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Newbie question - Studio 8 on a new computer?

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cmtorres
Newbie question - Studio 8 on a new computer?
on Jun 21, 2006 at 3:21:22 pm

A few years back I used to run Pinnacle Studio 8 DV on a P3/1Ghz machine with 128 MB ram. It seemed adequate for the type of editing I wanted to do, but whenever I tried to render the final product, the CPU would peg at 100% and the machine would freeze up. So I stopped trying.

Fast forward a few years and I've got 2 kids ready to start playing sports (read: lots of video coming up). I'm ready to get a new computer strictly for video editing and have a few questions.

1. Would running the old Studio 8 software on a newer/faster computer (with lots of ram) see it run faster. I ask this becasue I don't really require a lot of bells and whistles, just a stable, user friendly video editing prgram. Studio 8 seems to fit the bill (for me)... I certainly can't beat the price.

2. Were there any major bugs in Studio 8 that would warrant upgrading to a newer version? I've read that Studio 9 was buggy, but I haven't read anything about Studio 8.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

-Craig


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Matt Gray
Re: Newbie question - Studio 8 on a new computer?
on Jun 22, 2006 at 12:55:06 am

Craig-

I'm a long-time user of Studio. Version 8 was the worst experience I've ever had. Studio 7 was great (with patches) but 8 seemed to be extremely buggy. That said, I ran Studio 8 on a 2.4Ghz with 128MB memory and it was still poor. I suggest just tossing the software and looking for either 9 plus if you can find it or the new 10.5. Version 9 plus has been very stable (1 or 2 patches to download) and I've used it quite a bit for 2 years. Currently practicing with my Adobe Pro collection 1.5 but I'm still utilizing my Studio program for official pieces of work until I am properly fluent with Premiere.

Either way you go, invest in some more memory. At least 1GB if you can do that.


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cmtorres
re:newbie question
on Jun 22, 2006 at 9:45:56 am

QTofW: Craig-

I'm a long-time user of Studio. Version 8 was the worst experience I've ever had. Studio 7 was great (with patches) but 8 seemed to be extremely buggy. That said, I ran Studio 8 on a 2.4Ghz with 128MB memory and it was still poor. I suggest just tossing the software and looking for either 9 plus if you can find it or the new 10.5. Version 9 plus has been very stable (1 or 2 patches to download) and I've used it quite a bit for 2 years. Currently practicing with my Adobe Pro collection 1.5 but I'm still utilizing my Studio program for official pieces of work until I am properly fluent with Premiere.

Either way you go, invest in some more memory. At least 1GB if you can do that.

Thanks Q,

That's exactly the type of information I was looking for. So I guess I'm in the market for some new software in addition to a new box. So the next question is, should I settle on a software package then build/buy a computer around its specs or just get the most wicked box I can afford and go from there?

-craig


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Matt Gray
Re: Newbie question - Studio 8 on a new computer?
on Jun 23, 2006 at 6:21:00 pm

Craig-

I'll tell you what I did. While my 2.4Ghz (128MB) tower was okay for a couple years while learning the ropes, I finally scored a film job for about $5500. I used $2200 of that to build a box specifically for my preferences. I read, price shopped, read and then read some more for about 6 months until I knew exactly what I wanted. I found the best prices for every component shopping at Tigerdirect.com and Newegg.com.

However, I went a little overboard with some things because my budget allowed. But you could easily spend $1200 and come away with a much better machine than you're using now. The CPU power will come in handing for rendering stability and the memory increase will take away the processing delays when editing in Studio.

Personally, I decided to build my NLE machine based on what I wanted inside the box. I've found software/hardware compatibilty hasn't been an issue in my case but I'm only using Studio and Adobe Premiere. I would build the best box possible and then decide on software. Just put the emphasis on memory and make sure you have at least 1 additional hard drive to store raw footage.

If you do a lot of editing, I recommend an external drive to store .avi files of completed projects.


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EricBowen
Re: Newbie question - Studio 8 on a new computer?
on Jun 30, 2006 at 11:02:44 pm

Depending on your budget then I would look at a Dual core setup also planning on the Conroe chip release from Intel in July. ideal situation would be to get a system board now that can handle the Conroe chip in the future when you are ready to upgrade so all you have to replace then is the CPU. I suggest looking for a config as follows:

Intel 950 3.4 GHz Dual Core

Intel Rev3 975xBX or P5W DH Deluxe motherboard

2 GB DDR 2 800 or 667 (considerable difference in benchmarks between 800 and 667 ram though)

2x Seagate 16m 7200 HDD (preferably in raid 0 which means you would need 4 drives for 2 arrays........... 1 for source/digitizing and 1 for editing/render if you are looking to edit uncompressed SD at a later date)
1 hdd for source and 1 for render will be fine for DV digitizing and editing

PNY Quadro FX 1500 with breakout cable (Dual Link dvi with composite, component, and HD output)
Quadro 1500 preferably for the video card but if budgeting is a requirement then the GForce 7900 or 7600 is ideal

The onboard sound should be fine for audio monitoring but if you want a great audio device for monitoring and gaming then the M-Audio Revolution 7.1 is great for the price.

NLE software- I would definately look at Sony Vegas for your editing software and get away from Pinnacle. Studio was never a very good editor and was often problematic with the breakout box. Sony Vegas is very easy to use & learn to operate, simple media management, complete video and audio editing ability and plugs, as well as the most compatible almost bug free software out today. Its also one of the least expensive. DVD architect is probably the best DVD authoring program out to date and its so easy a kid could learn it and its bundled with Vegas.

Hope that helps some with your research. Please check these products out online and try the Vegas 6.0D demo on Sony's website. I am sure you will like it.

Thank you for your time.
Eric-ADK


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