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DVD burner (Many problems, many, many question

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lunchtray7777
DVD burner (Many problems, many, many question
on Apr 17, 2003 at 5:27:40 pm

82 minutes of video and audio I edited it on Adobe premier 6.0. Captured it all with a Canopus DV Raptor card. I tried to burn it to DVD using the Sony DRU-500AX, it won't fit on a disk. Will I be able to get all 82 minutes of video and audio on a single disk?

Is there a way to change the speed of the disk from XP to SP or are there bigger DVD disks I can get (bigger than 4.3gig)? I can't seem to find a way anywhere?

Does Adobe have a certain file type I should export as? If you have any suggestions or links that may help please feel free to pass them along.
Thank you very much,
lunchtray


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John Q
Re: DVD burner (Many problems, many, many ques
on Apr 18, 2003 at 11:21:15 pm

I suspect you've only tackled half the project thus far. Digital Video (DV) is a type of MPEG format of video, just not the kind that DVD's use. DV is a fixed compression format at 25 Mb/sec. The DVD spec is MPEG2 IBP format with a maximum combined video and audio data rate of 9.8 Mb/sec.

After you edit your video, you have to transcode it to the correct format for DVD. The maximum video bitrate I use is 7 Mb/sec. To fit 82 minutes, you'd have to transcode at about 6. (I'm not really sure what your XP versus SP discussion references, but it sounds more like the speed setting on a set-top DVD recorder.)

Then you take your transcoded video and audio and author the DVD, building your menus, adding buttons, and attaching your video and audio files to the buttons. Then the DVD authoring program builds the DVD video encoded disc, which contains two directories, AUDIO_TS and VIDEO_TS. The AUDIO_TS directory is always empty, but has to be there for full compatibility. The VIDEO_TS directory contains your IFO, BUP, and VOB files. Whether the DVD authoring program can burn the DVD or you use another burning application, the application must be aware that it's burning a DVD video, as the files have to be placed in the proper sectors for the DVD to work.

No, the largest DVD recordable disc is 4.7 GB (4.37 to Microsoft). For larger discs, you'll have to wait for the Blue Laser discs to hit the street. HOPEFULLY, the manufacturers will agree on a SINGLE standard this time. The blue laser discs will be used for High Definition DVD, which will unfortunately require everyone to buy a new DVD player and television, but I don't know of anyone recording 78's anymore, either.



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newguy
Re: DVD burner (Many problems, many, many ques
on Apr 28, 2003 at 3:12:32 am

Hi,
there is no such thing called XP and SP in dvd authoring :) if you want to store more video on a disk than lower the bitrate when you encode it. use digital audio to save of room for video. A good encoder can help also.
I usuall burn 120 min/one dvd-r (for good quality).
NG.


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lunchtray7777
Re: DVD burner (Many problems, many, many ques
on Apr 28, 2003 at 6:14:47 pm

Thx guys your, info has helped greatly. Hey Newguy what encoder are you using and at what bitrate do you do your endcoding for 120 minutes, I'm using a Canopus encoder and have been playing around with the bitrate to find the best/max potential?


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John Q
Re: DVD burner (Many problems, many, many ques
on Apr 30, 2003 at 4:15:24 am

If your DVD authoring program will encode the audio as Dobly AC3, then you can transcode at about 5 Mb/sec variable bitrate (VBR). If you have to encode the audio as PCM, you're down to 4.


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