FORUMS: list search recent posts

DIY vs. Turnkey...

COW Forums : Videoguys.com Tech Talk

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
brownalan
DIY vs. Turnkey...
on Mar 30, 2004 at 4:27:38 am

If I bought all the bits myself and based it on Jon's $1000 budget dream system (http://www.videoguys.com/DIY.html) how much would I expect to save over simply having a company build it for me?

I have a hankering to do it myself, but not a deep pull toward it, and all things being equal, I'd probably rather have the piece of mind of having it done right.

So I'm interested in what the savings would be by building myself. I've heard they're pretty minimal.

Also, I'd be interested in hearing how others in my position who opted for the DIY approach, now feel about that decision.

Thanks for your help and for this great site...

alan


Return to posts index

Michael P
Re: DIY vs. Turnkey...
on Mar 30, 2004 at 7:04:35 am

Personally i prefer DIY computers. The last 2 computers that have entered my house are actually Custom Made. There are a few reasons why i prefer custom.

1. You can search around for the Cheapest Prices. If you go and configure a computer elsewhere, you get RIPPED OFF on necessary parts. Like Dell, Gateway, Alienware, All 3 of those companies charge double or triple prices for comparable/worse quality RAM, than that you can find via Pricewatch.

2. You get the most for your money. If you buy a Prebuilt, especially Turnkey systems, there is less expandability on what type of Accessories/Upgrades are possible. If you build your own, you get to choose EVERY aspect of what devices you buy(if you are a concious computer user). Instead of paying the company 20 dollars for the 56k modem, just dont get one, and dont get a lan card when you have Onboard, unless the lan chipset gets bad reviews. It is quite easy (after some research) to determine what is necessary/the most compatible for your system.

3. You don't have to pay extra for Tech Support. While having a Full System Warranty makes it easy to get specific help, I have actually found that i have never used Technical Support ever since i switched over from pre-built. With pre-built computers (depending on the manufacturer), most of the time you get software installed from the company (compaq, HP, DELL, and IBM are notorious for this) that is extra and just adds more room for error. I would prefer to start out with a Clear format and be forced to install all my software over again, than have HP or Compaq load it, along with Extra un needed software.

4. Though a Turnkey system is a "workstation", it is still a personal computer. I can't really feel that it is a personal computer when thousands if not millions of people around the world can have the EXACT SAME setup as me! I prefer to make my own a little different. Even if it is is small items that really don't matter, I give my computer a personal touch. This may not apply to everyone, but i like for my belongings to feel like they are my special item, no matter if it costs 50 cents or 5000 dollars.

So as you can see, I really prefer homebuilt. I enjoy building computers and making it a small personal project, I enjoy configuring it my own way, and i dont like paying extra for stuff that i can get cheaper(components, software), or that is completely unnecessary(For me Tech Support). I hope this helps you decide. Good luck with your decision, and i hope it works out for you. Laughing


Return to posts index

brownalan
Re: DIY vs. Turnkey...
on Mar 30, 2004 at 7:55:41 pm

Thanks for the feedback. To be honest, I am drawn toward the DIY version for some of the reasons you talk about. I'm just a little leary of my handyman skills, and I'd hate to frazzle my new mobo because I didn't connect the dots properly.

BTW - is building your own pc a simple matter of plugging things in the right places. Will I need any tools besides a phillips head screwdriver?

Also I know of tomshardware.com, but are there any other sites you guys would recommend for a newbie that decided to take the plunge into home built pc's.

I know pricewatch is a good source for the parts. Do you recommend any other sites for shopping?

I know I asked a few questions there. I much appreciate the time taken to answer any or all of them...

alan


Return to posts index


Michael P
Re: DIY vs. Turnkey...
on Mar 31, 2004 at 5:17:00 am

Building your own computer is really easy. All you really need would be the Screwdriver set (just incase one company gives you a smaller screw head size) and also i would recommend for a self proclaimed newbie Wink that you purchase an Anti-Static Bracelet. You put this dorky looking bracelet on, and then connect a cord that is attached to the bracelet onto the chassis of your computer. What this does is create a ground between the machine and you. By creating a ground, you have less risk in shorting out a chip via Static Electricity. I no longer use one (im a daredevil Wink ), but that was my best friend when i built my first computer.

If you want some of the best prices around from a reliable, fast store, with great customer support and RMA service (if you need it), then look no further than http://www.Newegg.com . I stumbled upon them a while ago, and have loved them ever since. Though their prices are not the lowest possible in every example, you do get great service, fast shipment (if in stock), and documentation through every step. They are a great company and I would trust them for your one stop shopping for this computer.

And about the messing up pins and bending things, etc., i wouldn't worry about it. Every part that you buy will come with it's own documentation about installation, trouble shooting, etc.. My only advice for you on this topic is do not EVER force anything that seems like it wont go in... If the processor wont go in the holes, make sure you have the lever lifted, or that you have the pins aligned correctly. All it takes is one pin to get bent or broken off to make your new system a flop. It shouldn't be that hard if you just read the manuals (or just skim even).

About the Websites for building your own PC, i am not really that sure of any. I just decided to build my own after my parents had been getting screwed over and got horrible service from a few different vendors (HP, Compaq, Packard bell to name a few).

Good luck on you purchasing/building your system. I wish you the best of luck, and just want to remind you of a few things.

1. Get an Anti Static Wrist strap. (it will probably be recommended if you purchase a processor at newegg.com)

2. Make sure that you plan out EVERYTHING. Don't go buying a motherboard, case, processor, ram, video card, sound card and then all of a sudden, WOOPS! can't turn my computer on because i forgot a power supply! Make sure you have a list of what you are looking for, and then check it off after you have added it to your cart online. (hell double check it!!!)

3. Do not force anything that is giving back way to much pressure. Warranty does not cover defective materials due to incorrect installs (bent pins included)

4. Make sure to have adequate cooling. Though my system may be on the loud side (i don't really hear it at all, but others notice), i have 6 case fans installed, and still have my machine running considerably hot. I recommend you allow for proper air flow (make the fans in the front of the computer take in air, the ones in the back blow out air)

5. If you have a child that will use this machine, or if you are a student, look for student discounts. There are none on hardware that i could find, but on Newegg you can get anything from Video Editing programs to Windows xp pro discounted if you are a student. Make sure that you can actually take advantage of these student claims though, don't go fraudulantly getting discounts(Felony).

Those are my top 5 tips. I hope they help you out, and good luck again on all of your DIY ventures!


Return to posts index

Michael P
Re: DIY vs. Turnkey...
on Mar 31, 2004 at 5:17:42 am

Building your own computer is really easy. All you really need would be the Screwdriver set (just incase one company gives you a smaller screw head size) and also i would recommend for a self proclaimed newbie Wink that you purchase an Anti-Static Bracelet. You put this dorky looking bracelet on, and then connect a cord that is attached to the bracelet onto the chassis of your computer. What this does is create a ground between the machine and you. By creating a ground, you have less risk in shorting out a chip via Static Electricity. I no longer use one (im a daredevil Wink ), but that was my best friend when i built my first computer.

If you want some of the best prices around from a reliable, fast store, with great customer support and RMA service (if you need it), then look no further than http://www.Newegg.com . I stumbled upon them a while ago, and have loved them ever since. Though their prices are not the lowest possible in every example, you do get great service, fast shipment (if in stock), and documentation through every step. They are a great company and I would trust them for your one stop shopping for this computer.

And about the messing up pins and bending things, etc., i wouldn't worry about it. Every part that you buy will come with it's own documentation about installation, trouble shooting, etc.. My only advice for you on this topic is do not EVER force anything that seems like it wont go in... If the processor wont go in the holes, make sure you have the lever lifted, or that you have the pins aligned correctly. All it takes is one pin to get bent or broken off to make your new system a flop. It shouldn't be that hard if you just read the manuals (or just skim even).

About the Websites for building your own PC, i am not really that sure of any. I just decided to build my own after my parents had been getting screwed over and got horrible service from a few different vendors (HP, Compaq, Packard bell to name a few).

Good luck on you purchasing/building your system. I wish you the best of luck, and just want to remind you of a few things.

1. Get an Anti Static Wrist strap. (it will probably be recommended if you purchase a processor at newegg.com)

2. Make sure that you plan out EVERYTHING. Don't go buying a motherboard, case, processor, ram, video card, sound card and then all of a sudden, WOOPS! can't turn my computer on because i forgot a power supply! Make sure you have a list of what you are looking for, and then check it off after you have added it to your cart online. (hell double check it!!!)

3. Do not force anything that is giving back way to much pressure. Warranty does not cover defective materials due to incorrect installs (bent pins included)

4. Make sure to have adequate cooling. Though my system may be on the loud side (i don't really hear it at all, but others notice), i have 6 case fans installed, and still have my machine running considerably hot. I recommend you allow for proper air flow (make the fans in the front of the computer take in air, the ones in the back blow out air)

5. If you have a child that will use this machine, or if you are a student, look for student discounts. There are none on hardware that i could find, but on Newegg you can get anything from Video Editing programs to Windows xp pro discounted if you are a student. Make sure that you can actually take advantage of these student claims though, don't go fraudulantly getting discounts(Felony).

Those are my top 5 tips. I hope they help you out, and good luck again on all of your DIY ventures!


Return to posts index

treetsux
Re: DIY vs. Turnkey...
on Apr 1, 2004 at 4:19:18 pm

I agree, DIY is the way to go. I watch other people buy Dells and Gateways and the dreaded Hewlett packards and have crazy amounts of error messages. it seems theyre reinstalling their OS every month.
my last 2 computers ive built and they have always run like a dream.
just my 2 cents.


Return to posts index


Jon Oransky
Re: DIY vs. Turnkey...
on Apr 1, 2004 at 6:30:31 pm

building your own machine is best. when you buy from dell/hp or whatever there's always something in the system you won't want. this way, you get all the parts you want, you have control over the manufacturer of the parts etc.

- Jon

http://www.videoguys.com
800-323-2325 x120


Return to posts index

D_
Re: DIY vs. Turnkey...
by
on Apr 7, 2004 at 3:44:56 am

Recommend DIY!

In July 2002, I built my first DIY Computer. I spent $1460 at mwave.com (A little over my planned budget of around $1000...) A similarly equipped machine was listed at Dell for over $3000.

My DIY has been running like a champ with ZERO problems.

CAUTIONS!

1. Only get equipment proven to work well with your selected chipsets and proven to do video well! There are web sites, magazines and books to help you build your machine. A google search will help, just be wary that most DIY machines are tuned for games, not video--so choose carefully.

Pinnacle DC-10 did not work well with my Ali Chipset.
Adaptec DuoConnect (USB 2.0 and IEEE 1394 Firewire) captured video just fine, but dropped frames on output to tape.
ADS Pyro 1394DV works flawlessly.


2. Save all the paperwork and data you can find on your equipment. Downloading and printing spec sheets is a good idea should anything need replacing or if you want to talk on forums like this years after you have built the machine (grin).

3. Document your work. You probably won't remember details of what you did years later when you build your second machine (grin), and the notes will come in handy.

Just for the curious,

Athalon 1.33Ghz, 512MB RAM, System Drive 20GB, Still Image Drive 40GB, Video Drive 60GB (3x20GB Raid 0) running Windows98SE Japanese Edition.

Parts list:
Athalon 1333 L2 Cache 256Kb, 266 System Bus
IWill KA266-R (Sound, USB 1.1, and Raid on the motherboard) (Ali Chipset)
512MB RAM (2x 256MB 266Mhz DDR PC2100)
ELSA Gladiac 511 64MB AGP GEFORCE MX400 w/TV Out
Enermax EG365P-VE 350W Power Supply
4x IBM 20GB Ultra ATA/100 7200 RPM 8.5MS 2MB Buffer
(*Unknown 40GB - Forgot to take down the data...*)
Lian-Li PC60 Mid Tower (4x 5.25 bays 3 x3.5 bays 3x3.5 hidden bays)
Linksys Etherfast 10/100 LAN Card
ADS Pyro 1394
Plexwriter 12/10/32S CD-RW/R Drive
Generic CD Drive
Floppy Drive

Dylan


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]