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980X or Sandy Bridge?

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Jairo Gómez
980X or Sandy Bridge?
on Jan 11, 2011 at 1:25:05 am

Hello everyone, this is my first time here, and finally i dare to make a question, (forgive me for my bad english)
i just need help because i want to build a nle system. It also has to be powerfull enough to handle very well Premiere Pro, After Effects and Maya. Lately all my projects are in HD, i own a Canon 60d and all my videos are in fullHD. So, i need faster render, y smooth work in after effects and maya. My budget...let's say..around $2500.

So i have a few questions
1. Sandy Bridge or the fastest previous i7?
( i have heard that SB it's not recommeded for editing because the QuickSync it's not "compatible" with other graphics cards )
2. Nvidia Quadro 4000 or GTX 480?


The last question comes because i have seen this benchmark and i realized that the fastest machines uses GTX 480 (x2) for the mercury playback engine:
http://ppbm5.com/Benchmark5.html

Thanks everyone, i hope you could help me
bye


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Jcschild
Re: 980X or Sandy Bridge?
on Jan 11, 2011 at 5:24:07 pm

i already posted numbers up on PPm tests.
Sandy bridge would be my recommendation.

Scott
ADK


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RJL0365
Re: 980X or Sandy Bridge?
on Jan 12, 2011 at 3:47:36 pm

jagoku: Hello everyone, this is my first time here, and finally i dare to make a question, (forgive me for my bad english)
i just need help because i want to build a nle system. It also has to be powerfull enough to handle very well Premiere Pro, After Effects and Maya. Lately all my projects are in HD, i own a Canon 60d and all my videos are in fullHD. So, i need faster render, y smooth work in after effects and maya. My budget...let's say..around $2500.

So i have a few questions
1. Sandy Bridge or the fastest previous i7?
( i have heard that SB it's not recommeded for editing because the QuickSync it's not "compatible" with other graphics cards )
2. Nvidia Quadro 4000 or GTX 480?


The last question comes because i have seen this benchmark and i realized that the fastest machines uses GTX 480 (x2) for the mercury playback engine:
http://ppbm5.com/Benchmark5.html

Thanks everyone, i hope you could help me
bye


The only potential problem with Sandy Bridge is the relatively limited number of PCIe lanes. At least all 20 or so lanes on the LGA 1155 platform are full-bandwidth PCIe 2.0. You can use a higher-end hardware PCIe RAID card on a P67 motherboard as long as the following conditions are met:

1) The motherboard must have at least one x4 or higher PCIe slot (in addition to the main graphics card PCIe x16 slot)
2) If the PCIe x4 slot shares bandwidth with any PCIe x1 slot(s), make sure no cards are plugged into any of the PCIe x1 slots (otherwise, the x4 slot will drop to x1 mode)
3) If the motherboard used has two PCIe x16 slots that are bifurcated into two x8 slots when both slots are occupied by cards (with the hardware RAID card plugged into one of those slots), then the GPU-accelerated performance may suffer slightly.

As for the Sandy Bridge CPU's "QuickSync" feature, it is currently supported only by the CPU's integrated graphics core (which, in turn, is disabled when the CPU is on a P67 motherboard; only the H- and B-series chipsets currently support the CPU's integrated graphics function although a new Z68 chipset is due to be introduced within the next several months). In addition, QuickSync is automatically disabled when a discrete graphics card equipped with a GPU that lacks QuickSync support is used in lieu of the CPU's integrated graphics function. (Currently, all Nvidia and AMD GPUs lack support for QuickSync; however, future Nvidia GPUs may support QuickSync thanks to a new agreement between Nvidia and Intel.)

And current pro and "prosumer" NLEs do not support QuickSync. (Nor will they support QuickSync for the foreseeable future.)

As for the PPBM5 benchmark, it applies specifically to rendering and transcoding in Premiere Pro CS5 and Adobe Media Encoder CS5. The CS5's Mercury Playback Engine GPU Accelerated mode currently supports only one Nvidia GPU. This means that if you have two graphics cards, only the primary one is used for GPU acceleration. Similarly, if you have one of those rare cards with dual GPUs on one card (as is/was the case with the GTX 295), only one of the GPUs on the card is used for GPU acceleration (and in the case of the GTX 295, that card would perform as if it were merely a GTX 275 since the GTX 295 is basically two GTX 275s in a single package).


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Jairo Gómez
Re: 980X or Sandy Bridge?
on Jan 13, 2011 at 1:31:22 am

RJL0365:

The only potential problem with Sandy Bridge is the relatively limited number of PCIe lanes. At least all 20 or so lanes on the LGA 1155 platform are full-bandwidth PCIe 2.0. You can use a higher-end hardware PCIe RAID card on a P67 motherboard as long as the following conditions are met:

1) The motherboard must have at least one x4 or higher PCIe slot (in addition to the main graphics card PCIe x16 slot)
2) If the PCIe x4 slot shares bandwidth with any PCIe x1 slot(s), make sure no cards are plugged into any of the PCIe x1 slots (otherwise, the x4 slot will drop to x1 mode)
3) If the motherboard used has two PCIe x16 slots that are bifurcated into two x8 slots when both slots are occupied by cards (with the hardware RAID card plugged into one of those slots), then the GPU-accelerated performance may suffer slightly.

As for the Sandy Bridge CPU's "QuickSync" feature, it is currently supported only by the CPU's integrated graphics core (which, in turn, is disabled when the CPU is on a P67 motherboard; only the H- and B-series chipsets currently support the CPU's integrated graphics function although a new Z68 chipset is due to be introduced within the next several months). In addition, QuickSync is automatically disabled when a discrete graphics card equipped with a GPU that lacks QuickSync support is used in lieu of the CPU's integrated graphics function. (Currently, all Nvidia and AMD GPUs lack support for QuickSync; however, future Nvidia GPUs may support QuickSync thanks to a new agreement between Nvidia and Intel.)

And current pro and "prosumer" NLEs do not support QuickSync. (Nor will they support QuickSync for the foreseeable future.)

As for the PPBM5 benchmark, it applies specifically to rendering and transcoding in Premiere Pro CS5 and Adobe Media Encoder CS5. The CS5's Mercury Playback Engine GPU Accelerated mode currently supports only one Nvidia GPU. This means that if you have two graphics cards, only the primary one is used for GPU acceleration. Similarly, if you have one of those rare cards with dual GPUs on one card (as is/was the case with the GTX 295), only one of the GPUs on the card is used for GPU acceleration (and in the case of the GTX 295, that card would perform as if it were merely a GTX 275 since the GTX 295 is basically two GTX 275s in a single package).


Ok, I understand the problem with the quicksync, and the explanation on how it works the Mercury Playback. I read before about the problem you mencioned about the PCIe lanes, but i couldn't understand it very well back then, because im just learning about computers and there are so many things i don´t know.

So, maybe you could help me to reach a conclusion.
1. It's better for the kind of work i have to do (Maya,After Effects, Nuke, Premiere) to have a Quadro FX card or a GTX card?
2. Taking apart the quicksync, just the two processors working with the cores, it's better the i72600k or the i7980x?
3. Which Mobo should be better in order to make an upgrade to the new Ivy Bridge processor and DDr4 Ram that has been announced?
4. And Finnally, and i hope i'm not been too annyoing, i was decided to buy a pc with a quadro 4000 card an i7 980x processor a HD 1TB with 10k and an Asus Mobo like p6t7 Supercomputer or the P6 ws professional. But with the realese of this new technology i was very confused on what to do, for me it's a huge investment and i need it to be a very good system that lasts in time, and i feel that right now there's a little jump in technology and we are expecting what's going to happend. So i dont know if it's better for me to wait a few months to see whats on the market, or should i go with the system i have thought before but with different components to make an upgrade later on. What do you suggest?
Thanks!


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Jcschild
Re: 980X or Sandy Bridge?
on Jan 14, 2011 at 2:21:08 pm

for your very small budget your only real option is the 2600k Sandy bridge. plus for the $ the 980x is not worth it..

for maya i would do the 580 video card the 4000 (or any quadro is a joke)

you also need 2 raid 0 arrays.

no need for and 8 drive raid array but if you do need it gigbaytes P67 UD7 allows for a 4/8x raid card.

Scott
ADK


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Jairo Gómez
Thanks
on Jan 15, 2011 at 5:36:26 pm

Ok thanks for the advice


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RJL0365
Re: 980X or Sandy Bridge?
on Feb 1, 2011 at 12:44:07 am

There is one major snag to this upgrade advice:

Intel has stopped shipments of its P67 and H67 chipsets due to a design flaw in the chipset that adversely affects the long-term performance of the SATA 3.0 Gbps ports (there are four or five such ports in the P67 and H67 chipsets). Over time, the sequential transfer performance out of the SATA 3.0 Gbps ports becomes much slower than when new, which may lead to corruption and/or loss of data. (The SATA 6.0 Gbps ports are unaffected by this bug.) If you already have a Sandy Bridge system, it is advised that you hold off on running any video-editing software until you replace the motherboard since only two SATA ports would be reliable (and thus you're limited to a system with a single hard drive for absolutely everything).

Intel will start manufacturing a new "fixed" revision of these chipsets some time in February.

Not everyone will suffer this problem. But I threw this warning out there just to make potential buyers and existing users aware of.


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Jairo Gómez
Re: 980X or Sandy Bridge?
on Feb 14, 2011 at 3:42:26 pm

RJL0365: There is one major snag to this upgrade advice:

Intel has stopped shipments of its P67 and H67 chipsets due to a design flaw in the chipset that adversely affects the long-term performance of the SATA 3.0 Gbps ports (there are four or five such ports in the P67 and H67 chipsets). Over time, the sequential transfer performance out of the SATA 3.0 Gbps ports becomes much slower than when new, which may lead to corruption and/or loss of data. (The SATA 6.0 Gbps ports are unaffected by this bug.) If you already have a Sandy Bridge system, it is advised that you hold off on running any video-editing software until you replace the motherboard since only two SATA ports would be reliable (and thus you're limited to a system with a single hard drive for absolutely everything).

Intel will start manufacturing a new "fixed" revision of these chipsets some time in February.

Not everyone will suffer this problem. But I threw this warning out there just to make potential buyers and existing users aware of.




Thanks for the advice, i have not bought the system yet, but i will do it maybe the next month, i haven't decided yet if i going to use a sandy bridge configuration or not.


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thekidd77
motherboard
on Mar 11, 2011 at 10:09:29 pm

are there any boards out right now for sandy bridge that wont have this problem.

Which board should I buy today if going with the sandy bridge chip


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RJL0365
Re: motherboard
on Mar 21, 2011 at 9:50:50 pm

thekidd77: are there any boards out right now for sandy bridge that wont have this problem.

Which board should I buy today if going with the sandy bridge chip


A limited stock of the P67 motherboards with the new B3 stepping (original Sandy Bridge motherboards had the earlier, recalled B2 stepping of that chipset) have arrived at major resellers. I picked up one of the new B3 motherboards (an Asus P8P67 PRO) today with the intention of picking up an i7-2600K within the next several days.

I will be selling off most of my current i7-950 core components except RAM to pay for the CPU. If my system works with four of the six 2GB modules (8GB total) that I currently have in my main rig (whose core components will be sold off) at the stock DDR3-1333 speed, I will consider replacing all of those modules with 4 x 4GB DDR3 modules (for a total of 16GB).

UPDATE: Looks like my RAM expansion is coming sooner than I thought.


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