FORUMS: list search recent posts

Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews

COW Forums : Lighting Design

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Anderson Black
Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 7, 2010 at 1:41:35 pm

I'm buying the LEDs as the key and fill for the subject but I'm looking for a light to throw on backgrounds to add some patterns and color to the scene.

Could you guys recommend some cost effective options? I just need 1 light.



Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 7, 2010 at 2:01:27 pm

Two words: Source Four

JS



Return to posts index

Mark Suszko
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 7, 2010 at 3:19:23 pm

Two more words:
back aches.

The Source Four Junior is a great and versatile light, but not what I would call easily portable.


Return to posts index


Dan Brockett
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 7, 2010 at 3:21:44 pm

I agree, a Source Four/Leko would be ideal for lighting BGs and throwing patterns. The only possible challenge might be that Source Fours/Lekos are relatively huge and heavy if you are a one man band or throwing a small kit together to travel.

Even though your LEDs are most probably daylight balanced, my favorite small and light travel BG light would be an Arri 300 or an Arri 650 Fresnel. Throw a piee of Cinefoil with some holes punched through it and perhaps a colored gel and life will be good. I mix daylight LED and tungsten a lot, it gives your BG light an appealing and instant warmth. Most of the directors I shoot for always want to warm up the BG, so this is an easy and effective way to do so.

Enjoy!

Dan

A Producer Who Is Also A DP? Yep, that's Me.

http://www.danbrockett.com


Return to posts index

Mark Suszko
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 7, 2010 at 4:41:02 pm

Dan, I do the same trick wth black foil, punched thru with random holes using a pen, and put in the gel frame of a Lowel Omni. One time I did this with two lights, one gelled blue the other, bare, and ion the places where their patterns overlapped, I got a very convincing sky/cloud effect. One of those serendiptous things.

My vote (as usual) would be for a Lowel Omni or Omni-Pro. Not as easy to use pattern gobos as the Source Four, but very easy to travel with.


Return to posts index

Anderson Black
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 7, 2010 at 5:17:08 pm

Thanks guys. Yeah I checked out the Source Four and it's too way heavy duty for my needs. I'm a one-man band. It seems like a solid pro-gear. Something you would use if you had a crew.

I was leaning more towards the tungsten and cinefoil+color gel combo and you guys confirmed that.

THANKS!



Return to posts index


Bill Davis
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 7, 2010 at 10:38:06 pm

I too think that you've got a problem.

If you bought LEDs in daylight, and you mix tungsten, then you're ONLY going to be able to do warm backgrounds/fill without losing a LOT of efficiency by doing CTB color correction. That means you'd likely NOT get enough punch out of a 150 - and possibly even a 300 fresnel. So you'll probably have to lug around a 650. Not fun. Remember one 650 fresnel will draw HALF the available power in a single 15A circuit. Leaving less for everything else. Same with a 750 Omni or similar.

Plus, you're going to have to lug around a much heavier gauge stinger to power one of those than you can use for EVERYTHING else.

See the issue? LED lights are ONLY soft/broad lights. They can't do anything else. But they're LESS soft than tungsten in a bag. They are efficient, but they are NOT cuttable and won't throw anything like a pattern.

That's part of why I STILL don't get why everyone seems to buy their LEDS in 5600k when they're also available in 3200 which balances MUCH better with 90% of the existing pro-lights on the planet.

But that's another topic for another day.



Return to posts index

Anderson Black
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 8, 2010 at 7:33:07 am

mmm interesting.
Ok here's what I was going to do, let me know what your opinion is of this gear.

To light subjects I was going to buy 1 LED 600 (5600k) and 2 LED 256 (5600k) from Cool Lights (http://www.coollights.biz/). Then use a tungsten to light the background, throw patter etc.

The reason I'm going with the 5600K over the 3200K is I figured I could use it outdoors as well.

What do you think of this set-up?



Return to posts index

Peter Ralph
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 8, 2010 at 3:21:41 pm

I use a 56K on cam light for run and gun - but daylight balanced fixtures have to be very beefy to have any impact on a scene lit by the sun.

For background/rim light I think the light is less important than the light stand - get an articulating/boom stand which allows you to position the fixture wherever you want.


Return to posts index


Todd Terry
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 8, 2010 at 3:32:26 pm

Personally, what I would do is use one or two small tungsten fresnel instruments for background. I personally use (and like) LTM Pepper instruments, but there are a lot of fans of the others out there as well (Arri, Mole, etc).

One issue you might run into with your daylight vs. tungsten theory is, that while it would be nice to use those instruments outside as well, they sure aren't going to have much punch for an exterior shoot. Maybe if you were shooting a fairly close shot of someone you could put it close enough to the talent (just out of frame) for it to do some good, but otherwise they are not going to be super effective. Think of it this way, if the color balance was right, how useful would a 650 tungsten be outdoors? Not very.

I'd say the main reason to buy daylight-balanced LED instruments would be so that you have the flexibility to mix with other daylight instruments for interior shoots... Kinos, HMIs, etc. Otherwise you might be better off with tungsten-balanced instruments.

All that being said, I personally think you can mix light temperatures a lot more that some people do. For example, I predominately do daylight lighting... usually with HMIs, and occasionally with flos. However I have no problem in many instances with using a tungsten fixture as a back/side/hair light. I often like the warmer look of the tungsten backlight. Same for lighting on backgrounds, sometimes if it is a bit warmer than the principal lighting that looks perfectly ok, often it is even desirable. Just depends on the exact look you are going for.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



Return to posts index

Anderson Black
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 8, 2010 at 3:52:05 pm

wow so many ideas!
I appreciate all this input.



Return to posts index

Steve Kownacki
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 9, 2010 at 12:26:59 am

Along with adulterating cinefoil, take a sabre saw to some 1/4" luan plywood and make some patterns on a 12x12" piece, stick it on a c-stand 2' in front of your 300 fresnel and play with the focus for different effects. If you're in retail locations, I've lit backgrounds with the track lights already in place - you can get the cookie up there too. With a little effort you can make a cinefoil snoot on the 300; cut the customer logo out of cardboard and blast it on the background. If you have a projector & laptop, make up some patterns and shoot that on the back wall. Try small 150s uplighting from the floor, close to the wall. Gell 'em to the customers corporate colors and you'll be a genius.

What type of background are you trying to light? Muslin, retail, office wall?

Steve






Return to posts index


Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 9, 2010 at 5:51:50 am

I would hardly call a Source 4 Junior heavy. In terms of flexibility, if I only had one choice of instrument to take with me on a shoot -- it would be a Source 4 Junior zoom.
If you want a lighter/smaller fixture to light your backgrounds however then buy a Dedo light with Projector lens.

DS



Return to posts index

Bill Davis
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 9, 2010 at 6:57:20 am

Wow, I'm a bit confused by this approach.

These type of theatrical LEKOs are designed to throw a hard edge barn-doorable beam in a stage setting - yeah, often with a patterned GOBO which they excell at - but at distances from 15-30 feet. Which is pretty impractical for a video shoot where we seldom have distances like that to work with.

I think that's a WHOLE LOT more light than you need, and I've actually never seen one of these on a video set I've ever worked on.

Heck, I have a little Altman Micro-Elipse that I use to throw LOGOS into interviews and I've carried it out in the field a couple of times - and every time it's suffered. These are NOT designed as portable lights. At ALL.

I agree the the DEDO is a better choice - but it's price point makes it something that only working pros can typically justify.

Ah, the endless world of lighting gear.



Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 9, 2010 at 3:34:14 pm

Bill,

I use the Source Fours almost every time I do sit down interviews. To spread them large enough to cover the backgrounds at short distances I equip mine with 50 degree lenses and use a dimmer to control the brightness. It's true that they are a little awkward to transport and case (although it can be done) so when I travel on airplanes I'll take a kit of Dedo lights instead, but using them in a different way, usually to create several "splashes" of light or lit objects rather than a wide pattern which the S4 does.

JS



Return to posts index


Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 10, 2010 at 3:54:35 am

Don't be confused ...be bold -- and open to anything.
Most of my colleagues use Source 4's just as extensively as I do. I must admit however, 30 years ago (when I started bringing such instrumentation into active video lighting) most of my colleagues scoffed just as you do.
As lighting designers we must be able to work with light in all forms; especially when we're not always given the form we want. I successfully use ellipsoidals (especially the Source 4) for lighting faces at distances from 6 feet to 60 feet. There's not a single video shoot I do -- from a small hotel room interview with a Diane Sawyer, Joan Rivers, or Barbara Walters to a major studio shoot -- where at least 50% of my fixtures aren't Source 4 lekos. It's my main choice of instrument for key lighting.
As for being my "weapon" of choice if I were only allowed one lighting instrument on a shoot, I leave you this thought -- you can't make a soft light hard .... but you can always make a hard light soft. The simple $300 Source 4 is much more versatle than any other instrument available.

DS



Return to posts index

Bill Davis
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 11, 2010 at 1:30:54 am

OK.

I'm willing to learn.

I would LOVE to see a photo of how you pack and transport these puppies without the lamps getting knocked from the sockets and constantly bending those fragile leaf steel barn door controls? I'm dying to know. I tried to take my MicroElipse out a few times and even in a pick and pluck foam case, those controls come back bent EVERY TIME.

You've got to admit that Lekos were designed to hang on a grid in a theatrical setting. And while I don't doubt for a second that they CAN be adapted to field production, I'd like to know how you've overcome all the little details. Particularly the PACKING and TRAVELING stuff.

A set of Arri Fresnels, for example, can go in and out of a foam Arri Case inset a thousand times and NOTHING about the design will compromise either the fixture, the powercord OR the attached light modifying equipment. Even the "twist lock" lamp holder is immune from disengagement.

I took an elipsoidal on a shoot once after trying to pack it as carefully as possible. And it took me a while return with a pair of needle nose pliers to get it's exterior beam shaping leaf controls straightened out.

And the power cords were always having to be re-worked since it appeared that they weren't designed for coiling and travel as, for example the Arri designs.

Clearly you've overcome these issues which is excellent. Care to share any secrets?


BTW, it's probably an aprocryphyl story - but I was once told by a NYC old-timer that Ms. Walters contract SPECIFIED the sizes of the soft boxes that were to be used on her key lights as she grew older.

Even a 55degree leko is going to have trouble filling the front of a 3x4 Chimera from the distance of a common speed ring, isn't it? How do you get it to fill the front silk? Honestly. At least one enquiring mind in Arizona is definitely open to the possibilities, but I'm having trouble with the concepts.



Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 11, 2010 at 2:20:57 am

Maybe Dennis will chime in here too, but having worked on lighting BW on the West Coast many times over the years for 20/20 and the Oscar Specials, I can tell you that we never lit her with softboxes as keys. Always a spot fresnel with a showcard snoot (black and white - with white side out) was used, with a little white diffusion clipped inside the doors near the lens. A 2K zip was most often the fill light coming from below and on the other side.

We varied from this only occasionally when there was overwhelming daylight in the room, usually because of ceiling high windows in every direction. In this case we'd use an 800 or 1200 HMI in a similar configuration.

In all other cases I will use a small chimera as the key, and actually have taken to using two lately, both a small and right next to it a xs, which effectively wraps one light source (and one specular in the eyes) around the female subject in a very glamorous hi-key way. I was always annoyed by the hard chin shadow and occasional hand shadows created my the hard light technique, but who was I to say anything? In addition, more and more the divas are demanding a Dedo or other little spot light just off camera on the key side as a "clean-up", whereas my inclination is to keep it simple and single source, but somehow nowadays, we're using six (or more) lights on a high end head shot (that's counting three backlights).

JS



JS



Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 11, 2010 at 7:19:25 am

For many years, I lit 20/20 in New York, along with dozens and dozens of Barbara's specials -- in addtion to consulting on THE VIEW when it went on air. She was almost always lit with a soft chimera surround (large lightbanks, with 5kw fresnels as the source), and a single hard key at the camera (usually a 19 or 26 degree ellipsoidal on a stand slightly softened with a light diffusion) plus a 1kw fresnel diffused floor light (much like John described) to fill in the shadows from below. The relatively large "firepower" was necessary because the set was so large and distance from camera lens to home base talent was about 10 feet, or more. When lighting in a smaller space the same exact "design" was used ... just with lower wattages and smaller fixtures (such as a 650w baby soft or 1 x 1 light panel from below and a 36 degree Jr as a main key, and small chimeras or Kino diva's as fill).
Don't believe everything you hear some star said or specified, as apocryphy runs rampant in our industry. Years ago, when chimeras were starting to become popular, I latched onto them for all my
shows, but not because Barbara Walters demanded them (as an early Chimera catalogue once said in describing my work and use of chimeras). The 4kw and 8kw softlights we previously used as the standard "weapon" were ridiculously heavy and hard to control without wasting an unbelievable amount of time flagging. A lightbank with a 30 or 60 degree honeycomb provided a soft beam of light with extremely good control -- without spending a lot of time shaping the beam and flagging it off other talent, walls, and projection screens (which started to become very popular).
Regarding the fragile nature of ellipsoidals (specifically Source 4 "lekos") ..... if they weren't able to travel well, they wouldn't be the standard instrument of choice for dozens upon dozens of theatrical productions collectively using thousands upon thousands of fixtures touring in trucks all over the world. A standard stage production will travel with a few hundred lekos mounted on pipes or truss and not in cases at all. When I do shows they are sent from shop to site and back, thrown in hampers or road boxes -- with minimal padding. I have seen a lot of ENG shooters (who work hard for the money to buy their one or two fixtures) successfully create cases for them, using a variety of materials from bubble wrap, to sonex, to carved foam, and simply funiture pads.
One comment I will make regarding the problem you're having with the shutters (the "fragile leaf steel barn door controls"), don't leave them pulled out. The shutters should always be pushed inward. The 4 shutters will make contact with each other internally and provide a lot of rigid support for protection.



Return to posts index

Anderson Black
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 11, 2010 at 3:33:24 pm

From what I'm reading here it seems like a lot of you pros are not using LEDs. Are there too many disadvantages and what are they from your experiences?



Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 11, 2010 at 4:31:07 pm

Anderson,

I don't think that's a fair conclusion. I for one, will use whatever tool is best and appropriate for the job. I end up committing to a tool by buying it because that's my business model and the logistics of having to drive across LA to Burbank to pick up a rental and then returning it after the job seems to take all the fun (and profit) out of it. On that basis it is fair to say that I've limited my LED light purchases to a few on-camera LitePanels and Zylights. That is not to say that I wouldn't want some 1x1's but at this point I find them tremendously overpriced. Furthermore I find that the LitePanels are really color correct, which becomes an issue when you use them in combination with conventional photo grade tungsten units.

There are many pros who swear by these LED lights, and it's true that more and more examples keep coming to market, including some that imitate the spot and flood characteristics of a conventional fresnel. The qualities of low power, low temperature and variable color inevitably will make these units more practical and common, especial as economy of scale and competition drive the prices down. The bottom line is that at present one can usually find a more conventional unit to do the same function as an LED at a cheaper price; that is not to deny the "sexiness" of the LED technology.

JS



JS



Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 11, 2010 at 4:34:07 pm

I meant to say that the LitePanels are "not" really color correct.

JS



Return to posts index

Anderson Black
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 11, 2010 at 8:45:50 pm

John thanks a lot for that viewpoint. I like your approach to things.

Yes I do find that there are various lighting techs with varying opinions on the matter from my research. At the end of the day you make a decision you have to live with whatever challenges arises and work around them.

Thanks.



Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 13, 2010 at 5:34:23 am

"Even a 55degree leko is going to have trouble filling the front of a 3x4 Chimera from the distance of a common speed ring, isn't it? How do you get it to fill the front silk?

BILL: I'm very sorry, I got so long-winded in my response to lighting with lekos that I forgot to answer your direct question above.
I get the beam of light to fill the entire front silk in a lightbank by simply removing the lens barrel, creating a strong, wide, fairly diffuse light source. I've even taped tough spun over it to make a softlight. Shoot it through a diffuser to make it even softer if you wish.
Experiment and have fun. Just because a company makes an instrument to do one function, it doesn't mean you must use it for that function -- as is evidenced by the dozens of HOME DEPOT L.D.'s supplying their "Rube Goldberg" techniques to the FORUM over the years.

DS



Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 24, 2010 at 10:47:23 pm

[Dennis Size] "if I only had one choice of instrument to take with me on a shoot -- it would be a Source 4 Junior zoom."

I learned about this instrument on this forum and it has been a fantastic addition to the kit. I do wish it were smaller, and had a wider angle.

But my only real problem with the Source Four Jr Zoom has been the (im)balance on the yoke arm. It seems as if I have to crank the tightening handle like crazy to keep it from dropping after I walk away. So adjusting the angle turns into a major PITA. Is there something I'm missing here, or is there something I can do to the yoke arm to make tightening and adjusting its angle easier?

Bob C


Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 27, 2010 at 8:53:36 am

Wider? WOW...a 50 degree lens is pretty wide (although you could get full sized lekos with 70 and 90 degree lenses). With your lens set at 50 degrees, at a distance of 15' you should be able to get a beam diameter of almost 14'-0".

The Source 4 is known for its positive locking, hand-operated yoke clutch. I'm surprised you're having a problem getting it to stay in position. Normally the only Source 4 I've ever had issues with are full sized units with a big 5 deg lens (which causes it to be front heavy). You should take it to your dealer as ask what you might be doing wrong -- or what's wrong with the fixture you have.

DS



Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 27, 2010 at 1:31:04 pm

[Dennis Size] "its positive locking, hand-operated yoke clutch. I'm surprised you're having a problem getting it to stay in position."

Thanks for that; I've fought this thing for years, but I figured if Dennis Size said it should work easily, I should take a good look at the clutch. Turned out that it was very difficult getting the handle off the bolt due to a mis-thread. The threads inside the handle are toast, so I'll be ordering a new one. I bought it used; this may be why it was so inexpensive.

As for the wide angle: I am often in small rooms for interviews, & like to use multiple camera angles, which require a lot of coverage in a short throw.

Thanks again. The Source 4 Jr. Zoom has long been one of my favorite fixtures, and now it will be even better.

I agree that for traveling light (no pun intended), a good fresnel and some blackwrap with punched holes can do wonders. I use a Tweenie (650 watt), which seems to do the trick.

Bob C


Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 27, 2010 at 9:47:26 pm

[Bob Cole] "[Dennis Size] "its positive locking, hand-operated yoke clutch. I'm surprised you're having a problem getting it to stay in position."

Thanks for that; I've fought this thing for years, but I figured if Dennis Size said it should work easily, I should take a good look at the clutch."


Another nice thing about the Source 4: I just picked up a new locking handle and bolt at my local lighting store. Total charge: $1.75. I suspect that from any "movie-related" lighting fixture vendor, the part would have cost multiples of that.

And, Dennis, that solved it. Thanks.

Bob C


Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 29, 2010 at 5:03:48 am

Glad to be of help.
Usually when I'm stuck lighting a hotel room I order several source 4 juniors (fixed lens at 50 deg) so I can get plenty of "texture coverage" on my backgrounds. I also use 375w lamps -- which is more than enough intensity -- to avoid blowing breakers.
Necessity being the "mother of invention" I too have very often used black wrap gobos in front of fresnels. By the way, you'll find the texture is "stronger" when you remove the lens.
You should also try cutting various textures out of heavy gauge broiler pans that you've cut to the size of your fixture's color frame. They're easy to carry around and having a variety pre-cut and ready to slide in front of your fixture saves time.
DS



Return to posts index

Rick Amundson
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 29, 2010 at 3:19:40 pm

Dennis,

Love the broiler pan idea!

Best of luck!

Rick Amundson
Producer/Director/DP
Screenscape Studios
Bravo Romeo Entertainment
http://www.screenscapestudios.com
http://www.bravoromeo.com
http://www.indeliblemovie.com


Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 31, 2010 at 5:07:07 am

[Dennis Size] "cutting various textures out of heavy gauge broiler pans"

Disposables, I assume. I'll have to buy the three-pack next for next Thanksgiving dinner: one for the kitchen, two for the lighting kit.

[Dennis Size] "Necessity being the "mother of invention" I too have very often used black wrap gobos in front of fresnels. By the way, you'll find the texture is "stronger" when you remove the lens."

iow - turn a fresnel into an open face light?


Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 31, 2010 at 5:30:00 am

.....or just say the "hell with the turkey", and spend the whole Thanksgiving day off cutting gobos out of all the broiler tins! :-)

It's no fun if you can't 'bastardize' the fixtures.
The head of the lighting division of ARRI once asked me "Can't you ever just use a light the way we made it?" :-) ;-)

DS



Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 31, 2010 at 5:45:49 am

[Dennis Size] ".....or just say the "hell with the turkey", and spend the whole Thanksgiving day off cutting gobos out of all the broiler tins! :-)"

Or use the broiler tins first, don't QUITE clean them off, and on your next shoot, enjoy the memorable odors of holidays past.


Return to posts index

Mark Suszko
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 31, 2010 at 4:30:35 pm


[Dennis Size] "Necessity being the "mother of invention" I too have very often used black wrap gobos in front of fresnels. By the way, you'll find the texture is "stronger" when you remove the lens."

(Bob Cole) in other words - turn a fresnel into an open face light?


ROTFL


Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 31, 2010 at 4:37:38 pm

Not an open face as much as a point-source!

JS



Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 31, 2010 at 4:50:47 pm

[john sharaf] "Not an open face as much as a point-source!"

Thanks John -- I get what Dennis meant now. A fresnel with its tiny reflector is much "pointier" than an open face, right? I have so much to learn in 2011. I think it might take at least a full year.

HNY, everybody. Your generosity with sharing your experiences and expertise has helped me immensely with lighting, which is a part of my work that I really enjoy.

Bob C


Return to posts index

Todd Terry
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 31, 2010 at 4:51:06 pm

You do what you gotta do.

I remember years ago on a location shoot scrambling to an AutoZone store to grab a couple of those silver pop-up windshield sunscreens to use as reflectors in an pinch. People looked at me like I was nuts, but they worked like a charm.

If it works, do it!

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 1, 2011 at 1:31:19 am

Terry, I appreciate your ingenuity. I like your story about the home-made ring light too. Very inspirational.

And I'm also glad there are people on this forum on the other end of the spectrum because I love to learn about new fixtures and techniques. I ran into a DP of a major HBO series a couple years ago, and started asking him what lighting instruments he typically chose. He looked a little bewildered by the premise of the question, and said, "Well, I use everything." With me, it's "what can I manage with what I have" but for him, it's simply "what does this scene need?"

It's a different mind-set, which I respect as much as the "ingenious class." I wonder how people who work in major production centers and have access to "everything" keep their focus.


Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 2, 2011 at 8:30:35 am

"I remember years ago on a location shoot scrambling to an AutoZone store to grab a couple of those silver pop-up windshield sunscreens to use as reflectors in an pinch. People looked at me like I was nuts, but they worked like a charm."

BINGO TERRY. It's important to recognize what's needed to solve a problem and then create the solution based on what's available. Even when working for major companies it doesn't necessarily mean they'll give you what is really needed.

A few years ago I was hired by one of the "BIG 5" Networks to light their anchor booth skyboxes for the Democratic and Republican Conventions. I've been doing Presidential Conventions for 30 years. Back "in the day", money didn't seem to be an object -- currently it's the driving force. At Mile High Stadium in Denver we had no budget allocated, no manpower, and no time. The skyboxes had minimal power and we weren't able to do the major rigging that used to be done. These skyboxes, incidentally, have 6'-6" ceilings. Since the booth was going to be active 15 hours a day, with several anchors coming and going, I needed to also make sure the heat issues were considered. Ultimately I ended up sticking aluminum foil to the half the ceiling and walls of the booth and putting several inexpensive Kino Flos on stands behind the 3 cameras at various angles to bounce the light around them from above and the the sides onto the talent. It actually created quite a lovely soft wash of light on the anchors. When you looked up to the booth from the convention floor and podium it was the oddest looking thing and people keep asking me what was going on. I just winked and said we were dealing with an RF interference problem!

DS



Return to posts index

Anderson Black
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 11, 2010 at 3:23:38 pm

My internet was down for a few days, glad to see more input.

Steve, I don't have a specific project at the moment. I'm putting together equipment so I can start experimenting and be ready to roll once I land a gig.



Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 13, 2010 at 5:22:33 am

Actually Anderson many of us ARE using LED's.
The dictate from most of our clients these days is to be totally "green". Energy efficient fixtures that utilize minimal electricity, generate minimal heat, and require even less labor to maintain them, are the "marching orders" we live with on many of our current projects.
We designed the main BLOOMBERG Network Newsroom Studio using 100 LED fixtures as keylights.
Next week I am installing a Press Room facility in Africa for a presidential palace. The "studio" of 50 instruments is a mix of LED, Fluorescent, and CDM fixtures. I also did many other installations recently, such as the White House Press Room (where over 50 Lite-Panels were used), the State Department, the United Nations, ATLANTIC Media, the American Enterprise Institute (just finished last week with 30 color Kinetics iWhite LED fixtures), and 3 studios for CBS Radio -- yep, RADIO! -- that I finished last month using over 50 Color Kinetics eWhite LED's as keylights.
We currently have proposals submitted to a few television networks for major studios using all LED's in conventional instrumentation (such as lekos, fresnels, softlights).
The world and the lighting technology we use is changing FAST!
DS



Return to posts index

Bill Davis
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 13, 2010 at 9:06:07 pm

Dennis,

Thanks so much for your detailed and informed responses. It's clear that even at the "top of the game" the changes in technology are making things complex.

I hope the younger guys here are noticing that no matter WHAT level of the industry one works in - the ability to think and adapt and consider alternatives to the way you might have originally done something (or the way you were "trained") is critical to success in the long term.

The vast majority of my practice here in AZ has been "run and gun" EFP. And so the thought of adapting theatrical lights to field video production has never been much of a "front of mind" concept.

Since I own a small studio, however, I do use a few old-style lekos - primarily for pattern projection. As a final warning to the young guys coming up the ranks who are more used to new technology like color balanced Fluors and LED lights - I did notice about an hour ago when setting a pattern in one that I hadn't used in about a year, that even if you turn the old guys on for say - 15 seconds with a pattern in the pattern holder - then you try to remove said pattern while neglecting to put your gloves on - you get a NASTY reminder in the form of an "idiot burn."

Forewarned is forearmed.

Thanks again, Dennis for the info.

You'll get a laugh



Return to posts index

Anderson Black
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 15, 2010 at 8:25:28 am

wow Dennis it is indeed changing. That's a lot of clients requesting LEDS. All the best with the gigs.



Return to posts index

Steve Kownacki
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 30, 2010 at 8:26:15 pm

I was so driven by this thread that I tried out the F4 and I am humbly thrilled with the capabilities - Go COW! They rent pretty cheap by the week and can get the gobos out the wazoo. Purchased 2 adapter clamps to put 'em on c-stands. The pic is my foray into product photos in a light tent.


Happy New Year to all of you!

Steve






Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Dec 31, 2010 at 4:50:26 am

Good for you Steve! Congratulations.
The adapter you've purchased is also called a TVMP adapter.

DS



Return to posts index

David Speace
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 5, 2011 at 9:06:19 pm

I really enjoyed reading this post! For background lighting I have been using the small projector that LTM makes... I have 2 of them. They take 2 1/2" inch cookies (cucaloris to be exact)and I use either an LTM 200w or Strand Mizer with these projectors. By the way... to be accurate gobos are not cookies! A gobo is an opaque flag used to cut, shape and/or block light. I am attaching a couple of photos so you can see this small projector. A comment about using a projector and cookie...it is desirable to project the cookie so that it is a little out of focus. I've been at venues where the lighting director projects all the cookies with a hard edge... and then if they are being controlled by techno beams... it's a little much! The effect should be subtle and not draw attention to itself!

I am also a fan of tungsten lights, especially fresnels. You need to have 2 or 3 in your kit if you are doing interviews. My approach to using fresnels is to use lower wattages, like 150w, 200w, 500w. Today's cameras a very sensitive vs what they were 10 years ago! I have 2 Strand Bambinos, which are 500w, but if I need more light I can bump them up to 650w by changing the bulb. I also use Lowel's Rifa lights with egg crates, which is lowel's version of a Chimera. The difference is that the Lowel Rifa pops open like an umbrella... you just put the diffusion on the front and your are ready to go. Very quick setup! The Chimera is more erector set like and you have to, with a little struggle, bend and stick the wire frames into the speed ring. I always feel like I am breaking my fingers when I am setting up a Chimera! Using egg crates in front of Rifa or Chimera softens the light even more... and will help hide shadows that may fall on the background!

I feel like I am writing a book... so bear with me! When I was in college in the 70s I had Gerald Millerson in my video production class. Some of you old timers might remember that Millerson was a BBC engineer who wrote about a dozen text books on tv production and lighting... Millerson's approach was to light film style...he was a stickler for doing 3-point light correctly...key, fill and back light. For interviews the key light does not go where the camera is, but is determined by where the talent's nose is pointing! So if you have a subject who is being interviewed looking off camera at the interviewer... then the key light is setup so that the interviewer is between the key light and the camera... this is so that the fat side of the subject's face is towards the camera and the shadow that is created by the light is cast across the face... the key light should also be from "above" so that the key light casts the shadow down... this is what creates the 3d look that is needed in this 2-dimensional medium! It drives me crazy when dp's and lighting directors put a light on the floor, and shine it up on the person's face! This light flattens the image... in fact, it is a very unflattering light... think about when you where a kid on Halloween and shined a flashlight pointing up from your chin... casting the shadows on your face up... and scaring all your friends! I call this the Katie Couric light! Think about this...or try this...then next time you are lighting an interview... make the floor light the first light that you setup and turn on! Seat your talent down and take a look at what that light is doing. Then ask yourself this... are you turning on all the other lights... in order to create flattering light for your talent or are you turning them on just to overcome what the unflattering floor light has created? You've created flat lighting and a shadowless face! And of course, when Katie is asking questions and waving her hands around... oops look at all the shadows being cast on her face by the floor light... very annoying to say the least!

I'll be back tomorrow to add some more thoughts, especially about the Leko lights. I have shot video on the Good Morning America set... so I can tell you exactly what they do! I will also talk about LED lights... yes they are way over priced! Here are the pictures of the LTM projector.






Return to posts index

David Speace
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 5, 2011 at 9:07:47 pm

Here's the third picture. Cookies!



Dave Speace
Producer/Director/DP
DZP Video

Windows 7, 64 Bit, i7 8 Core, 16Gb Ram, GeForce 4800


Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 5, 2011 at 9:17:38 pm

David,

My understanding of "gobo" is anything that's placed between a light and the subject, i.e. "go-between", so technically the "patterns" in your picture that you use in your projector lights are gobos too.

In addition a cook, cookie or cucalouris is a more practical shadow maker placed at some distance from the light to create a broken shadow pattern, along the line of Dennis' broiler pans with holes punched in them, or black wrap used the same way. Commercial cooks are made from wood or cello and can be purchased from grip equipment manufacturers and have the advantage of being predictable and reusable, although they are difficult to store and transport unless you gave a grip truck.

JS



Return to posts index

Todd Terry
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 5, 2011 at 9:48:05 pm

Maybe it's all just semantics, and it's backwards from what David spelled out... but most of the time when someone asks you for a "gobo," they mean this...



... and when they ask for a cucaloris or "cookie" they mean....



Now, that may (or may not be) technically correct. But that's what 99% of the DPs and grips out there call these two things (and is what you'll get if you ask someone to hand you one, or set one up).

I am interested in the LTM projector though, David (hesitating to call it a gobo projector...ha). I haven't seen that. Is that a sort of snoot-like device that will fit on any appropriately sized LTM head? Or is it all one unit that was purchased together? I have lots of LTM Pepper heads, and they look just like that. I wouldn't mind having one of the snoots if that can be added to an existing instrument.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



Return to posts index

Todd Terry
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 5, 2011 at 9:59:40 pm

Ahhh... I think I found them...

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/125384-REG/LTM_PA_9005_Focal_Spot_for...


It will certainly fit some of the Peppers we have (we mostly have bigger instruments but do have a few of the little 100/200 heads). I might get one, although they seem just a smidge pricey for what you get.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



Return to posts index

john sharaf
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 5, 2011 at 10:01:30 pm

Todd,

That's about what I pay for a complete Source Four!

JS



Return to posts index

Todd Terry
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 5, 2011 at 10:12:15 pm

That's what I was just thinking, John. And that's just for the snoot/projector. The Pepper head it fits on is about another $200, if I recall, so you're looking at a pushing-$500 instrument.

On the upside, the Peppers are built like tanks and the particular instrument that snoot fits on is only about the size of your fist... such is the tradeoff. As is often the case in life.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 5, 2011 at 10:43:31 pm

Thanks for that rec., Todd. The LTM focal spot looks fantastic.
I've already added that LTM focal spot to my wishlist - traveling "light" looks better every month -- and I've already got the M series "PATTERNS" (don't want to get into the Great Gobo Debate) from my Source 4 Junior Zoom.

Do you find that the output is anything close to the Source 4 Jr. Zoom?

[john sharaf] "That's about what I pay for a complete Source Four!"

True, John, but you have a truck!

Regarding the fragility of the shutter leaves, Dennis is absolutely correct (what an original statement that is); if you push them in they're quite sturdy. I was a little afraid of that myself, but several years into hauling the Source 4 Jr. Zoom around the country, usually inside a Pelican case with no particular padding except bubble wrap, it looks just about new.

Bob C


Return to posts index

Todd Terry
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 5, 2011 at 11:00:35 pm

[Bob Cole] "Do you find that the output is anything close to the Source 4 Jr. Zoom?"

I haven't used both (maybe David has), but I'm sure betting not. I think the Source 4 Jrs take 575w lamps, if I recall. The little Pepper instrument that device fits on is just a 100 or 200, depending on how it is lamped. I often use them directly to throw a little splash on backgrounds or as a small special... but they are not all that bright especially if there are a number of brighter instruments in your lighting plot. They're useful, though. I'm not sure how well gobo projection would stand out on a well-lit scene... but I guess that subtly is part of the idea. Just don't want it to be so subtle you can't see it at all, of course.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 6, 2011 at 4:53:34 am

DAVID.....That was a great post ...very informative, and easy to understand. I also am very impressed you studied with Millerson, a favorite L.D. of mine, who wrote the "bible" for television lighting -- albeit from a very British sensibility (that is sometimes confusing for many American technicians).
Regarding your explanation of templates, or patterns, (more words describing "gobos") I would tend to agree with John and Todd however.
I find that semantics often becomes counterproductive, and useless, if the gaffers/grips hanging my shows don't understand what I'm asking for. I work all over the world and everyone has a different way of asking for their carmel colored soda water (usually Coke). Normally, rather than trying to re-invent the wheel, I try to find out what a particular studio's crew calls the tools they work with and that's the terminoloigy I'll adapt myself to using.
As for the LTM Pepper with the ellipsoidal lens attachment, it's output is often not enough intensity (especially compared to a Source 4.) IF the Source 4 is too big, but you still need more intensity, go with the Dedo light and it's lens accessory. It's got more "bang" for it's expensive buck.

By the way, I shall be anxious to hear your impressions about the lighting for GOOD MORNING AMERICA. My company designed that two-floored studio facility in Times square, and I designed the show's lighting (several times).

Dennis



Return to posts index

Steve Kownacki
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 6, 2011 at 11:34:45 am

I'll agree with the Pepper getting lost in a lit scene. Plus if you're doing multiple setups those peppers stay hot for a long time after being shut off. If I have to pack and move quickly I'd sooner use an Arri 150 fresnel because they cool faster. This cold weather in the east makes it easy this time of year - we just take 'em outside to chill. I mentioned earlier I'm totally sold on the Source4 now. It's not that big and I'd sooner have to cut down/flag/dim/cookie/gobo output on a single fixture than use multiple lights.

I can't remember if the original poster ever stated what type of background he was trying to light. Muslin, studio set, office location? Or how big his crew was. All that would play a huge part in deciding what to do. There were a few mentions of Dennis' truck. I jam pack a mini van and my LD would do the same on a larger shoot. Guess this would tie into the biz/marketing forum now about charging for what you offer and be able to afford the proper transportation - even if you rent a truck for $50. Most associations I deal with have their staff rent cars for out-of-town trips because it's more cost-effective than paying the employee mileage. Just like you rent gear, I get the right vehicle too. A full-size van on shoots that need a more run-n-gun approach would be more effective if I can have easier access to the gear without constantly re-packing and burying in a small vehicle.

Steve






Return to posts index

David Speace
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 8, 2011 at 4:02:00 am

Dennis,

Somewhere along the way I picked up the idea that a cookie was a pattern that you could punch light through, whether it was a small metal disk or big wooden frame... anyway I think I will just go with the flow... gobo it is! I agree the 200w Pepper w/ projector isn't as bright as other lights, but it has worked for me... like I said before... I tend to use lower wattage lights... Rifas w/ egg crates that help keep the light off the background... so the pattern will have enough punch for me in most of my setups. What's nice about my lights is that I can put the projector on a Strand 500w Bambino. There are 2 different size flanges/adapters. I should take a picture...for all to see. I also have a couple of Stand Mizers, also 200w, that do a pretty good job with this projector. The Strand Mizers I picked up on ebay for about $70 apiece... they hung in a studio at Paramount... they were painted gold at one point and then repainted black... when I opened the light to check the bulb and the condition of the inside of these Mizers... I found the insides were brand new... they had never been turned on! I had 2 Arri 150s that kind of wore out on me... I had to rewire the insides a couple of times... so I sold them on ebay... replaced them with the Mizers... and pocketed the difference!

Now for the good part... I was impressed to see that you are the guy who did the lighting for Good Morning America... I had the opportunity while shooting for WPVI 6ABC's local magazine shows to go up to New York to interview Robin Roberts on the Good Morning America set... we used the interview area upstairs. But before we did I shot some b-roll in the studio while the show was going on... total controlled chaos! What most people don't realize is that the live audience in the studio stands all around watching the show... when a segment ends and they move from the cooking area to the couch... the floor managers herd the audience around... while the cameras and lights are being pushed to the next setup! Push lights you ask? This is the part that I found really interesting... for the women on the set... Robin Roberts and Diane Sawyer... there is are 2 grips with an ellipsoidal spot light on a stand w/ wheels (not sure if they were Source4s... about eye level high and each is aimed at Diane and Robin...and the light hits them directly in the face... but the light has a piece of tough spun in the gate... it is already so bright in the studio... (your big 1K, 2K and 5K instruments really light up that studio) that the technician has to pull the tough spun out and drop it back in the light... he does this a couple of times to make sure the light is hitting Diane or Robin's face! They have to position themselves between the cameras... it just seems a little much! But that's what they do. The other thing that I noticed was the studio was equipped with HMI lights as well as tungsten... side by side... so I guess if it was really bright and sunny outside... they kid turn on the HMI's to get a better indoor outdoor color balance. Of course, now they may have LED lights in that studio or not. The day we went up there was the same day the shooting happened a Virginia Tech... after the shoot we went to ABC World News to interview Bob Woodruff... he wasn't there, his manager told him the interview was going to be in Connecticut... so we left... about half hour after we left I can imagine all hell broke loose at the network news desk... because of the Va Tech shooting... it would have been interesting to see that!

Lately, I have been using some LED lights for lighting my interviews. These are lights that I have designed and built myself. I found a supplier for the panel... 36 lensed LEDs... they put out about 400w...5500K I designed a frame for the panel and it uses a grip pin... so the light is designed to be used with grip equipment... grip heads, etc. I call the light the Grip-LED! I am selling it on ebay...check it out.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=290520383244&ssPageName=...

Thanks, this has been fun talking about all this stuff.

Dave Speace
Producer/Director/DP
DZP Video

Windows 7, 64 Bit, i7 8 Core, 16Gb Ram, GeForce 4800


Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 8, 2011 at 4:43:18 am

Yep.... you probably missed earlier posts when I've noted that I actually use 26 degree Source 4 lekos (full sized) as "eyelights"! You can't get better control.

As a sidenote ...I also was the lighting designer for the WORLD NEWS TONIGHT studio you were at.

DS



Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 8, 2011 at 5:07:24 am

[Dennis Size] "I actually use 26 degree Source 4 lekos (full sized) as "eyelights"!"

That is very interesting. Could you say more about this? I've wondered about the subtle line that separates an eyelight from a key. I always thought eyelights were very small. In the discussion of the "Cincinnati Kid" big poker scene, there were references to "eyelights" but I thought that they looked like keys positioned right next to the camera. Eyelights and keys at the same time, actually.

David Speace mentioned a dislike for Katie Couric's floorlight. I kind of like this effect, though it may look better on faces with lots of structure. I noticed in the DVD "Visions of Light" that some famous DPs used a small rectangular light (about 6" x 12") attached to the camera, underneath the lens. I'm guessing this is a glamour light, particularly for females, to keep deep shadows from forming under chin, nose and eyebrows. So if this is not an eyelight is it a chinlight?

Bob C


Return to posts index

David Speace
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 12, 2011 at 4:01:18 pm

Bob,

Light from above which casts the shadows down....nose, eyes, and chin...this is what helps create a 3D look to the subjects face. Remember this is a 2D medium. Lighting a face so that it appears shadowless makes the face look flat and even sunken... to me, a very unflattering look. It is okay for lighting models, products and anything glamorous in an advertising sense, but for a news person doing an interview...nada. In this day and age of high-def tv... the on camera people need really good makeup and lighting that is soft, flattering and directed from above!

Another explanation of 3D in a 2D medium.... look at your computer programs and the "buttons" that we click on! When the button appears to be raised... the shadow is below and to one side of the button... when you mouse over it... the shadow switches to the top of the button and the other side... the button looks depressed or sunken below the screen surface!

Dave Speace
Producer/Director/DP
DZP Video

Windows 7, 64 Bit, i7 8 Core, 16Gb Ram, GeForce 4800


Return to posts index

Bob Cole
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Jan 12, 2011 at 4:49:57 pm

Thanks David, but I'm agreeing with you. That under-camera light from classic Hollywood films is a fill, not a key. Maybe I was wrong to compare it to the Couric floorlight, which does seem stronger. As I said, it's an effect that seems to work best with faces with great structure.

My goal is to keep the eyelight from overwhelming the three-dimensional effect of the properly-placed key. Dim it too much, and it stops putting that "twinkle" in the eye.


Return to posts index

David Speace
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Apr 2, 2011 at 4:14:26 pm

Dennis, I just wanted to mention that I heard that you will be doing the lighting for ABC's coverage of "the marriage of the century"! All I need is a little budget and we can do a behind the scenes video of the coverage for you...lol!

I was intending to put a picture up of the modification I did to the small LTM projector so I can mount it on a 500w Strand Bambino...for a lot more punch. I will be doing this soon. For many of the shoots I have been doing for WPHL17 in -- Better Philly and Phillies coverage, all seem to be run and gun shoots... very little lighting, maybe just a camera light for standup interviews...however, on Monday I am one of the shooters for 6ABC's "Best of Class" program and I will be doing interviews of these top high school seniors... and I will be lighting w LED lights, tungsten fresnels for back and background lighting w/gobos... I will take some pictures and post on this thread.

For those that are interested, this is the LED light I designed that I will be using...
http://cgi.ebay.com/Grip-LED-led-light-DZP-Video-/290551364698?pt=Camcorder...

Dave Speace
Producer/Director/DP
DZP Video

Windows 7, 64 Bit, i7 8 Core, 16Gb Ram, GeForce 4800


Return to posts index

Dennis Size
Re: Please recommend Light for lighting backgrounds during interviews
on Apr 2, 2011 at 5:42:57 pm

Yep..... unfortunately.
All I need is to have my budget elevated to the status of meager, and I could actually do something worthy of a Royal Wedding.
The studios I'll be doing in London won't be that much different from "run and gun".
Be sure to post your stills from "Best of Class". What kinds of gobos are you using?
Thanks
DS



Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]