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Michael Sanders
Camera Archives
on Mar 27, 2014 at 5:00:41 pm

So I'm working on this project at the moment where we shooting over a number of days. What I've been doing is ingesting the cards into separate folders marked day one, day two etc. And then after each days cards have been ingested - I burn the days folder over to Blu-ray Discs using Toast.

Can anyone tell me if there's any benefit making camera archives on FCP X then using my method?

Michael Sanders
London Based DP/Editor


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Bill Davis
Re: Camera Archives
on Mar 27, 2014 at 8:03:18 pm

Michael,

I think so - absolutely.

The central benefit of this type of digital archive is that it provides a "one step - one file" image of the entire card or drive structure - including everything the camera recorded and generated - typically the file, the sidecar metadata files, and any camera generated thumbnails.

As a "packetized unit" a camera card clone is simple and easy to manage. Upon launch, X is constantly polling the computer busses to see if someone has inserted a card or other storage device it can read - Launching a Camera Archive looks to the computer as if the user has just inserted the original camera card so you get file ID data that is "frozen" at a level above that of just "desktop files" that the finder can too easily lose track of.

Essentially, X always LOOKS for mounted volumes - and a Camera Archive IS precisely that in a way that a folder of files is not.

The only downside of the built in X Camera Archive function is that you have to launch X in order to do your archives and clones.

For precisely that reason, I prefer Andreas Keils SCDI program - which lets you create Sparse Disk Bundles from the desktop whether or not X is running.

But Archive workflow makes a lot of things easier.

All this said, I don't work in a large facility environment, so if you're looking to manage Archives across NAS or shared solutions, others will have to chime in.

But as someone who edits at a desk most of the time, but also needs to travel quite a bit - and wants to keep my FCP-X Libraries small so I can take more of them on the road - a Referenced Media workflow that uses Archives or Sparse Bundles as the media source is something I value very highly.

My laptop holds EVERYTHING I'm working on - EXCEPT the original card files. And I just launch the Libraries and the Archives I need - when I need them - from either my travel drives - OR from my desktop drives as the circumstance requires.

Without the Archive process, I'd be dragging around BIG "Managed Media" pools everywhere - or constantly having to switch drives and wasting time trying to "re-link" my work as in the old days.

FWIW.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Michael Sanders
Re: Camera Archives
on Mar 28, 2014 at 9:42:16 am

Bill,

I'm sorry I don't get how your reply fits my question..

My question concerns backups, in this case to optical media. And how and where camera archives fit in to that part of the process. If I want to make a verified copy of the card I'll use shot-put pro first as it copies to 3 drives at the same time.

I'm more that happy with my current workflow and to be honest can't see any advantage to a camera archive there. The media still has to live somewhere, either in ingested form or as an archive. The only benefit I can see with Camera Archives is that you don't have to ingest all the card into the library if you don't want to.

FWIW you know that if you keep your libraries on the system drive and that when you render something (a colour correction etc!), that the render files will then live on the system drive inside the library folder. If that file is Prores 422 it could well impede performance your overall system - in many many ways. Not least it will fill up your system drive!

Its still one of my biggest bugbears about how FCP X works.

Michael Sanders
London Based DP/Editor


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Bill Davis
Re: Camera Archives
on Mar 30, 2014 at 5:45:39 am
Last Edited By Bill Davis on Mar 30, 2014 at 5:47:41 am

[Michael Sanders] "My question concerns backups, in this case to optical media. And how and where camera archives fit in to that part of the process. If I want to make a verified copy of the card I'll use shot-put pro first as it copies to 3 drives at the same time."

If I misunderstood you, sorry. I thought you might be after backups that are able to be instantly usable to enable X editing capabilities quickly and in a single step. That's where Camera Archives shine.

If you're exclusiveley concerned with archiving pools of footage - and you're never going to need a workflow where launching that pool makes it instantly available for editing - then the ShotPutPro system will do everything you want.

In my thinking it's "disconnected" backups - verses backups that are purpose created to have the potential to be live sources for editing with a simple double click.

Said another way, a folder full of clips, copy verified by SPP - OR dragged into a backup folder manually will have no integrated "virtual card ID" that X will "see" as a mounted drive volume which can then be read into the database and launch as an asset - complete with all the original card or drive metadata intact and precisely where X expects to find it.

If you don't value that, then there is no reason to use the Camera Archive function.

If you do, then there is.

Simple as that.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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