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f131
Converting Video to MPEG 2 in Premier 6.5
by
on Sep 2, 2003 at 3:57:31 am

Hello. I am new to DVD burning but have been doing video news photography for 14 years. My question is, when I convert a timeline to MPEG 2:
1. Is the video and audio always seperated?
2. Is the video quality supposed to look that bad (jerky, poor quality) and is what I see going to look that bad on DVD?

The source video is an uncompressed AVI files direct from my digital camera through my Canopus FW Card.

Thanks ahead for the assistance.


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Gary Bettan
Re: Converting Video to MPEG 2 in Premier 6.5
on Sep 2, 2003 at 1:27:42 pm

Please be more specific about your Canopus hardware and the settings you used for MPEG2 export.

Gary

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f131
Re: Converting Video to MPEG 2 in Premier 6.5
by
on Sep 2, 2003 at 10:02:47 pm

Gary,
My computer at work (P3 550)uses the DV Raptor I bought from you guys 3 yrs ago. My home computer is an ABS P4 2.8G, 1G of 2700 RAM, and ATI 9700 Pro video card. The firewire connection I am using comes off my Soundblaster Audigy audio card. Editing works great on both computers but obviously faster on my newer home system. I fiddled with the MPEG 2 settings in Premier 6.5 and they were preset to the medium quality export setting. The quality of the MPEG 2 conversion now looks much better, but I am still confused why my audio channel is converted seperatly from the video. What might I be missing? Thanks. And yes, I might be interested in the Adobe Video bundle you have.
Bob


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John Q
Re: Converting Video to MPEG 2 in Premier 6.5
on Sep 3, 2003 at 1:37:34 am

You do want separate video and audio files for DVD authoring, because the DVD authoring application will create them as part of the authoring process. The two streams will be recombined into VOB files for the DVD. It just takes less time to author with primary streams.

The quality of the video is a function of your transcoder bitrate. The maximum combined audio and video bitrate of a DVD is 9.8 Mb/sec. The audio can be encoded in either PCM, essentially WAV format at 1.6 Mb/sec, leaving about 7 Mb/sec for the video. Of course, a maximum of 7 Mb/sec isn't absolute. There will be spikes that exceed your maximum set rate, which is why encoding at 7 should be done with constant bitrate (CBR), as this will minimize spikes. At 7, you should be able to fit about 75 minutes on a DVD. To fit more, you need to encode at a lower bitrate. To fit 2 hours, you should encode at about 4.5 Mb/sec variable bitrate (VBR), although some DVD players don't like VBR encoded DVD-R's.

If you're encoding to MPEG-1 format, which is normally used for VCD, you won't be happy. The bitrate and resolution are just too low, supposedly comparable to VHS, but that's only true for video with little motion.

The other issue to deal with in transcoding for DVD is field order. NTSC video is lower field first, interleaved video. If you encode with the wrong field order, you'll get a jagged, venetian blind effect on motion.

Hope this helps.


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