamp in a soft box. In the more modern form factor of a spiral tube (kinda like a traditional bulb) it works "kinda" like tungsten, is more energy efficient - BUT has a limit as to the brightness and "throw" it can achieve.

LED is the most energy efficient of the three - but it's also the newest and the least developed technology. It doesn't work like any of the others since each LED is essentially it's own miniature spotlight. So it's MUCH more difficult to control than tungsten. A good example of this is that barn doors on a tungsten fresnel cuts the light off of a surface or scene cleanly - but the same barn door on a LED unit just masks some of the "spotlight" rows and yeilds an ugly "window blind" effect.

Both Fluorescent and LED are spectrum limited and can put out light that can appear too "green" under certain conditions.

I say all this so that you'll understand that there's a LOT about lighting for video that's different than flash photography. And you simply can't think about them the same way. You're asking for video lighting to work like flash photography - and it simply doesn't. Bright, portable, and relatively affordable? - that's flash photography. Video lighting is expensive, heavy, and generally a pain in the butt.

But it's also critical to good results since all any camera does is record reflected light.

Good luck.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Conner


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Gerardo Flores
Re: continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Jun 13, 2011 at 9:52:31 pm

Thank you Bill for your explanation.
Now I believe that lighting it is more complex that I thought
...

please read my answer to the next post Im sure you can recommend me something good.

learning after effects


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Scott Sheriff
Re: continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Jun 13, 2011 at 5:45:20 pm

[Gerardo Flores] "I will like to know the best models ( price - performance ) and the more more expensive ones to compare them... links with examples are welcome"

It just isn't that simple. That is like asking someone, whats the best house?

Best model for what? What do you generally shoot? Where? Whats your budget? You're going to need a couple grand just to get started with the most basic entry level set-up, if buying new. Or you can rent.

There are people in this industry that do nothing but light. So that should tell you it isn't a simple subject you can become an expert in overnight. Not to mention that dealing with lights is a hazard and liability that should not be taken lightly. Everyone that has done this for any length of time will have stories of something bad happening. And it often happens to the inexperienced. Florescent is less problematic in liability issues, but even they can present hazards.

In tungsten lighting there are really two choices for types of instruments. Open face instruments vs fresnels. There are pros and cons for each.
And then there is florescent, which again has pros and cons.
LED is pretty much for that 'sun-gun' type of use.
And then there are discharge lights like HMI, which even more expertise is needed to operated properly and safely.

"as well if will be possible if the lights can works with this generation of batteries and not be depending
if we have or not electricity connection in the location where we want to make to pictures.
"

Yes, if you just want a single on camera light for that 'breaking news' sun-gun look. Otherwise no.
In fact it is normal to need multiple circuits for even the simplest set-up.

"I will love to get some lights which allow me to control the quantity and the temperature of the lights more red like in the low lighting shots and more white similar to the daylight."

That is what gels and filters are for, and often some of this is now done in post.
There are other technical, and artistic requirements. Cameras all have an exposure range, that must be kept in mind when lighting. And in video/film, the look, or the mood is more often dictated by the amount light and dark in the shot. The location of highlights, shadow density, fall off. This is why you will also need a large selection of light control devices.

There are a lot of posts in this forum discussing the various merits of different brands/types of lights, you should check them out. The "what light should I get" question gets asked a lot.
One of the best ways to learn about lighting is to work for someone as an assistant.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com

I have a system, it has stuff in it, and stuff hooked to it. I have a camera, it can record stuff. I read the manuals, and know how to use this stuff and lots of other stuff too.
You should be suitably impressed...


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Gerardo Flores
Re: continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Jun 13, 2011 at 10:15:17 pm

Hi Scott.

Thank you for your comment...
I will really love to work in some project to learn more but it is difficult to get this places.

I know you will think is impossible what I want but if I done get some equipment I will never
really learn how to use them... i will like to expend between 2000 and 5000 dollars or in the worst case
10000... but less is for me better.

what I will like to get.
- strong light to illuminate big spaces at night
- couple of lights to shoot portraits ( individual to small groups )
- light for the camera like those ringlite from litepanels
- small led lights to put in small places like inside the cars or boxes etc

I mean the basic kit which will allow me to make a small video clip or a small advertisement spot.
I know that in many cases I will need to rent some specifics lights... but I will like to own the kit which allows me to play, learn and increase my knowledge of lighting

I saw your web site and there you got a lot of lights for rent but imagine that you are gonna
travel to make a video and you can NOT take all your lights with you....
you are gonna make footages on location and maybe some in studio... you got a lot of equipments but you got space just for 6 - 8 light units: Which of your lights you will take with you???

thank you again for your comment.

Best Regards

Gerardo

learning after effects


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Scott Sheriff
Re: continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Jun 14, 2011 at 7:38:01 am

[Gerardo Flores] "I know you will think is impossible what I want but if I done get some equipment I will never
really learn how to use them... i will like to expend between 2000 and 5000 dollars or in the worst case
10000... but less is for me better."


Heres my 2 cents. If you knew you had regular, specific jobs, it might be good to tailor the gear to those. But for a generic starter kit, I like tungsten lights. I think they are the most versatile, so that is where I would start.
I wouldn't spend it all at once. Maybe start with:
A kit with 4 lights, stands, barndoors. Fresnels are better, but a bit more fragile. Open face lights like Lowel DP, Omni, Tota are less delicate, less expensive, easy to field repair, but the don't look as good as Fresnels.
3-4 C stands with gobo arms.
A softbox attachment like a Chimera.
A selection of gels, ND, and color correction filters, screen.
Spare bulbs, lightmeter, C47's, leather gloves, voltmeter, high quality AC cords, sandbags, dull spray, cinefoil.
Buy other things as the need arises.

Not an 'end all, be all' list, by any stretch. Just some basics I could think of.

"what I will like to get.
- strong light to illuminate big spaces at night"

HMI, rent as needed. Maybe buy if you end up renting a lot.

"- couple of lights to shoot portraits ( individual to small groups )"
Pretty easy to do with 2-4 lights. Bounce card, softbox, umbrella. Or go with a Kino Flo type set-up.

"-light for the camera like those ringlite from litepanels"
I have no experience with these. For jewelry, coins, things like that I rig up a small light tent instead.

- small led lights to put in small places like inside the cars or boxes etc

These are super handy for this type of use, but not cheap. And the bigger panels are even more pricey. This would fall into that "buy if I shoot it a lot" category.

"imagine that you are gonna
travel to make a video and you can NOT take all your lights with you....
you are gonna make footages on location and maybe some in studio... you got a lot of equipments but you got space just for 6 - 8 light units: Which of your lights you will take with you???
"

I really don't have that much stuff, so I always take all of it, unless:
I need to rent nicer or bigger lights, or working in a studio with a grid which will always have their own lights, or the gig has a budget for a grip truck.

If you have to travel light, it helps to know what your facing if you really can only take the bare necessities. There are plenty of ways to economize on the number of instruments by careful planing, but it is nice to have a selection to choose from. And spares.

The nice thing about lights and grip gear is if you buy decent stuff, it will last forever. And it really doesn't go out of style.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com

I have a system, it has stuff in it, and stuff hooked to it. I have a camera, it can record stuff. I read the manuals, and know how to use this stuff and lots of other stuff too.
You should be suitably impressed...


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Gerardo Flores
Re: continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Jun 14, 2011 at 8:25:29 pm

Hi Scott

Thank you for your answer ;)
I will study and then add some comments

there are a lot of good information in your message that I need time to look
for an example of those lights you mention here

Thanks again...

learning after effects


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Gerardo Flores
Re: continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Jun 15, 2011 at 11:09:36 pm

wowwwwwww
A day light tungsten DAY light can cost 30000K a single one ... HUuuuu

it is interesting for me that you any mention the litepanels and i will likr to know
if there any other reason than just that they are expensive....

are those a good example???

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/752205-REG/Arri_571896P_ARRILITE_Fres...


anf Scott thank you a lot

learning after effects


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Scott Sheriff
Re: continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Jun 20, 2011 at 3:04:58 am

[Gerardo Flores] "it is interesting for me that you any mention the litepanels and i will likr to know
if there any other reason than just that they are expensive...."


Litepanels are are real good for some uses, but you can shape the light much better with something like the Arri kit you mentioned.
The other thing about LED and flo based lighting is that the color spectrum is not consistent. I think it is much easier to mix and match tungsten lights.
LED and flo's are great in some situations, and if you have a setup that they are better for, by all means use them. But IMHO tungsten lights are still a better choice for all around use.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com

I have a system, it has stuff in it, and stuff hooked to it. I have a camera, it can record stuff. I read the manuals, and know how to use this stuff and lots of other stuff too.
You should be suitably impressed...


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jim bachalo
Re: continuos lighting for video and photoshoots
on Aug 10, 2011 at 3:05:32 am

LED's also vary a great deal in their CRI. I have some inexpensive Z96's, and get fairly decent quality after a custom balance. I have another inexpensive 500LED and even after a custom balance the result is unusable without some tinkering in post.
So, if LED's, suggest trying and doing your own tests first. My next purchase will be one of the many fluorescent options out there, Kino Flo or one of the many Kino Flo 'clones' if I am confident the light quality is as good.

Local is the new global


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