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DIY6 - No Fault Tolerance?

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jeffcss
DIY6 - No Fault Tolerance?
on Apr 11, 2008 at 6:41:50 pm

I was just wondering why the DIY 6 machine uses RAID 0 for Video Storage. If either drive fails, then you lose ALL the data.

For those that can't afford the G-Tech G-Speed system ($1429) a better configuration would be to use (2) 500 GB hard drives and mirror them. At least a strong warning about RAID 0 pitfalls would be in order for the newbies.

I don't think we should trade speed for data safety. Just my 2 cents.


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Gary Bettan
Re: DIY6 - No Fault Tolerance?
on Apr 12, 2008 at 1:14:50 am

We've been recommending raid 0 for video for years. That's a dedicated drive for your OS and programs, with a seperate RAID0 for video. While it is true that eventually drives fail, it rarely happens out of the blue. you hear it, or you experience erratic behavior or noticably slower performance. If that starts happening, back up your work immediately!

You bring up an improtant warning about RAID0 that can't be denied - you take a risk for the performance. If one drive dies, you lose all the data. Since we use a 2 drive RAID, we double the chance of this happening. While it is rare, it does happen

If you want redundancy and performance, go with RAID 0. A raid 1 mirror for your video gives you redundancy, but nowhere near the performance of raid 0 or raid 5.

The G-Speeed eS gives you the best off all worlds. Incredible performance and fault tolerance.

Gary


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Tom O'Farrell
Re: DIY6 - No Fault Tolerance?
on Apr 12, 2008 at 6:15:15 am

I don't understand why you cannot use raid0 drives of say two at 500GB each total 1TB, without a separate system drive, and save your captures including audio (I record audio separately from the cameras using a hard disk recorder) to individual folders on these raided drives and edit using these folders as source files with your system files in it's own folder.
In the early 1990's when I first started video editing on Premiere we were told to have a separate system drive and twin drives on SCSI for the actual video but my question is why? A single large drive is simpler surely?


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John Q
Re: DIY6 - No Fault Tolerance?
on Apr 12, 2008 at 6:59:19 pm

You need a separate OS and video drive because Windows will always take priority access to the OS drive. If you're capturing video on your OS drive and Windows takes control of the drive, you end up with dropped video frames.


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