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Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size

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Doug Hubbard
Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size
on Aug 12, 2015 at 5:43:16 pm

Hi Folks,

I've got some old archival video on DVD that I'm trying to bring into a 1080p 29.97 AVID project. It's all SD stuff, a 2 hour long event recording that was probably shot on VHS or Hi-8 originally and then burned to a DVD.

I've ripped it to an Mp4 in Handbrake using their High Profile setting, which results in about a 1.5GB file, which is fine. However when I AMA link it into AVID and try to transcode to our proxy editing format (DNX 45), AVID is telling me it will create a 47GB file. That just seems wrong to me.

Any ideas on how to bring this material in with a smaller footprint? There could be quite a few of these we'll need to ingest in the future.

Thanks very much for your time.


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Michael Phillips
Re: Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size
on Aug 12, 2015 at 5:49:02 pm

You are seeing the difference between LongGOP encoding and I frame encoding used by DNxHD, ProRes, etc. LongGOP can maintain reasonable quality at very low data/storage rates, whereas I frame encoding cannot. You can try transcoding to one of the XDCAM codecs if you want, which is LongGOP albeit at a different data rate. SD DVD was most likely in the 8-12MB/s MPEG2 range whereas XDCAM HD will be 35 MBs. Then you are converting that to H.264 which can go even lower, or let's assume the same data rate. In NTSC 23.976P, JFIF encoding at 14:1 was roughly 12MBs. HD will require more, just do to size.



Michael


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Shane Ross
Re: Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size
on Aug 12, 2015 at 5:52:39 pm

The format that handbrake rips is highly compressed. The formats Avid uses are for broadcast work...so the quality is higher.

If you want it at full quality...that's the setting you'd use, or an even higher setting. If you want offline quality...very low res, then use 14:1 or DV...import as SD. And then when you lock, only convert the portions you need.

BUT....the danger with doing this is that there's absolutely no timecode reference...so you'll be overcutting manually...by eye. You'll even be manually searching the QT file for the pieces you want, and then converting only those bits...and then eye matching. That'll be a lot of work.

So...is it best to bring in the full quality version, and that'll be the master? Or best to spend lots of man hours dealing with the online? Storage is cheaper than man hours, in this case...I'd wager.

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Doug Hubbard
Re: Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size
on Aug 12, 2015 at 6:38:47 pm
Last Edited By Doug Hubbard on Aug 12, 2015 at 6:50:05 pm

Here's a crazy notion. Could I just cut with the AMA media? Bypass transcoding entirely? The editor will probably use a total of 30 seconds of this stuff from across 4 or 5 DVDs, so it seems so wasteful to bring in 10 hours and 500GB worth of DVD just for that.

It would be the only AMA media in the cut, but it's small enough and these machines are fast enough that maybe it would be alright?

Edit: I should add that picture quality is gonna be low regardless. This stuff looks like old, poorly lit VHS footage. So "quality" is a relative term here.


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Shane Ross
Re: Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size
on Aug 12, 2015 at 9:00:59 pm

[Doug Hubbard] "Could I just cut with the AMA media? Bypass transcoding entirely?"

If you like very slow response times and crashing...sure. Don't do it. That media is HIGHLY compressed, and Avid doesn't edit highly compressed media well. Premiere will...if you throw a lot of RAM, fast Processors and a CUDA card at it. Avid...it's speed comes from making it into an editable codec.

[Doug Hubbard] "The editor will probably use a total of 30 seconds of this stuff from across 4 or 5 DVDs, so it seems so wasteful to bring in 10 hours and 500GB worth of DVD just for that."

Perhaps they can look at the footage you AMA...make subclips and trancode only what they need.

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Doug Hubbard
Re: Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size
on Aug 12, 2015 at 10:09:23 pm

[Shane Ross] "Perhaps they can look at the footage you AMA...make subclips and trancode only what they need."

That definitely seems like the better solution. Do some refinement before we transcode. You're right, we've already seen some slowdowns thanks to the AMA footage and usually I avoid cutting AMA like the plague. Appreciate all your input!


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Stacy Lincoln
Re: Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size
on Aug 12, 2015 at 10:28:05 pm

Perhaps this is silly me...but I wouldn't transcode any of it. I would simply ingest like a tape. When you're in "Capture" mode, Click off timecode, play the DVD and ingest manually like it was coming in from tape. It will capture the DVD in real time. You can actually just grab the portion off of the DVD that you need. OR use an application like Wonder Share. It's about $40. You can rip any portion of a DVD with this simply by moving the "handles" and grabbing a section. Then export that as a Quicktime. Viola...you have a small clip and you can import it.


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Shane Ross
Re: Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size
on Aug 12, 2015 at 10:48:56 pm

For that you'd need capture hardware. A lot of people don't have IO on their Avid systems...

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Nick Griffin
Re: Bringing DVD into AVID results in huge file size
on Aug 17, 2015 at 7:14:15 pm

I'm with Stacy on using Wondershare. Once a year we edit a video competition and nearly everything comes in on DVD (SD DVD no less). We'd be lost without Wondershare for that project.


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