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Setting Clip Duration in Source Window by keyboard.

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Adam Berch
Setting Clip Duration in Source Window by keyboard.
on Jun 22, 2013 at 11:06:44 pm

Hi,

I have a gradient background that I know I want to use for 5 seconds for title.

I Made it in Avid Title Tool and it's now in my Source window.

I put an in point and then I move my playhead to the 5 second point and mark my out point. That works. But, is there a way to mark an in point then type the amount of seconds I want the clip to be without having to move the playhead down?

Thanks in advance


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Michael Phillips
Re: Setting Clip Duration in Source Window by keyboard.
on Jun 22, 2013 at 11:40:15 pm

On the keypad, after you mark-in, enter +5:00, enter.

Michael


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Scott Cole
Re: Setting Clip Duration in Source Window by keyboard.
on Jun 23, 2013 at 1:56:17 pm

Unfortunately, as Avid, and most other non-linear edit systems as well, use "Inclusive Outs" when you go forward 5 seconds and mark an out point, you will wind up with a duration of 5 seconds and 1 frame. You have two options if you want an exact 5 second clip; either type in 4:29, "enter" and "mark out," or type 5:00 "enter" then "1" which will move you back a frame and then "mark out."

M. Scott Cole
Senior Post Production Editor
60 MINUTES
CBS News, NYC
sc6@cbsnews.com
mscottc@comcast.net


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Michael Phillips
Re: Setting Clip Duration in Source Window by keyboard.
on Jun 23, 2013 at 2:06:07 pm

Quick correction; after you enter +5:00/enter, it is a -1/enter to go back one frame.

Avid, having been developed in 1987, used the EDL specification for IN/OUT where the OUT is +1. Has always stayed that way. Sometimes referred to as INSIDE/OUTSIDE counts (in film speak) whereas film folks always worked INSIDE/INSIDE.


Michael


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Scott Cole
Re: Setting Clip Duration in Source Window by keyboard.
on Jun 23, 2013 at 7:19:57 pm

That comes from the thought process developed by just about anything involved in linear video editing where the "out point" of the current edit on your record machine is the "in point" of the next edit. The way I've often explained it to folks is "you are out of your edit by this frame." This is often called "Exclusive Out." On any EDL (Edit Decision List for you newcomers), you could literally scroll down the list and check that the outpoint of your current edit was the same as the inpoint of your next edit, and that's one of the things you checked to make sure you had a "clean EDL."

The non-linear model of editing is the same as a film editor's model, where the "out point" is the last frame you see in your clip, and it is included in the edit, hence the term "Inclusive Out."

I've seen this issue trip up people in both directions.

M. Scott Cole
Senior Post Production Editor
60 MINUTES
CBS News, NYC
sc6@cbsnews.com
mscottc@comcast.net


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