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Delivery of large files to clients.

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Ed Stevens
Delivery of large files to clients.
on Dec 13, 2015 at 4:36:13 am

Anybody out there delivering the final video to clients as a file?

I'm a wedding videographer, after editing on FCPX, I deliver my clients Blu-rays. I also offer standard definition dvds if they ask for it. I'd like to offer my clients the .mov master file also.

I could provide them with a slim hard drive, formatted for a Mac OS Extended (journaled), loaded with their file(s). But most clients don't have a Mac to read the hard drive.

A 50 minute .mov video is about 30GB. I have less than 1Mbps internet upload speed, so uploading a 30GB online drop box type situation would take 70+ hours, so that's not a good option.

I believe FAT32 is limited to 4GB file size, so that is out.

NTSF is read only on a Mac, so I couldn't load a file on there and I read that if you enable NTFS support on a Mac it's proven unstable.

Any ideas to get big wedding video files to the client? I'm curious what others do to get big file's to their clients.

Thanks!
Ed


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John Davidson
Re: Delivery of large files to clients.
on Dec 13, 2015 at 6:40:59 am

Why not post a 1080p file to Vimeo or YouTube and give them that? I realized a while back that if I convert all these old digital files I have to h264 I would free up a ton of space and everybody is happy. H264 1080p encoding all the way. If you provide sources, run compressor on them and give them the compressed sources.

My 2 cents.

John Davidson | President / Creative Director | Magic Feather Inc.


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John Rofrano
Re: Delivery of large files to clients.
on Dec 13, 2015 at 2:01:52 pm
Last Edited By John Rofrano on Dec 13, 2015 at 2:03:50 pm

[Ed Stevens] " I'd like to offer my clients the .mov master file also. "
If you really mean Master File as in ProRes 422 master from FCP X I wouldn't do that. In fact, I wouldn't give them any kind of MOV file because that would require Windows customers to download and install QuickTime because Windows cannot play MOV files by default. Sure lots of Windows users may already have QuickTime but for those that don't you are causing a headache because they can't simply watch the video without downloading additional software (that is fairly intrusive I might add). There are also Windows users who are "Apple-phobic" and won't install QuickTime on their computers at all. It's best to avoid that whole mess and not offer MOV files.

A much better approach would be to offer them a 1080p AVC/H.264 .M4V file created with the Apple Devices 1080p option in FCP X instead. That will be playable on any operating system (Mac, PC, Tablet, Phone, etc.) and will not require that they download anything.
[Ed Stevens] "I believe FAT32 is limited to 4GB file size, so that is out."
You want to use the ExFAT format (Extended File Allocation Table) which is a Microsoft file system optimized for flash drives. That can be read and written by both Windows and OS X and does not have the 4GB limitation like FAT32. You can use the Mac Disk Utility to format a flash drive as ExFAT.
[Ed Stevens] "Any ideas to get big wedding video files to the client? I'm curious what others do to get big file's to their clients."
Add $10 USD to the price of the package and give them their video on a 32GB Flash Drive. Format it for ExFAT and copy the M4V file onto it. Done deal!

BTW, there are companies that will put your name and logo on a flash drive cover. This makes it a great marketing tool as well because long after they copy the video off of it onto their hard drives, they will continue to use the flash drive with your name and logo on it. ;-)

~jr

http://www.johnrofrano.com
http://www.vasst.com



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gary adcock
Re: Delivery of large files to clients.
on Dec 14, 2015 at 4:05:45 pm

[Ed Stevens] "I'd like to offer my clients the .mov master file also. "
Traditionally that file in not turned over to a client. Especially in your market as a wedding shooter.

"I could provide them with a slim hard drive, formatted for a Mac OS Extended (journaled), loaded with their file(s). "

Why would you do that? Yes there is a 4GB limit on Fat32 formatting, but not on EXFAT {remember to eject the drive on the mac side or it will corrupt the directory}, will work much better for your clients as it is read /write on both platforms


"NTSF is read only on a Mac, so I couldn't load a file on there and I read that if you enable NTFS support on a Mac it's proven unstable."

There are a number of apps and drivers available that handle NTFS on the mac side.
Paragon and Tuxera are available for purchase as well as a couple of free versions.

Google "NTFS for Mac"

gary adcock
Studio37

Post and Production Workflow Consultant
Production and Post Stereographer
Chicago, IL


Follow my blog at http://www.garyadcock.com

Or follow me on Twitter
@garyadcock




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Joe Marler
Re: Delivery of large files to clients.
on Dec 14, 2015 at 5:30:06 pm

[Ed Stevens] "I'm a wedding videographer, after editing on FCPX, I deliver my clients Blu-rays. I also offer standard definition dvds if they ask for it. I'd like to offer my clients the .mov master file also....I could provide them with a slim hard drive, formatted for a Mac OS Extended (journaled), loaded with their file(s). But most clients don't have a Mac to read the hard drive...A 50 minute .mov video is about 30GB"

As optical media dies out this can be a difficult transition for smaller content providers. Increasingly customers use mobile devices which cannot even read an optical disc or (with Apple) a USB stick.

There's also no universal streaming equivalent of the DVD/Blu-Ray presentation format, with splash screens, background music, menus, etc.

Yet another problem is the perceived loss of value from not having a physical product. Customers may be willing to pay more for a shrink-wrapped jewel case with nice artwork and a custom printed disc.

Even though some households have internet-enabled TVs or ability to AirPlay/Miracast from mobile devices, in general the communal viewing experience is not as readily available for streaming content from smaller providers.

But none of this matters because optical media is on a fast track to total obsolescence. Content providers must find some solution. Here are some possibilities (some already mentioned). Some of these assume you've already handled the transaction separately, others allow e-commerce.

(1) Use custom-printed USB sticks, possibly mounted in a jewel case or laminated gift card
(2) Host the content on line and give the customer a polished, artistic gift card with QR code and URL to the site.
(3) For Roku you can make your own private channel which the customer can view: https://developer.roku.com/home They don't host the content but you can host it elsewhere (like Vimeo Pro)
(4) Use Vimeo Pro which allows presentation portfolios you can build without any programming: https://vimeo.com/pro This also allows you to optionally enable file download to your customer.
(5) Use Vimeo On Demand which allows ecommerce: http://tinyurl.com/zdd62yg
(6) Use unlisted or private Youtube video.

If you've already handled the transaction via other means you can give them an H264-encoded video file on USB devices or (depending on bandwidth, resolution and program length) send it via file transfer. My group is testing the Infinit.io peer-to-peer file transfer system. It has worked pretty well so far: https://infinit.io/

As already stated you don't need to give them a ProRes file. A 1080p H264 file is likely sufficient, and for many devices and scenarios it's hard to see the difference between that and 720p. In fact many broadcast and cable networks use exclusively 720p/60, including ABC, Fox, ESPN Networks, A&E Networks, and Disney Channels. Even if you watch those on a 1080p or 4k TV, you are actually seeing upscaled 720p content.


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Jeff Kirkland
Re: Delivery of large files to clients.
on Dec 14, 2015 at 7:32:43 pm

From personal experience, H.264 is pretty much your only choice for near universal file delivery. This brings delivery size down to down to something that will fit on a USB thumb drive.

If you are determined to give them a full copy of the MOV master file (which 90% of Windows users won't be able to play), then buy a small harddrive and give it to them on that.

In terms of the hard drive format, I use Paragon NTFS so I can read/write NTFS formatted drives. I just ask the client if they want Mac or PC.

Jeff Kirkland | Video Producer | Southern Creative Media | Melbourne Australia
http://www.southerncreative.com.au | G+: http://gplus.to/jeffkirkland | Twitter: @jeffkirkland


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