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Windows 10 - Here we go

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Chris Pettit
Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 12:59:42 am

When Adobe started this crazy ride, my friend Charles Reilly made a video about why the move by Adobe to mandatory subscriptions was such a ominous development. Among many reasons was his questions about where it might lead us if the other software giants follow suit, as they were certainly hoping to do. He included a suggestion that we might eventually see OS "subscriptions". He was criticized quite a bit for suggesting such an Orwellian future. I agreed with his concerns then and still do.

Windows 10 is coming soon, and Microsoft is obviously struggling with some of the same issues of software maturity that Adobe has been. And they appear to have the same thinking. Rent our "service". Overnight they're not a software company anymore, they're a "service". Trust us. We'll deliver lots of cool stuff (in spite of the disaster that is Windows 8). Right away without waiting for major upgrades. Of course Windows 10 will still require downloading, installing and operating on a local machine. But trust us, it'll be great for customers. Choice cuts from their blog from 2 days ago:

"Delivering Windows as a Service and a Free Upgrade to Windows 10

Today was a monumental day for us on the Windows team because we shared our desire to redefine the relationship we have with you – our customers. We announced that a free upgrade for Windows 10 will be made available to customers running Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Windows Phone 8.1 who upgrade in the first year after launch.*

This is more than a one-time upgrade: once a Windows device is upgraded to Windows 10, we will continue to keep it current for the supported lifetime of the device – at no cost. With Windows 10, the experience will evolve and get even better over time. We’ll deliver new features when they’re ready, not waiting for the next major release. We think of Windows as a Service – in fact, one could reasonably think of Windows in the next couple of years as one of the largest Internet services on the planet."


Sound familiar? And then there's this gem:

"And just like any Internet service, the idea of asking “What version are you on?” will cease to make sense – which is great news for our Windows developers. With universal Windows apps that work across the entire device family, developers can build one app that targets the broadest range of devices – including the PC, tablet, phone, Xbox, the Internet of Things, and more."

How long do you think it'll be before they say, "hey, did we actually promise you there wouldn't be multiple versions required?" And "we didn't say it would be free forever..."

History repeats itself.

http://blogs.windows.com/bloggingwindows/2015/01/21/the-next-generation-of-...


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Mads Nybo Jørgensen
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 7:01:37 am

Hey Chris,

[Chris Pettit] "Rent our "service". Overnight they're not a software company anymore, they're a "service". Trust us. We'll deliver lots of cool stuff (in spite of the disaster that is Windows 8)."

I know that I am one of the very few happy Windows 8 users on this planet (now on 8.1). I am also loving my Office 365 and Onedrive - although Skype has turned into a piece of junk designed to make it difficult to make calls and destroy computers...

However: Windows 10 will be FREE to users that has Windows 7 onwards installed. So you can't really be complaining about a free product, can you?

Why is it free? Because it will, like iTunes is for Apple, be a Window where Microsoft can offer you other products and services through - let's face it, they got to earn their crust somehow and with Google giving their stuff away for free (in return for your data and pushing advertising to you) then it is difficult to knock it.

All the Best
Mads

@madsvid, London, UK
Check out my other hangouts:
Twitter: @madsvid
http://mads-thinkingoutloud.blogspot.co.uk


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Tim Wilson
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 7:41:03 am

[Mads Nybo Jørgensen] "I know that I am one of the very few happy Windows 8 users on this planet (now on 8.1). I am also loving my Office 365 and Onedrive - although Skype has turned into a piece of junk"

Yeah, what the hell happened to Skype? It used to be one of my most-used pieces of software. Now I dread it.

But I think that Windows 8 hate is overstated. Hate articles make fine clickbait, but I'm a fan too. Not only less disruptive than the transition from Mac OS 9 to Mac OS X, but FAR less disruptive than the switch from Apple System 6 to System 7. What a disaster. Whenever people pointed to the otherwise unprecedented mess of the early days of OS X through 10.3 or 4 or so (requiring Rosetta to literally translate the increasingly shaky relationships between Apple and third parties), Steve-o pointed back to THAT cluster-dork, which of course happened while he was in exile. And certainly neither of those was even vaguely disruptive as when Apple overthrew the Mac II platform that was the most popular in the land, in favor of the entirely incompatible Mac platform that has yet to crawl out of double digits of adoption. Historically speaking, nobody has torched its user based more, or more often, than Apple.

(For the record, I did indeed board the Apple II platform in 1979, before buying a Mac in February of 1984. There are a few of us left, but we're dying fast. LOL)

The place that Microsoft trips up, and which Apple gets exactly right, is that MSFT wants people to get the latest version of Windows, even on machines that are incapable of running it. This happened with Vista to such an extent that MSFT had to publish a matrix of which Vista features would be enabled on your computer, based on a "Can I Run Vista?" utility that most people ignored...and then complained about what a miserable experience it offered, when they should have never loaded it in the first place.

And on a new computer, Vista was a pleasure. And on a new computer, I find Windows 8 to be a PLEASURE.

That's my biggest concern about the constant updates model, though, which I know Jim in particular has been very articulate about here. We haven't heard the public W10 roll-out yet, but I'm going to be paying particular attention to the ability (or not) to freeze a W10 system in a stable state, ie, decline "upgrades" forever and ever, so that the OS isn't "upgraded" to a state that a) moves past the ability of installed application software to keep running without forcing those applications to be upgraded, and b) "upgraded" to a state that will only work properly with a new machine.

I would hope that all of this could be decoupled, since MSFT isn't actually in the business of forcing people to buy new computers to run the newest software, which Apple most certainly is. I don't mind when Apple does it, though, because that's the deal you strike at the outset. Want to run the newest version of our stuff? Then buy the newest computer, or be aware that you're no more than a year or two away from a fork in the road that can ONLY be resolved with a new computer, thank you and good night.



[Mads Nybo Jørgensen] "Microsoft can offer you other products and services through - let's face it, they got to earn their crust somehow"

Sad but true, but MSFT actually has some nice hardware. It's just not gonna do 'em a lot of good.

Surface is a lot of fun, even if nowhere the laptop replacement MSFT claims, and some of the Windows phones are a gas. Any Mac user will feel immediately at home with one of them, because it's actually a nifty mobile OS....although honestly, the only mobile OS that matters is the apps, where MSFT is still deficient, so no deal.

But the fit and finish of the HTC One M8 in particular is second to nobody imo, not even Apple, albeit in need of an update. (The M9 has been leaked, but not officially announced as far as I can tell.) But it's not like MSFT actually makes ANY of these phones, right?

The real MSFT hardware of note is the X-box, though. And mice. Dang, nobody makes mice like Microsoft. LOL

Neither of which will get a boost from W10 of course.

I don't envy them. They do an awful lot of things right, but it feels less than the sum of its parts. If "sexy" was easy, everyone would be sexy, right?


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David Lawrence
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 10:39:44 pm

[Tim Wilson] "(For the record, I did indeed board the Apple II platform in 1979, before buying a Mac in February of 1984. There are a few of us left, but we're dying fast. LOL)"

Hey Tim, my Apple //e still runs all its software and works as well as it did in 1980 when I bought it! ;)

_______________________
David Lawrence
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Jim Wiseman
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 25, 2015 at 5:09:23 am
Last Edited By Jim Wiseman on Jan 25, 2015 at 5:33:32 am

Following up on David's IIe comment, almost all of the Macs I have ever bought still work with the contemporary software installed on them. My IIe's ( I have a hardware based video synthesizer we manufactured that runs on it), 840AV, 9500, 9600, 2 950's (Media Composer 1000 from when I was the Hawaii Avid dealer), G3's, G4's, iMac's (at the place I do media work), G5 Mac Pro, early Powerbooks, 5 MacBook Pros, Mac Pro 2012, and a Mac Pro 2013 Tube (my current go to systems). I have run every operating system ever released on a Mac and had almost no problems. As an Avid and Media 100 dealer, I sold around 150 of what were the highest end Macs in the 1990's into the early 2000's. Very few problems with any of them or any of the OS's.

When FCP Legacy dried up the market for Avids, at least here in Hawaii, I tried selling the Play Trinity which was Windows 2000 based. The Trinity had it's own problems, but most of the headaches were from the OS, which I understand was better than any of the exclusively MS developed ones at the time. I had more problems, usually OS related, with those 8 systems than all of the approximately 150 Mac based systems I sold and supported. Left me with a rather bad taste in my mouth for MS, and admit it may have permanently biased me.

I survived Mac OS 6 to 7 to 8 to 9 to 10 with very few incidents. If you can't tell, I'm rather sold on Mac OS and knew enough about each one to make the transition from one to the next without problems supporting rather high performance software. Really wouldn't consider Windows for my personal use, although many seem to like it. I'm just not one of them and kind of get tired of the negative attitude towards Apple and Mac OS.

To get back on topic, although the Macs are not, OSX is free. No chance of it going to rental or subscription.

Jim Wiseman
Sony PMW-EX1, Pana AJ-D810 DVCPro, DVX-100, Nikon D7000, Final Cut Pro X 10.1.4, Final Cut Studio 2 and 3, Media 100 Suite 2.1.5, Premiere Pro CS 5.5 and 6.0, AJA ioHD, AJA Kona LHi, Blackmagic Ultrastudio 4K, Blackmagic Teranex, Avid MC, 2013 Mac Pro Hexacore, 1 TB SSD, 64GB RAM, 2-D500: 2012 Hexacore MacPro 3.33 Ghz 24Gb RAM GTX-285 120GB SSD, Macbook Pro 17" 2011 2.2 Ghz Quadcore i7 16GB RAM 250GB SSD


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Chris Pettit
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 2:57:11 pm
Last Edited By Chris Pettit on Jan 24, 2015 at 3:02:42 pm

[Mads Nybo Jørgensen] "However: Windows 10 will be FREE to users that has Windows 7 onwards installed. So you can't really be complaining about a free product, can you?

Why is it free? Because it will, like iTunes is for Apple, be a Window where Microsoft can offer you other products and services through - let's face it, they got to earn their crust somehow and with Google giving their stuff away for free (in return for your data and pushing advertising to you) then it is difficult to knock it."


Yes, I believe I can, for various reasons. First it wont be free for long, the offer is only for the first year, after which I'm quite sure it's their intention to move to subscriptions. That's why they're pushing this "redefine our relationship" and "Windows as a Service" (Maybe it's acronym should now be WAS?)language in their release. And its only for the life of the supported device. "Clever" is just one of the words that come to mind when I ponder this approach. They are well aware of the Adobe backlash and are trying to slide SLOOOOWWWLY into being a subscription based "service". Maybe ultimately you're comparison to iTunes will turn out to be true and the OS will remain free, but there is no reason to assume that know, they put a 1 year limit on their offer.

I'm respectful that you and Tim found 8 useful. But there are lots of reasons why almost everyone I know stayed away from 8, including the elimination of start menu (which MS is bringing back now because there was such and uproar), ergonomic dyslexia because it was more like a smart phone interface than a desktop. But first and foremost was the fact that 8 seemed to a lot of people more like a vehicle to sell you additional Microsoft stuff rather than a serious desktop type OS. My S4 Smart phone is constantly trying to sell me stuff, I certainly don't want my desktop to do it as well.

I agree totally that MS and Adobe are at a crossroads when it comes to monetizing their offerings in the future, and Google / Android aren't helping. But thats why innovative companies find new products and services to explore, develop and delight their customers with, not just declaring themselves to be "services".

Look at Black Magic. I bought a lot of their capture cards over the years, but now everyone simply copying files from cards now so I dont buy them anymore. So they make cool cameras and software now as well. They adapted. In my own business, years ago interactive CD-ROMS were the majority of my business, but I adapted to changing circumstances and now more of my business is motion graphics, animation and touchscreen app development.

Microsoft in in real danger of simply running out of ideas, so instead of focusing entirely on innovative new products, they're focus seems to be on new ways to SELL their products.

Same as Adobe, this is not customer or market driven IMO, it money and stock price driven. Frankly it seems lazy to me.

EDIT: Tim's post just reminded me about our experience with Surfaces. Agreed Tim, fantastic product, innovative answer to the limiations of the iPad. On our recommendation, we have a client that purchased 4 for touchscreen use at shows. Developing apps for them is wonderfully efficient, cost effective and functional. It was so successful that some of the other shows are investing in converting thier existing interfaces to the Surface for the smaller footprint they get.

The Surface is a great example of the opposite of my previous observations


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Mads Nybo Jørgensen
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 3:15:17 pm

Hey Chris,

Honestly - I think you are on a bit of rant with that last post. Not sure where all that pent up anger is coming from...?

[Chris Pettit] "First it wont be free for long, the offer is only for the first year, after which I'm quite sure it's their intention to move to subscriptions."

That is currently just speculation. And if you wish to make comparisons, there are IMHO a lot more choice when it comes to (good and cheap) operating systems at Windows oS level, than when it comes to Adobe's packages. And even then, if Microsoft did charge, so what - I'm getting my next one for free, so I have no reason to complain. I am already subscribing to Office 365 which is a great package at a lower cost than the full version. Only DOG in that house is SKYPE, for which that specific development & marketing team should be ashamed of themselves - it is currently far worse than anything that Microsoft have done in recent history.

[Chris Pettit] "Look at Black Magic. I bought a lot of their capture cards over the years, but now everyone simply copying files from cards now so I dont buy them anymore. So they make cool cameras and software now as well. They adapted."

All respect to Black Magic, but in the early days when running tests on one of their HD cards it would give out 10,000+ errors an hour (I recall one test showing 48,000 of them) - just couldn't trust them then for high-end work. However, that was early days and they certainly seems to have turned the boat and I often take time to research and consider their products.

Nevertheless, like BlackMagic; Adobe and Microsoft have had to adapt too - from where I am sitting, it seems like some of their users does not want to engage with this new colorful world of monthly subscriptions and cloud computing, and would rather be left behind on the train-platform - preferably on U-Matic NTSC 4:3 ;-)

Bottom line about Windows 10 - the BIG battle is on mobile devices and delivering apps and content. If you can't do that, you don't have a business in OS - Microsoft is acutely aware of what their competitors are doing, and since they can't deliver the buzz surrounding the iPhone, the natural conclusion would be for them to take on Android - which is free.

All the Best
Mads

@madsvid, London, UK
Check out my other hangouts:
Twitter: @madsvid
http://mads-thinkingoutloud.blogspot.co.uk


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Chris Pettit
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 3:25:42 pm

[Mads Nybo Jørgensen] "Honestly - I think you are on a bit of rant with that last post. Not sure where all that pent up anger is coming from...?"

I'm certainly not trying to come off mad, what part specifically seems to be a "rant" to you?

The word rant itself can be pretty dismissive don't you think?


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Mads Nybo Jørgensen
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 3:39:40 pm

[Chris Pettit] "The word rant itself can be pretty dismissive don't you think?"

I agree, it can be.

But then again, you sound upset that Microsoft may or may not follow the route of Adobe. If all of their competitors are doing the same and the customer base are gyrating towards freemium models, what would you do in their shoes?

All the Best
Mads

@madsvid, London, UK
Check out my other hangouts:
Twitter: @madsvid
http://mads-thinkingoutloud.blogspot.co.uk


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Chris Pettit
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 4:15:24 pm

[Mads Nybo Jørgensen] "I agree, it can be.

But then again, you sound upset that Microsoft may or may not follow the route of Adobe. If all of their competitors are doing the same and the customer base are gyrating towards freemium models, what would you do in their shoes?"


Mads, I think the words we choose when we characterize other peoples positions are important. Personally I avoid describing someone else as "upset" because I happen to disagree with their conclusions, but thats just me.

But to answer your question, I think they should focus on producing an operating system that people will pay for because it's superior. Window 7 PRO is an outstanding OS. Keep going I say, make me a better one Microsoft. Again while acknowledging your liking of 8, the fact is it was a spectacular failure in terms of adoption, mostly because they are CONSTANTLY trying to play catchup with Apple and Google instead of playing to their strengths. This doesnt in any way preclude them from heading off in entirely new directions simulaneously (XBOX, Surface Pro)


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Mads Nybo Jørgensen
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 7:05:44 pm
Last Edited By Mads Nybo Jørgensen on Jan 24, 2015 at 9:04:35 pm

[Chris Pettit] "Mads, I think the words we choose when we characterize other peoples positions are important. Personally I avoid describing someone else as "upset" because I happen to disagree with their conclusions, but thats just me."

I agree about the use of words. But I also think that one theme that keeps on recurring on this forum is the attribution of actual words to people. I've checked, and I did not use the word "upset" - so on that point we do disagree. My original statement about the rant was purely based on how I perceived your post at the time of reading it - I can only apologize for you feeling hurt by that, and I hope that you accept that apology.

CORRECTION:
I did use the word "upset" in my second reply - let that one slip by. So you get a second apology for that too. My bad :-)

But, I do not understand how one can attribute "They adapted" to Black Magic and oneself in the example of "interactive CD-ROMS", but not to the business of Microsoft and Adobe?

It just seems like there are one rule for some, and not for others in order to suit an opinion of keeping status quo in certain circumstances, rather than one of progression?

All the Best
Mads

@madsvid, London, UK
Check out my other hangouts:
Twitter: @madsvid
http://mads-thinkingoutloud.blogspot.co.uk


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 7:37:38 pm

[Chris Pettit] "Look at Black Magic. I bought a lot of their capture cards over the years, but now everyone simply copying files from cards now so I dont buy them anymore. So they make cool cameras and software now as well. They adapted."

I share the same concerns as Walter Soyka about the long term viability of the 'software as a freebie' business model. Is BM buying up established players and then giving them away for peanuts (while tying them to BM hardware of course) really that great of a solution? The jury is still out on whether or not BM can develop great software in house.

Getting into cameras was certain a heads up move as, like you said, the I/O card market is shrinking, but unfortunately their cameras are plagued with problems and many times new cameras are announced (and even released) before the previous gen cameras are fixed. Not exactly confidence instilling.

At least with SaaS it gives software makers the ability to make money at a time when a race-to-the-bottom seems to be spinning up.


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Gustavo Bermudas
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 8:52:45 pm

The idea of Windows becoming subscription is so utopian...I can't imagine the average user that only uses it for checking emails and watching videos that they'll go for it. If that happens Apple will grow even further, what extra features they need?

As for Blackmagic, I think their association with the prosumer label is getting stronger, many professional colorists are looking away from Resolve and try to adopt a toolset that's not as popular and accesible, mostly to avoid client interaction with their project files.


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Steve Connor
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 9:40:55 pm

[Gustavo Bermudas] "As for Blackmagic, I think their association with the prosumer label is getting stronger, many professional colorists are looking away from Resolve and try to adopt a toolset that's not as popular and accesible, mostly to avoid client interaction with their project files."

Really? Can't believe that's happening. "prosumer"? obviously the soccer moms who are using FCPX are then grading their soccer game footage in Resolve!


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Gustavo Bermudas
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 25, 2015 at 9:22:13 pm

[Steve Connor] "Really? Can't believe that's happening. "prosumer"? obviously the soccer moms who are using FCPX are then grading their soccer game footage in Resolve!"

Oh, so now anyone who can afford a crappy $3K camera and play to be a director is a pro now?


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Steve Connor
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 25, 2015 at 10:17:50 pm

[Gustavo Bermudas] "Oh, so now anyone who can afford a crappy $3K camera and play to be a director is a pro now?
"


No-one said that and the BMD Camera is NOT "crappy" there is some amazing work being done with all their cameras.


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Gustavo Bermudas
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 25, 2015 at 10:45:16 pm

[Steve Connor] "[Gustavo Bermudas] "Oh, so now anyone who can afford a crappy $3K camera and play to be a director is a pro now?
"

No-one said that and the BMD Camera is NOT "crappy" there is some amazing work being done with all their cameras."


Didn't mention brands in my last post, that was you


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Steve Connor
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 25, 2015 at 10:47:44 pm

[Gustavo Bermudas] "Didn't mention brands in my last post, that was you
"


Fair enough, I assumed incorrectly


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Mark McKee
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Apr 21, 2015 at 7:39:40 pm

Actually, you're over by a factor of 10. That can all happen with a $300 Vixia camera. At least in the Windows world, which allows the use of the "dreaded" AVCHD or ".mts" format. You just drag it in and start editing. Very "elegant and intuitive". Of course, you need to be able to "think outside the box". It really is bizarro world these days...


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Ricardo Marty
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Apr 21, 2015 at 9:03:44 pm

wonder if cs6 will run in win-x.? i wont be upgrading at least for a year till i know for shure. maybe it will cripple the os so tha if you need power for any creative job you would need to pay and after it goes back to a simple plain old internet browsing word procesing,photo viewing system.

however i do like the fact that it can be insatalled in an androude device giving it dual boot capabilities.

ricardo marty


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Steve Connor
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 9:36:49 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "Getting into cameras was certain a heads up move as, like you said, the I/O card market is shrinking, but unfortunately their cameras are plagued with problems and many times new cameras are announced (and even released) before the previous gen cameras are fixed. Not exactly confidence instilling.
"


At the start maybe, but they have slowed the release of new models to concentrate on getting things right. RED didn't do a lot better when they first started.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 10:47:01 pm

[Steve Connor] "RED didn't do a lot better when they first started."

Red came around for sure, but I think people forget just how incredibly difficult they were to use at first.

And as others have pointed out on threads in The Other Forum, Red may very well be the second-most popular camera for making YouTube videos, right behind the Phantom. Conceivably in third place with GoPro at the top...but seriously, take a look around. It's not that far from a prosumer camera for an awful lot of applications.

(Although obviously not even vaguely so for many of its applications.)


[Andrew Kimery] "The jury is still out on whether or not BM can develop great software in house."

The progress in Resolve is nothing short of miraculous.

Did you see that dog before BMD bought it? Powerful, yes, but a DOG. They not only cleaned it up and made it insanely more powerful, they unleashed it on Mac and Windows for the first time in incredibly short order, while also optimizing for modern GPUs and standalone hardware.

Their development work was both more extensive and far faster than anything Apple did over the entire life of Legend. Certainly obliterates anything they did with Color.

Not to say that Resolve is your cup of tea, or has progressed far enough to meet your standards. Maybe not. But no kidding, their development record on this alone is spectacular.

Also don't forget that much of their hardware has coded firmware, and not just the cameras. They developed that from scratch. They've also developed a number of bits of monitoring software and capture utilities that, while very modestly scaled, are rock solid.

In the case of Fusion, of course, the relevant case is Resolve, a test I think they're passing with flying colors so far. I suspect the code base for Fusion is a lot cleaner -- it's more modern, has been more aggressively developed over its life cycle to date, hasn't had the burden of legacy hardware and formats holding it back, etc -- so it's conceivable to me that BMD actually has a simpler task this time. And to help, eyeon's visionary founder is part of the team. This is as close to a slam dunk as you'll see.

However, I continue to believe that most people will be seriously, seriously put off by node compositing. If it was the best way to work for most people, most people would have figured out a way to work that way by now. If developers had the barest hint that this was technology for the masses, they'd have gone pedal to the metal to reach for the big bag of money.

But it's not for everyone. It's not for most people. It's not even for a meaningfully sized slice of the "most people" pie. Advantages galore for some workflows, etc etc etc, but outside those specific workflows, it's just not. So it will be almost exponentially harder for most people to evaluate BMD's success in adapting it, because it won't be appropriate to their work, and more important, it just won't be fun.

Of course, some people might have said the same thing about color grading, but I think that that was really just one molecular orbit out from the color correction that most people were doing in their NLE....unless they were doing it in After Effects. Resolve absolutely moved the needle for NLE-ers wanting to take grading more seriously, but what's the extent to which it moved people out of AE? Walter, you surely have a better sense of that than me.

But I really, really, really can't envision Fusion moving anyone at all out of AE in a meaningful way. A nice complement for some tasks perhaps, but Fusion is a niche-y tool that I think ties directly to Grant's overall strategy of doing what interests him, without worrying much about the market opportunities for it. LOL It's been working for him so far. And kidding aside, it makes a great complement to a lot of other things that BMD is up to, especially with Resolve and the cameras.


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 11:23:27 pm

[Tim Wilson] "The progress in Resolve is nothing short of miraculous.

Did you see that dog before BMD bought it? Powerful, yes, but a DOG. They not only cleaned it up and made it insanely more powerful, they unleashed it on Mac and Windows for the first time in incredibly short order, while also optimizing for modern GPUs and standalone hardware."


I should have expanded on this point more. BM's MO right now is to buy very good, existing software and use that as a launch pad for future development. My question is, can BM create very good software in house and still give it away for peanuts?

Chris' dystopian future is all software is SaaS and perpetual licenses are a thing of the past. My dystopian future is that stand alone software no long is a viable business so the only companies left are hardware companies that give software away for peanuts in order to get people to buy their hardware. When there's no one left to buy can BM make topflight software from the ground up in house? While fun for users in the short term, is BM's model good for the long term health of the industry?

Avid no longer locking users into Avid-brand I/O devices was great a great step forward and I really don't want to go back to a time where hardware locks out software from competing companies. I'm already annoyed that BM blocks Resolve from seeing non-BM I/O devices.


"Certainly obliterates anything they did with Color."

I don't even know why bothered releasing Color. After the initial release all Color got were basically bug fixes. Released as version 1.0, killed at version 1.5. When the last FC Studio suite came out and I saw that Color didn't even make it to version 2 I knew the app was toast.


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David Mathis
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 11:39:16 pm

Tim,

I agree with you, all the way, that Fusion is not for everyone. Then again, nodes are fun to play with. ;-)


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 10:58:43 pm

[Steve Connor] "At the start maybe, but they have slowed the release of new models to concentrate on getting things right. RED didn't do a lot better when they first started."

The RED One was certainly in public beta for a good while, but BM has released five different cameras since NAB 2012 (Cinema, Production, Pocket, Studio and Ursa). If they don't announce a new camera at NAB this year then that might be a sign they've slowed down, but it's been pedal to the metal so far.


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Steve Connor
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 25, 2015 at 12:22:21 am

[Andrew Kimery] "The RED One was certainly in public beta for a good while, but BM has released five different cameras since NAB 2012 (Cinema, Production, Pocket, Studio and Ursa). If they don't announce a new camera at NAB this year then that might be a sign they've slowed down, but it's been pedal to the metal so far.
"


They're not exactly 5 different cameras, in terms of the stuff that matters it's more like 3 at most :)


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 25, 2015 at 5:29:25 am

[Steve Connor] "They're not exactly 5 different cameras, in terms of the stuff that matters it's more like 3 at most :)"

I say 5 you say 3... how about 4? I think 4 is a good compromise. lol


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Chris Pettit
Re: Windows 10 - Here we go
on Jan 24, 2015 at 11:57:59 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "I share the same concerns as Walter Soyka about the long term viability of the 'software as a freebie' business model. Is BM buying up established players and then giving them away for peanuts (while tying them to BM hardware of course) really that great of a solution? The jury is still out on whether or not BM can develop great software in house."

I agree basically. I wasn't endorsing all thier products per se (I dont own thier cameras etc). My only point was that they are adapting to changing market forces like the rest of us.


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