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Back up strategies.

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Craig Alan
Back up strategies.
on Oct 1, 2015 at 8:48:26 pm

I have all my FCP X files/folders on a raid 0 thunderbolt external driver.

I keep the original media outside the library
I also keep a card copy of each media card outside the library.

I have been backing up the entire raid onto another raid.

I have noticed that I need to relink the media if I launch the library from the back up drive. I think this is because my project files are pointing to the first raid not the back up. I find the fastest way to relink is to reimport.

So between the two raids I have four versions of the original media.

In order to save space I’m wondering if it would be just as secure to back up the card copies and FC project files instead of all the FC files/folders????

Mac Pro, macbook pro, Imacs (i7); Canon 5D Mark III/70D, Panasonic AG-HPX170/AG-HPX250P, Canon HV40, Sony Z7U/VX2000/PD170; FCP 6 certified; FCP X write professionally for a variety of media; teach video production in L.A.


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Noah Kadner
Re: Back up strategies.
on Oct 2, 2015 at 12:56:16 am

I would never launch the backups unless something is wrong with the originals. You can use project snapshots for versioning/experiments.

Noah

FCPWORKS - FCPX Workflow
Call Box Training


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Brett Sherman
Re: Back up strategies.
on Oct 2, 2015 at 1:54:44 pm

How do you have four versions? Two RAIDS = two versions. Your RAID 0 array is at least twice as likely to fail as a plain old hard drive - each drive only stores half of each file. Assuming your backup RAID is a RAID 5, it only provides you protection against a single hard drive failure, so I wouldn't consider it a tertiary backup. If you lose two drives it's gone, if your enclosure fails it's gone, if you accidentally delete a file it's gone. And RAIDs add a level of complexity where something can go wrong with your data. For online storage they work great, for backups not so much.

This is what I do. I partition my video server (or RAID 0 volume in your case) into hard drive size chunks (4 or 6 TB). Then each partition is matched with two backup hard drives. Synchronization is run nightly to one. The other is stored off site. Every few days they are swapped. Once a partition on the server is full, it is retired and not used for new media. Then a new partition is created, deleting the oldest one on the server (I still have the backup hard drives). Then after 5 or 6 years, I combine old backup drives onto new larger backup drives. That means as media gets older, I now have 4 backups. Eventually they will get put on SSDs when the price comes down and capacity increases. This will be much less volatile storage.

I've heard and experienced too many horror stories with tapes or compressed archives, It relies too heavily on the software vendor. Will they still be in business 10-20 years from now? Will you still be on the same platform? Without the software (and tape hardware) you can't access the data. I'm currently storing probably about 150 TB with data as old as 15 years, and as far as I know haven't lost a single file.

Now I'm doing institutional storage in which long-term is very important. You may not need to store stuff as long. But, bottom line is that hard drives are cheap enough, you really should be backing up everything anyways.


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Craig Alan
Re: Back up strategies.
on Oct 2, 2015 at 4:57:14 pm

Hi Bret.
Thanks for your help.

4 copies in the sense that if my media in FC gets corrupted and I've run into this, I have the original card copy to reimport.

But what I am hearing from you is that raids are less reliable than individual drives. I wonder if I can format one of these raids as just a bunch of drives. If so I could treat them as four independent hard drives.

I could then back up my master folders (projects) to independent drives. This would require a bit more organization than just cloning one raid to another but if it adds security, it would be better.

I was thinking of going to tape based back up system but thanks for the warning there.

Do you use some kind of dock to swap out bare hard drives or do you use individual enclosures?

I don't quite see how partitions helps all that much? If the drive fails then you loose all the partitions but the structure of a partition can also go bad so I guess it helps there and does provide a level of organization. Or does the partitions just allow easier cloning?

Are you saying that individual HDs are reliable for 5-6 years? I though more like 3-4 years. Do you use enterprise class?

Mac Pro, macbook pro, Imacs (i7); Canon 5D Mark III/70D, Panasonic AG-HPX170/AG-HPX250P, Canon HV40, Sony Z7U/VX2000/PD170; FCP 6 certified; FCP X write professionally for a variety of media; teach video production in L.A.


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Claude Lyneis
Re: Back up strategies.
on Oct 2, 2015 at 5:24:19 pm

I assume he partitions the Raid into pieces that can easily be copied to a single backup disk.

I use a 6 TB Raid 0 for my projects and imported media and then back it up on to a cheaper USB3 drive. I use Raid 0 for speed not safety. As everything for a project is in my libraries, I can move old libraries off to some other disk as they are no longer active. For me, it doesn't seem to be advantageous to save the imported media and projects/event on separate disks. One is not much good without the other. Also, no relinking is required.
I also copy the card media onto another disk, in case something gets seriously corrupted on the FCPX files.


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Brett Sherman
Re: Back up strategies.
on Oct 2, 2015 at 5:49:23 pm

[Craig Alan] "But what I am hearing from you is that raids are less reliable than individual drives. I wonder if I can format one of these raids as just a bunch of drives. If so I could treat them as four independent hard drives."

Over the long term, I would not want my backup on a RAID. There are fewer points of failure with a single hard drive than an array. But if it's for short term backups I think RAID is fine (so long as it's RAID 5, not RAID 0). Depending on your enclosure you could use them as JBOD (individual drives), but unless the drives are easy to remove I don't think I'd go that way.

[Craig Alan] "Do you use some kind of dock to swap out bare hard drives or do you use individual enclosures?"

USB 3 drives work, but I like standardizing, since I have so many drives, so I use bare hard drives. This enclosure seems to be working decently for me now: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1128873-REG/oyen_digital_3r2_eb3_m_mo.... I set it up for JBOD. It's trayless so I can swap drives in and out. But trayless enclosures can be a bit finicky.

[Craig Alan] "Are you saying that individual HDs are reliable for 5-6 years? I though more like 3-4 years. Do you use enterprise class?"

I don't use enterprise class. There is no defined longetivity of a drive. Bear in mind I have two of each. So if one fails I have another one. So I feel relatively certain that both drives aren't going to fail in that time period. But, by all means, if you sleep better replacing them every 3 year - why not.

Here is a study Google did on their hard drives (consumer class), but remember these are online 24/7 - http://static.googleusercontent.com/media/research.google.com/en//archive/d...

[Craig Alan] "I don't quite see how partitions helps all that much? If the drive fails then you loose all the partitions but the structure of a partition can also go bad so I guess it helps there and does provide a level of organization. Or does the partitions just allow easier cloning?"

Right. Easier cloning. Consistency in drive naming. So my backup has the same volume name as the partition on the server with "Backup1" or "Backup2" tacked onto the end of it. It just makes finding stuff in the future easier.


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Craig Alan
Re: Back up strategies.
on Oct 2, 2015 at 9:27:33 pm

Thanks Brett,

One more question: would the small backup project files that FCP X generates and card copies of all media be able to recreate a project in case of failure? This would be way less TBs then backing up my entire project folders.

I use a voyager dock with bare drives for other purposes and have never had an issue.

Mac Pro, macbook pro, Imacs (i7); Canon 5D Mark III/70D, Panasonic AG-HPX170/AG-HPX250P, Canon HV40, Sony Z7U/VX2000/PD170; FCP 6 certified; FCP X write professionally for a variety of media; teach video production in L.A.


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Craig Alan
Re: Back up strategies.
on Oct 2, 2015 at 4:58:12 pm

I launch it only to make sure the back up is solid.

Mac Pro, macbook pro, Imacs (i7); Canon 5D Mark III/70D, Panasonic AG-HPX170/AG-HPX250P, Canon HV40, Sony Z7U/VX2000/PD170; FCP 6 certified; FCP X write professionally for a variety of media; teach video production in L.A.


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Noah Kadner
Re: Back up strategies.
on Oct 2, 2015 at 7:53:50 pm

I wouldn't bother- you can use something like Chronosync or Carbon Copy Cloner instead and get a checksummed dupe.

No reason to actually check in FCPX if the data is ok. Not like you're going to play every last clip and make sure they have no glitches....

Noah

FCPWORKS - FCPX Workflow
Call Box Training


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Craig Alan
Re: Back up strategies.
on Oct 2, 2015 at 9:19:14 pm

I use CCC. But I'm wondering if there isn't a space saving and less time consuming way to back up my projects. Project file + original media or media copy copies??? Would that be able to recreate the project after a drive failure or whatever???

Mac Pro, macbook pro, Imacs (i7); Canon 5D Mark III/70D, Panasonic AG-HPX170/AG-HPX250P, Canon HV40, Sony Z7U/VX2000/PD170; FCP 6 certified; FCP X write professionally for a variety of media; teach video production in L.A.


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