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How do you decide on your ProRes export format?

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Tangier Clarke
How do you decide on your ProRes export format?
on Feb 20, 2019 at 5:52:34 pm

Just curious how you all determine which ProRes export format you'll use for your master? I have content that was shot with a C300 (Linear PCM, XF-AVC Intra 4:4:4 12-bit). My inclination is to export the final master in ProRes 4444 in order to maintain the 12-bit color space since not even 422HQ supports 12-bit. Is this how you go about choosing your final master ProRes format as well or what methods do you ultimately use to choose?


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Bouke Vahl
Re: How do you decide on your ProRes export format?
on Feb 21, 2019 at 5:12:00 am

What output formats support 12 bit color except DCP?
Do you think you will ever go to DCP, or something else 12 bits?
Do you have the storage to put it?

It is your decision, and yours only.

Bouke
http://www.videotoolshed.com


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Tangier Clarke
Re: How do you decide on your ProRes export format?
on Feb 21, 2019 at 5:19:03 am

Bouke you're right. I am actually preparing for a DCP, but based on your response I realize I misread something likely due to reading too fast. The ProRes 4444 spec says "...a mathematically lossless alpha channel of up to 16 bits". SO this only applies to the alpha if I am reading this correct.

My concern is, depending on the camera's format used to record (in my caseXF-AVC Intra 4:4:4 12-bit), how do you maintain that bit depth in your exported master. I could be thinking about this all wrong so please enlighten me.


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Bouke Vahl
Re: How do you decide on your ProRes export format?
on Feb 21, 2019 at 5:40:39 am

Well, AFAIK, ProRes 4444 is 12 bits, so it would make a logical choice if you can handle it.

But, (not having seen your work), you would need a pretty hefty image after mastering to really gain from 12 bits.
(12 bits is able to hold 4 times more colors than 10 bits, and 16 times more than 8 bits.)

I bet you won't be able to see the difference between 10 and 12 bits on the big screen. (Not in your studio anyways, since you probably don't have the gear to display it in all it's colors.)

So, if you can, render out a split screen with 10 and 12 bits and make a DCP, then become friends with your local theater for a screening.

I would say, if 12 bits is giving you any problem at any stage, and your budget is below let's say half a million, 10 bits is good enough.
(And yes, others will disagree.)

Again, it's your choice.

Bouke
http://www.videotoolshed.com


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