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Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.

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Christian Friis
Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Feb 21, 2019 at 4:11:07 pm

Hello,
I'm editing away in FCPX, and have done so for years... ☺ But I need to get a good solid grip on the basics - how to set up a library in the best possible way, best backup procedure etc.
Can anyone point me in direction of the best online tutorials? (Paid or free).
Bonus question: Back in the days I did backups to DLT drives. I save all major projects in case clients return at some point for new edits based on the original material etc. I preferred DLT as i didn't risk a hd error when returning to it, say 5 years later. But my DLT drive is long gone (maybe I should have kept it - When my last DVD master was done, I thrashed it) and since then I've backedup to hd's - with the risks this entails. Back in the even earlier days I kept EDLs together with my master tapes. But doing this together with various flash drives, doesn't seem to be the obvious choice. Long intro... How do you backup 'longterm'? (if you do). Does anyone think they've cracked the nut on this area?!
Thanks, Christian.


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Winston A. Cely
Re: Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Feb 22, 2019 at 2:22:48 pm

It sounds like your asking about basics for workflow. This is something I struggle with as a teacher with my students. We're doing tiny, tiny projects, so the workflow should be simple, but then I think that I'm not doing my job as a teacher showing them all the ins-and-outs of FCPX workflow. So, I read a ton on this and it seems like it's different for each type of job and each editor. I think that's awesome, but it's also confusing in as much as there's not some standard for everything no matter what you do. I could be wrong, but that's what it seems like. That being said, if you've been using FCPX for a while, and you're not experiencing anything horrible with your workflow, you're probably doing everything you need to. However, I think Ripple Training is a great resource. They have both paid (via their website), and free tutorials (via YouTube) that I find invaluable. Not to mention their instructors are top notch and working professionals.

As for long term storage of client material, I would build in the cost of buying an external SSD for each client, when the job is done, I would copy everything to the SSD and give it back to them for keeping track of it. They bought it anyway, and it makes more sense for them to hold on to it. Plus, an SSD should be a little more stable for longterm, storage and in active use. (I remember one of the things about HHDs was that if they sit for too long without running they can lock up).

I could be wrong about all of this... Just my experience.

Winston A. Cely
ACTC Media Broadcasting Video Instructor
Apple Certified Editor FCPX 3

"If you can talk brilliantly enough about a subject, you can create the consoling illusion it has been mastered." - Stanley Kubrick


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Mark Suszko
Re: Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Feb 22, 2019 at 3:38:18 pm

I think the editor part of me likes your idea of giving the client an SSD of assets for them to be in charge of. But it also cautions that clients are unreliable in terms of responsibility for assets. The only upside is, if the footage gets lost, they can only blame themselves, not you.

The businessman part of me says, don't include the project files, copyrighted stock or music you paid for, or any other "secret sauce" on that drive, that the client or another editor could use to re-work your project. You want them to come to YOU for that, so don't give away your chance at repeat business and don't give a competitor the keys to your stuff.

There are a lot of good trainers out there, Ripple is popular. Lynda and Creative Live are a few more. I like Larry Jordan's tutorials, and he has one specifically devoted to FCPX workflow that you might want to watch. Larry's friendly, low-key, talkative approach assumes you know nothing to start with, so some experienced people may get impatient, but he's thorough and very organized, each step building on the previous one, and he eventually gets there in a disciplined and comprehensive fashion, which I appreciate.


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Winston A. Cely
Re: Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Feb 22, 2019 at 3:58:58 pm

I totally agree with everything Mark says, and to specify myself a bit more, I would only give them this if it were a client you don't anticipate working with in the near future. If it's someone you work with on a regular or semi-regular basis, I would still back it up to a "client drive," just not give it back unless requested by the client again for all the reasons Mark mentioned above.

Winston A. Cely
ACTC Media Broadcasting Video Instructor
Apple Certified Editor FCPX 3

"If you can talk brilliantly enough about a subject, you can create the consoling illusion it has been mastered." - Stanley Kubrick


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Christian Friis
Re: Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Feb 23, 2019 at 1:13:23 pm

Hey Winston and Mark,
Great to hear from you both - and interesting to hear your takes on workflow (including 'longterm backup').
I've come across Larry Jordan many times over the years. I think now is the time to invest some hours in getting the basic workflow optimised. I think you've totally right, Winston, in saying that its 'personal'. You have to find (and create) your own preferred 'system'.
When it comes to SSD backups handed to clients... The first thing I think is: SSD drives break too! I haven't had a SSD drive fail, but the worst thing I've tried is having a CF card fail. We had to do the whole production over (not all of it, because we found out there was a error in the proces, but we lost material that we had to re produce - it was possible to have a recover facility sort it out, but it would actually have been more expensive than having an extra production day...!). And come to think of it, DLT drives are not 100% safe either (the linear aspect of it, fools me sometimes :-))... So I guess a mirrored SSD would be the best (yet expensive) solution. Or maybe one SSD and a 'cloud safe'. Either way 2 different locations is preferred - personally I wouldn't leave with the client. Unless this (+ according terms, herunder finance!) was agreed upon to begin with.
Thanks again for your input. I'll start the Larry Jordan 'workflow and editing' course - before my infant wakes up from her nap ☺
Christian.

http://www.oddresort.com


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Mark Smith
Re: Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Feb 23, 2019 at 10:21:31 pm

I have an LTO 5 drive that I use for backing up camera originals and edit libraries. Very similar to DLT just more capacity and it takes the worry out of a drive not booting up when I need the original camera card or edit project.


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Christian Friis
Re: Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Feb 25, 2019 at 10:37:14 pm

Hi Mark,
Never heard of LTO drives 😲 But I want one now 😊
Just out of curiosity... how 'waterproof' are they? Ive had so many HDs burn, and - as mentioned - also a CF card. Have lost a little of my faith in the electronic gods... I guess if you keep the tapes at the right temperature and humidity, 'breakdowns' must be ultra, mega rare...
Christian.

http://www.oddresort.com


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Mark Smith
Re: Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Feb 25, 2019 at 11:14:36 pm

LTO is a linear tape storage system - sort of like DLT but the stotage densities are much greater. LTO 5 which is some years old is 1.5 TB/ tape, LTO 6 is 3.0 TB/tape, LTO 7 is 6.0TB/tape I have an LTO 5 which is far from the latest greatest but still works well. As camera original files increase in size going from 50mbps 1080 to 160 mbps 1080 and higher, UHD, 5K, 6K etc. the desirability of LTO6 & higher becomes apparent.
Last year I had a client come back to me to retrieve a file that was shot in 2010, stored on disk for a while and then migrated to LTO 5 in late 2012. I loaded up the tape, retrieved the files without drama. Keep your tapes stored in a stable room temp climate and they should be good for up to 30 years or so goes the claim.


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Mark Smith
Re: Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Mar 13, 2019 at 6:26:54 pm

I have LTO tapes that are about 6 years old - I’ve stored them in a box over the years at room temp with zero issues restoring files, X libraries, whatever. If you go this route, keep in mind that LTO is great for bulk files, large video files etc. If you are archiving stills, you’ll want to zip them into folders and back up the zipped folders. Its much faster to restore a zipped folder than one that is not zipped.

I use some software called Pre Roll Post as my archive- retrieve software. This app backs up files, retrieves files, lets you virtually browse your back up library offline, does verified checksum backups among other things. Its possible to make do without it, but PRP really does do a great job of handling the backup- retrieval process.


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David Esp
Re: Tutorials - basics, setting up, backup.
on Apr 18, 2019 at 9:15:39 am

Survivalism: EMP weapons (e.g. if ever used terroristically or “warm war” or being tested by some local twit) might kill any powered-up drives, possibly any unshielded SSD’s (especially if leads attached). Such drives should be stored unpowered (!) and without leads attached and ideally inside metal containers. Tapes ought to be ok.


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