FORUMS: list search recent posts

Behind the scenes on "18:20" and workflow for Divine Access

COW Forums : Apple Final Cut Pro X Debates

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Andrew Kimery
Behind the scenes on "18:20" and workflow for Divine Access
on Mar 15, 2015 at 4:44:03 am

A couple of times Bill as commented on the lack of stories about people using Adobe so I thought I mention these two.

The first is a behind the scenes video for a short called "18:20".
The Making of 18:20 - https://vimeo.com/89815965

An interesting thing about this one, besides the team being spread out across the world, is the integration of SpeedGrade. Besides the Direct Link between SG and PPro (which is currently my favorite thing about SG) you can save grades in SG as .look files and apply them as filters in PS, AE or PPro.



The other article is from our own Oliver Peters (apologies if this has been posted before and I missed it). They used Adobe Anywhere on an indie film called "Divine Access". The editing was done on Avid though as that's what the editor was comfortable with.

https://digitalfilms.wordpress.com/2015/01/29/adobe-anywhere-and-divine-acc...


Return to posts index

Oliver Peters
Re: Behind the scenes on "18:20" and workflow for Divine Access
on Mar 15, 2015 at 4:57:07 pm

Thanks for posting. There are also some stories coming out about Sundance and SXSW films that were cut using Premiere Pro. Some of these are Adobe sponsored stories and others not. In the case of both festivals, there was an uptick of editors using Premiere Pro this year.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


Return to posts index

Andrew Kimery
Re: Behind the scenes on "18:20" and workflow for Divine Access
on Mar 15, 2015 at 6:52:53 pm

Oliver,

What's your take on Adobe Anywhere? It's obviously not inexpensive, but G-Men Media certainly doesn't have the deep pockets that, say, CNN does. As technology marches forward and prices go down while performance goes up do you see Anywhere becoming more accessible to smaller shops or do you think it will mostly remain niche and pricey?


Return to posts index


Oliver Peters
Re: Behind the scenes on "18:20" and workflow for Divine Access
on Mar 15, 2015 at 7:12:07 pm

That's hard for me to answer, since I haven't actually worked with it myself. For more details on how it works, read my overview here:

https://digitalfilms.wordpress.com/2014/07/11/adobe-anywhere/

It takes 3 servers plus shared storage and that covers 10-15 simultaneous users. Although it's promoted as a remote or "cloud" solution, it could just as easily be set up on a LAN as an in-house facility. In that way it competes with both remote editing systems (MC | Cloud, Quantel Qtube, etc.) as well as project-sharing solutions (EditShare, Avid Isis/Unity, etc.).

Because it requires a certain amount of IT smarts and very fast pipes if you want to upload remote media back to the server, I don't see it catching on that quickly with small shops. Not necessarily because of price. Servers aren't necessarily that expensive and if you can afford a SAN anyway, it's not that big of a leap. I just think the workflow is enough different to simply not be that appealing. In the end, producers and managers want their people close by.

I see more potential in systems like Forscene or A-Frame maybe, or Thunderbolt-connected SANs. Granted these are quite different products appealing to different needs. Ironically, when I spoke with the Turner post folks at the SE Creative Summit over a year ago, they didn't see much use for it. It's only going into the CNN news operation. But, I could be completely wrong.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


Return to posts index

Andrew Kimery
Re: Behind the scenes on "18:20" and workflow for Divine Access
on Mar 16, 2015 at 5:43:36 am
Last Edited By Andrew Kimery on Mar 16, 2015 at 5:44:20 am

Have you heard about the collaboration between Media Silo and Adobe? Sounds similar to what Forscene is going for except you edit directly inside of Premiere. Below is a review of it from a few months ago. Still working out some kinks but interesting none the less.

http://postperspective.com/review-mediasilo-premiereprelude-integration/


[Oliver Peters] "Because it requires a certain amount of IT smarts and very fast pipes if you want to upload remote media back to the server, I don't see it catching on that quickly with small shops."

Probably because I'm an editor my first reaction to Anywhere is for local production that allows for remote post production. So, pretty much the opposite of the Divine Access workflow. You do your shoot and get the media onto the shared storage at the shop, just like you normally would, but then the post team could be located anywhere and just 'dial-in' to access everything.

A couple of years ago I was talking with a guy that had a small shop in LA and at the office were just a couple of AE's and a finishing editor (it was literally a small shop). The editors would get a drive full of footage, cut at home, send QTs for review at regular intervals and then email the project file for the locked edit. The AE's would relink it to the local media at the shop and hand it off to the finishing editor. Not only does save money on office space but it also lets the editors work from home.

The sneaker-net setup with the drives works well enough, but by going with something like AA it further streamlines the process as well as reaches beyond just the local talent pool. On 18:20, for example, Kanen is on the West Coast but the rest of the post team is spread out between the West Coast, the East Coast, Germany and Poland. Again, the price point has to be right, but AA could really help breakdown the distance barrier on collaborate projects.


Return to posts index

Oliver Peters
Re: Behind the scenes on "18:20" and workflow for Divine Access
on Mar 16, 2015 at 5:03:45 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "Have you heard about the collaboration between Media Silo and Adobe?"

No, I'm afraid I haven't. There are too many of these to keep track of. ;-)

[Andrew Kimery] "You do your shoot and get the media onto the shared storage at the shop, just like you normally would, but then the post team could be located anywhere and just 'dial-in' to access everything."

That's how Anywhere works, but the dial-in can also be from within the same building, too.

[Andrew Kimery] "A couple of years ago I was talking with a guy that had a small shop in LA and at the office were just a couple of AE's and a finishing editor (it was literally a small shop). The editors would get a drive full of footage, cut at home, send QTs for review at regular intervals and then email the project file for the locked edit. The AE's would relink it to the local media at the shop and hand it off to the finishing editor. Not only does save money on office space but it also lets the editors work from home. "

This is basically the model that G-Men have set up, except instead of sneaker-net, they have Anywhere. This enables the creative execs on a project to pick their editorial talent from anywhere on the planet. No costs to fly-in and house an editor from some other place. Or in LA, no daily commute across town to get to the bay each day. It has the added benefit that the director and other execs do not have to be in the same locale either, since they can also log in and access the same Adobe Anywhere Production. Lastly, from the studio perspective, you have control over the media, since no drives exist locally with the editor.

[Andrew Kimery] "but by going with something like AA it further streamlines the process as well as reaches beyond just the local talent pool."

Correct. Unfortunately this also enables a certain amount of potential outsourcing of editorial talent, just like with VFX. This will scare the heck out of some - and others will be fine with it. Ultimately it will happen either way.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


Return to posts index


Andrew Kimery
Re: Behind the scenes on "18:20" and workflow for Divine Access
on Mar 16, 2015 at 5:20:06 pm

[Oliver Peters] "Correct. Unfortunately this also enables a certain amount of potential outsourcing of editorial talent, just like with VFX. This will scare the heck out of some - and others will be fine with it. Ultimately it will happen either way."

Definitely a possible downside, though to a degree it's inevitable so might as well try to make the most of it. haha


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]