FORUMS: list search recent posts

Digital Video and Flourescent Lighting Help

COW Forums : Lighting Design

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Tartiartic
Digital Video and Flourescent Lighting Help
on May 3, 2007 at 7:17:31 pm

Thank you all for bearing with me if I have posted this in the wrong place. I am new, and a bad writer. Here are my problems.

I have interior shop training video to make. I have a new Canon DV-20 with 2 Tota lights at 500w with a 3200k color temperature, for lighting support. They have white umbrellas to diffuse the lighting. ( It does take out quite a bit of light but the ease of dealing with the umbrellas instead of ballooning the frost so it doesn't melt over rides that concern)

The predominate lighting in the shop are T-8 fluorescent. The question that we have is it easier to color correct the Tota Lights to match the florescent, or can we just gel the front of the camera? Also if we do gel to color correct which color should we get? A lee or Rosco number would be incredibly fantastic. Thank you for bearing with me. I appreciate any input.




Return to posts index

Rick Amundson
Re: Digital Video and Flourescent Lighting Help
on May 3, 2007 at 8:02:43 pm

First, you want to gel the lights. Putting a filter on the camera would effect both the tungsten and fluorescent lights. Your goal is to match the Tota lights to the existing fluorescents to get a similar color tempature through out the frame.

Second, not all fluorescent lights have the same color tempature so there is no single gel number to give you to correct the lights. T8 lights can go from 2700 to 6000 degrees. If you can, try to find the color temp of the fluorescents and we can come up with a gel pack to help. It will be some combination of Plus Green and CTB.

Anyone else have pre-determined gel packs for flos?

Rick Amundson
Producer/Director/DP
Screenscape Studios
Bravo Romeo Entertainment
http://www.screenscapestudios.com
http://www.bravoromeo.com
http://www.indeliblemovie.com


Return to posts index

Tartiartic
Re: Digital Video and Flourescent Lighting Help
on May 4, 2007 at 6:48:26 am

Thank you so much for your reply. I tried to tell my employer the same thing about the additive properties of the gel over the camera. Didn't quite believe me. Thank you for backing me up. I still have to work on the color temp of the flours. Have yet to track down a lamp box as well as they are really far up in the air. Again thank you for replying.



Return to posts index


Raymond Motion Pictures
Re: Digital Video and Flourescent Lighting Help
on May 4, 2007 at 3:54:44 pm

T-8's can be:

Cool White
Warm White
Day Light

Each with a particular color temp. With real differences.

Butchers learned that putting cool white lamps in their cases caused the meat to look grey and rotten. With warm white lamps, the meat looks red and fresh.

Each will require a different gel over an incandescent light to match and to color balance a camera. If the T8s are mixed - you've got problems.


Return to posts index

Raymond Motion Pictures
Re: Digital Video and Flourescent Lighting Help
on May 17, 2007 at 2:08:36 am

[Tartiartic] "A lee or Rosco number would be incredibly fantastic."

Assuming T8 Cool White (The most popular T8 lamp:

Rosco 3202 to balance to daylight
Rosco 3304 to balance to Cool White lamps overhead.

You will need both over the Tota's


Return to posts index

Michael Palmer
Re: Digital Video and Flourescent Lighting Help
on May 30, 2007 at 4:37:08 am

Never gel the front of the camera. You can use filters but not gel.

In side this shop are there any windows and any daylight to consider? Before you consider any color correction to your lights you need to consider the areas you can't correct and work to match that. And if there is are you shooting during twilight as the ambient daylight goes away? I would think the architect designed this room with lighting in mind and as others here have said there are many color temperatures of T-8's. However the maintenance man probably doesn't give a hoot to color and the room could be a mix.

In my opinion the Philips T-8 TL 900 series flos are the best film ready tubes on the market. I use the TL 950 for daylight and the TL 930 for tungsten balance in my package as a Hollywood Gaffer every day I work in film production. Together with the Advance (Philips) Mark 10 high freq dimmable ballasts they are incredible to work with. I have made my own units with Kino flo housings and have worked them for over the past 8-10 years.

If you need to color correct look at the big picture and see what you can't correct first, then correct to it. Balancing the camera to a custom setting can help too. I believe knowing what color temp you are working with is extremely important. If you don't have any daylight then changing the tubes to TL 930 (3000 Kelvin) and balance the camera to incandescent.
Good Luck
Michael Palmer



Return to posts index


Edwin Pieroelie
Re: Digital Video and Flourescent Lighting Help
on Oct 28, 2009 at 9:24:07 am

Greetings everyone, I know in other posts they call responding to a very old thread "raising the zombie" but i feel this fluorescent lighting topic is still very "hot" today.

My situation is unique in that I live (and work) in Jakarta, Indonesia and we don't always have access to all of the materials/products mentioned on the posts. Take for example my longing to engage in DIY fluorescent lighting. I have searched high and low for the following products but they are no where to be found. I even phoned the philips distributor here in Jakarta and they couldn't help me.
lighting: Philips T8 Tl 930 and 950, Optima 32, Optima 50.
support: Philips ADVANCE Mark 10 Ballast.

My question to the forum is: When I look for fluorescent lighting what do I look for? Is it enough for me to look on the box and see 3200k and know that this is good for inside? And look for 5500k for outside lighting?

What makes the Philips and Optima lights so special? I am sure there must be equivalents here in Jakarta but I don't know what specs I have to ask for! I know about the cool white, and the other "flavors" of fluorescent. Of course watts are important too.

Let me give you the following example of where I am right now.

I want to shoot green screen indoors on a AVG-HPX 172 EN Panasonic P2 (just bought it :-)) and for my key light i figure i need 1000w of light, do all i need to do is go to the store, find the fluorescent lights that are 3200k (let's say the cool white ones) , read the wattage (let's say it is 250) which means I buy 4 of them, put the package together and I am ready to go??

WHat other specs do I need to worry/know about? And here in Indonesia the ballasts available are just simple ones that go above your tiles on the roof beside the fluorescent lights ... is that the same as what I need? If you have the time, it would really be appreciated! I would be willing to send over free stock footage of Indonesia if you ever need it! As long as I don't have to pay to travel hahahaha but I would be happy to put it on DVD and pay for the regular postage to send it over to you. Kind of like a barter for assistance, video style.

Thanks in advance for all the help,

edwinp



Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]