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How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?

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andy patterson
How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 20, 2017 at 9:37:04 am

What devices do you use and what software programs do you use them with? How do you like the integration of the two products?


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Warren Eig
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 20, 2017 at 5:32:59 pm

I use the Mackie Pro Control (MCU) with the eight fader extension. I wish it would be supported in FCPX like it was in FCP7 but, alas, no tracks in FCPX so no way to implement. I hope Resolve makes use of it one day...

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andy patterson
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 20, 2017 at 8:11:36 pm

[Warren Eig] "I use the Mackie Pro Control (MCU) with the eight fader extension. I wish it would be supported in FCPX like it was in FCP7 but, alas, no tracks in FCPX so no way to implement. I hope Resolve makes use of it one day..."

That kind of sucks. I know Mackie has some cool control surfaces. I use a Korg nano Kontrol 2 with Premiere Pro and Audition. It works good for $59.99. It would be great if the faders were 15-20 millimeters longer but it works OK. It has your basic solo, mute, record buttons. The only bad thing is that when the solo and mute buttons are depressed they turn red. I wish the buttons would make use of red, yellow and green like most NLEs and DAWs.


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Michael Gissing
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 21, 2017 at 3:09:38 am

I've had control surfaces where possible for decades. My DAWs of choice, dSP and then Fairlight were built around custom hardware controllers and mixers.

When I went back to grading I started with FCP4.5, I immediately thought the keyboard mouse interface was just awful. Slow and so bad ergonomically. I still feel the same about all NLEs driven by ASCII keyboards and mice. I tried various things like the Contour Shuttle. The jogging was hopeless but having a few extra dedicated buttons helped a bit. With Color I then bought the Tangent Wave which made grading a whole lot faster and more accurate, as well as ergonomically better. After the jog accuracy of the Fairlight though, the jog wheel was sloppy. With Resolve, I have been using the Tangent and although it is not as well laid out as the Tangent implementation in Color, it sure beats grading with a mouse.

I asked Fairlight at one stage if they were interested in bridging their control hardware with an NLE. They did in the end but with Adobe. Not many people know that Premiere can be controlled by the Fairlight Xynergi controller. I had just swapped from using CS6 as a tool with Resolve to just finishing in Resolve and doing basic editing so I never got the software to make it happen. I am so looking forward to using the Fairlight controller and mixer panels with Resolve 14 however. Until you use a well laid out ergonomic controller with dedicated self labeling buttons and an awesome jog shuttle, you poor keyboard, mice and even pen/tablet editors just don't know how much more comfortable, fun and fast properly designed controllers are. Watching people adapt MIDI controllers to apps not designed for them seems clumsy to me. Maybe sometimes an improvement but nothing compared to real controllers.


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andy patterson
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 21, 2017 at 5:47:24 am

[Michael Gissing] "With Resolve, I have been using the Tangent and although it is not as well laid out as the Tangent implementation in Color, it sure beats grading with a mouse."

The control surface lets you adjust several parameters at once as opposed to one operation at a time when using a mouse. Just seeing a 2-3 minute long video of a control surface in action is usually not impressive. It is when you work with it for several hours and you don't have to use mouse click after mouse click after mouse click that the benefits are revealed.


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Michael Gissing
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 21, 2017 at 6:06:08 am

Being able to trim multi values is important but it is so much more with a control panel. When grading you look at the screen while you make changes rather than looking at where the mouse is on screen before clicking. It reduces eye movement which is so underestimated in why mouse based work is slower and much more tiring.

Precision is also key. A trackball has much finer adjustment feel. Trim pots for luma, gamma etc have a push down click to reset. So many little refinements that add up to hours saved and superior ergonomics that a good control panel pays for itself within a single feature doco job. I just don't get why people don't seem to demand this sort of control. Once you have used it you can't accept mouse and keyboard again.


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Peter Gruden
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 21, 2017 at 7:01:49 am

[Michael Gissing] "Until you use a well laid out ergonomic controller with dedicated self labeling buttons and an awesome jog shuttle, you poor keyboard, mice and even pen/tablet editors just don't know how much more comfortable, fun and fast properly designed controllers are. Watching people adapt MIDI controllers to apps not designed for them seems clumsy to me. Maybe sometimes an improvement but nothing compared to real controllers."

So true.
I was using general controllers like Euphonix Artist, CM Motormix, Steinberg Huston, Contour Shuttle and also programmable keyboards/macro recorders, but not anymore. Also had JL Cooper MCS 3800 to control video and audio programs (Incite and Nuendo), but all of them can't touch dedicated surface with a proper jog wheel.

Back in the 90' I was using awesome Akai DD1500. With a great jog and just a dozen of dedicated buttons you could perform 90% of operations very fast. One of the best dedicated controllers currently is Yamaha Nuage for Nuendo.

But I'm not sure if complex programs like FCPX or Premiere Pro would benefit from a dedicated controller, except for basic transport and editing.



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andy patterson
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 21, 2017 at 7:18:32 pm

[Peter Gruden] "But I'm not sure if complex programs like FCPX or Premiere Pro would benefit from a dedicated controller, except for basic transport and editing."

Premiere Pro can make use of control surfaces for color grading and audio. Someone stated that FCPX will not work with Mackie and I imagine other audio based control surfaces like the Korg nanaKontrol 2 because it does not have audio tracks. I think you can get a 3rd party app to make the audio control surfaces work with 15% functionality. To me it is not worth doing. As far as FCPX making use of color correction control surfaces it might be able to.


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andy patterson
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 22, 2017 at 10:37:44 am

This looks interesting. My other post had the wrong link.







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Walter Soyka
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 25, 2017 at 6:40:58 pm

[andy patterson] "I use a Korg nano Kontrol 2 with Premiere Pro and Audition. It works good for $59.99."

How does mixing work without motorized faders?

Walter Soyka
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andy patterson
Re: How many of you use a control surface for audio and video editing?
on Sep 25, 2017 at 8:33:12 pm

[Walter Soyka] "[andy patterson] "I use a Korg nano Kontrol 2 with Premiere Pro and Audition. It works good for $59.99."

How does mixing work without motorized faders?"




How does an old analogue mixer work? It just does : )

I kid I kid.


Having said that my Sound Craft 16 channel mixer from 1998 with the 100MM long throw faders was not motorized. I do not believe in motorized faders.

To answer your question. As you cycle though channels the audio level of channel 1, 9 can be a different levels and they will stay in place as you cycle back and forth between channels. You can see a jump if you want adjust the level of channel 1 and channel 1 and 9 have different audio levels. If you are not adjusting the volume there is nothing to worry about. The audio levels of channel 1 and 9 will not move. Having said that the small little jump when adjusting the volume level is not an issue because you will be adjusting the audio level of that channel any how. Does it make sense? Rather than making the control surfaces complex I say make them simple and inexpensive. Offer simple 24 and 32 channel control surfaces that have the same basic functions of an old analogue mixing board then you will not need to cycle through channels. The Korg nanKontrol 2 is very simple and basic. Having sad that if you have channels1,2 and 8 muted channels 9, 10 and 16 would not be muted when you cycle though channels. As I stated they are using LEDs so you know what channel is muted and soloed but the mute, solo and record are all using red LEDs. That is my biggest complaint about the Korg nanoKontrol 2. They need to have red, green and yellow LEDS but for $59.99 it is money well spent. I hope this helped. If not I can make a tutorial if you want.


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