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selby52
Newbie Raid question
on Sep 9, 2002 at 1:53:04 am

I would like to set up a Raid system, but have little experience. Could any of you recommend a good Raid card? I found some on ebay for around $30-40. Are those too generic to be worht buying? Or should I go with the $100 Promise cards? Any help would be greatly appriciated. Thanks in advace.


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alwayslearning
Re: Newbie Raid question
on Sep 9, 2002 at 8:51:02 pm

I use a RAID system but the controller is built into my MB.
I can tell you though that I have read nothing but good on the Promise stuff.
Not much help, but that is all I know.
I can tell you that RAID is very easy to set up and has been very reliable for me.
I am only using RAID-0 (striping). Files open very fast and frames are never dropped. I don't think that these days though, frames would be dropped ever even with just a single drive as long as it is a 7200 RPM.

Let us know what you get and how it works out. That helps make these boards more useful.
Thanks, AlwaysLearning


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ciabt
Re: Newbie Raid question
on Sep 9, 2002 at 8:56:51 pm

Hi there
I have heard people talking about video RAIDs quite a bit but arent't exactly sure what they are, could anyone help explain that to me. Also what do you need to setup one? Thanks for your time!


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Ted Jan
Re: Newbie Raid question
on Sep 9, 2002 at 9:12:50 pm

RAIDS is really simple. You take several hard drives and you make them into one logical drive. There are different categories of RAID starting from 0 to 5, I believe, it's been awhile since I've set one up.

The basic principle of RAID is to provide redunancy of stored information. Whatever information that you are writing to harddrive is stored across multiple harddrives as opposed to one. Thus in the event of a harddrive failure on one drive, it's possible to recreate the info based off of what is stored across the other drives.

Usually you have to be using Windows 2000, NT or XP Pro in order to setup something like this.


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Time4aPint
Re: Newbie Raid question
on Sep 10, 2002 at 5:27:20 am

Just to follow up, RAID 0 is used for speed, not redundancy. Therefore, if you have two (or more) drives set in a RAID 0 configuration and you lose one drive.......you've lost ALL of your data. However, most people that work with video are more interested in speed and can compensate by backing up their files to tape, etc. If you think about it, if you only had one drive that you placed your files on, and that single drive died, you would lose all of your data just as easily.

You can buy RAID controller cards that should work in a variety of operating systems.


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alwayslearning
Re: Newbie Raid question
on Sep 10, 2002 at 1:27:10 pm

Hey Time4apint,

"If you think about it, if you only had one drive that you placed your files on, and that single drive died, you would lose all of your data just as easily."

Exactly what I tell folks that tell me I shouldn't run RAID-0! :)

When my budget allows for it, I will certainly go for the redundancy as well as speed (i.e.RAID-5?). But until then, considering the reliability of drives these days, I figure I have at least 3 years on my RAID-0 drives, plus I have a DVD burner for back up.

Loving the speed of RAID-0, AlwaysLearning



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selby52
Re: Newbie Raid question
on Sep 10, 2002 at 10:39:22 pm

Thanks for the input ya'll. Appreciate it. As alwayslearning suggested, I'll most likely get a Promise card (soon as I get some funds). I've heard lots of good things about them too.


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