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Vincent Becquiot
Back light arm
on Aug 4, 2007 at 4:46:50 pm

Hello all,

I am looking for either a long extention arm kit for one the many C stands I already have, or a good stand arm kit that could extend to 6-8 feet. This to support smallers fresnels.

I do own 3 stands with arm, but they are very flimsy (sad at $280 bucks a piece) and it just seems like they are always about to break appart.

Any advice appreciated.

Thanks,

Vince


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john sharaf
Re: Back light arm
on Aug 4, 2007 at 5:46:15 pm

Try the Mathews "Baby Boom Arm". I use them to hold either 400 or 800w Jokers with Chimeras attached. Of course for this weight you need strong stands like combos and to ballast with both a sandbag on the stand bottom and on the opposite end of the arm from the light unit. As with all boom arms, care should be taken to position arm over the lead leg of the stand.

JS



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Dennis Size
Re: Back light arm
on Aug 4, 2007 at 6:16:28 pm

Be advised, $280.00 is candy money when it comes to a proper grip stand and boom arm.
Do the job right and buy a Matthews Junior Stand with double rise.....or it's smaller counterpart the Hollywood Beefy Baby Double Rise, and with a Rocky Mountain Leg.
You should be using a Junior Boom (#427803) that reduces to 68" and extends to 10'0". You should also buy a "Drop Down" (#427805) to level off the fixture hanging from the boom.
Also purchase a 25pound sandbag to keep the base of your stand stable.
All can be found at MATTHEWS STUDIO EQUIPMENT (http://www.mpegrip.com).
DS
P.S. It always surprises me the risk shooters will take when it comes to the safety of the subjects sitting under their gear.


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Ken Zukin
Re: Back light arm
on Aug 4, 2007 at 9:18:35 pm

Ditto what Dennis and John have said about a sturdy stand.
I contacted American Grip in LA about duplicating a set up that I liked.
It is essentially a large Combo-type stand with a "lollipop" that is rigged to accept a C-stand as the extension arm. It works really well, and can easily support something along the lines of a Joker 400 fully extended (about 8 feet horizontal).


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Vincent Becquiot
Re: Back light arm
on Aug 5, 2007 at 2:50:30 am

Sounds like a winner, thanks guys.

Vince


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Bob Cole
leveling a filament
on Aug 6, 2007 at 4:14:02 pm

[Dennis Size] "You should also buy a "Drop Down" (#427805) to level off the fixture hanging from the boom."

I use a drop-down in part because I understand that filament orientation can be critical to its longevity.

But in a low-ceiling setting, the extra inches of clearance are pretty valuable real estate. I've occasionally put a small fresnel (e.g. Pepper 200) directly on the end of my mini-Math boom.

Any general guide on which filaments you should definitely run only in the proper level orientation?


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john sharaf
Re: leveling a filament
on Aug 6, 2007 at 4:19:35 pm

Bob,

The drop-down is necessitated by the fact that you'll need to aim the light! Often the boom arm is not level so pan and tilt would be limited.

JS


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Vincent Becquiot
Re: leveling a filament
on Aug 6, 2007 at 6:05:40 pm

Will the drop down fit on both the baby (7') and the junior boom?

Vince


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Bob Cole
Re: leveling a filament
on Aug 7, 2007 at 4:14:07 pm

[Vincent Becquiot] "Will the drop down fit on both the baby (7') and the junior boom?"

The drop down with which I'm familiar has a 5/8" socket which fits the mini-Matth boom. Not sure about the items you're talking about but I assume they all fit.


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Dennis Size
Re: leveling a filament
on Aug 7, 2007 at 1:37:55 am

The general "rule of thumb" for proper lamp life is that you should burn the filament no more than 45 degrees off it's horizontal axis.
Frankly I could care less about lamp life. I only suggested the drop down because it's safer, and allows you to properly pan and tilt the fixture since you're hanging it horizontal with gravity. A 200 watt Pepper doesn't have a lot of weight to it so you can tighten it enough to maintain it's position. It's much more difficult to hang a 1000w fresnel off the end of a boom arm and expect it's pan not to slip due to gravity.

DS


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